Related categories
Subcategories:
Animal Cognition* (370 | 284)
Animal Ethics* (2,488 | 1,433)
History/traditions: Non-Human Animals
30 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
Material to categorize
  1. F. H. Heinemann (1954). Man, The Believing Animal. Hibbert Journal 53:51.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Non-Human Animals, Misc
  1. Donald Broom (2011). A History of Animal Welfare Science. Acta Biotheoretica 59 (2):121-137.
    Human attitudes to animals have changed as non-humans have become more widely incorporated in the category of moral agents who deserve some respect. Parallels between the functioning of humans and non-humans have been made for thousands of years but the idea that the animals that we keep can suffer has spread recently. An improved understanding of motivation, cognition and the complexity of social behaviour in animals has led in the last 30 years to the rapid development of animal welfare science. (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Justin Clemens (2009). Man is a Swarm Animal. In Dominiek Hoens, Sigi Jottkandt & Gert Buelens (eds.), The Catastrophic Imperative: Subjectivity, Time and Memory in Contemporary Thought. Palgrave Macmillan
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Carmine Di Martino (2012). Husserl e la questione uomo/animale. Nóema 3:1-34.
    Nell’agenda della fenomenologia non figura la questione uomo-animale. E tuttavia nell’ultima fase della sua riflessione Husserl ha ripetutamente affrontato il tema, nell’ottica di una analisi fenomenologico-trascendentale della costituzione del mondo umano. La fenomenologia husserliana si mostra come una via per interrogare, in maniera non ideologica, a partire dall’esperienza del mondo della vita, i problemi della animalità e dell’umanità, per ripensare differenze e continuità.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. S. Benjamin Fink (2010). Review of Victoria Braithwaite's „Do Fish Feel Pain?“. [REVIEW] Metapsychology 14 (34).
  5. Dienstag Joshua Foa (2006). Book Review: The Open: Man and Animal. [REVIEW] Political Theory 34 (1).
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Por Francis Dov, The Persistent Progression: A Third View on Animal Evolution.
    Abstract. Animal evolution is seen today through the dilemma of two reigning views. The first sees animal evolution as a shallow sequence of contingent accidents and catastrophic extinctions. The second ,accepting a progressive trend in this evolution, sees a hidden vitalistic or deistic force at work. I propose a third way which accepts progressivism , but considers it to be a historical consequence of directional dissipative thermodynamic processes which are acting on the globe. The animals have a crucial role in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Erica Fudge (2011). Attempting Animal Histories. Society and Animals 19 (4):425-431.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Carl D. Hopkins (1982). Animal Sonar Animal Sonar Systems: NATO Advanced Study Institutes René-Guy Busnel James F. Fish. BioScience 32 (9):752-752.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. John T. Jost, Gráinne Fitzsimons & Aaron C. Kay (2004). The Ideological Animal. In Jeff Greenberg, Sander L. Koole & Tom Pyszczynski (eds.), Handbook of Experimental Existential Psychology. Guilford Press 263--283.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Geert Keil (2012). Beyond Assimilationism and Differentialism: Comment on Glock. In Elif Özmen & Julian Nida-Rümelin (eds.), Welt der Gründe. Meiner
    In a number of articles, Hans-Johann Glock has argued against the »lingualist« view that higher mental capacities are a prerogative of language-users. He has defended the »assimilationist« claim that the mental capacities of humans and of non-human animals differ only in degree. In the paper under discussion, Glock argues that animals are capable of acting for reasons, provided that reasons are construed along the lines of the new »objectivist« theory of practical reasons. The paper critizices these views.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. P. Lee (2005). Erica Fudge. Perceiving'animals: Humans and Beasts in Early Modem English Culture. Early Science and Medicine 10 (3):447.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. S. Levy (1999). Defending Whole-Animal Collections-Response. BioScience 49 (7):512-512.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Akira Mizuta Lippit (2000). Electric Animal Toward a Rhetoric of Wildlife. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. G. López (2009). Catalina. Inteligencia Animal En Aristóteles. Discusiones Filosóficas 10 (15):69-81.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Bryan F. J. Manly, Trent L. Mcdonald, Steven C. Amstrup & Eric V. Regehr (2003). Improving Size Estimates of Open Animal Populations by Incorporating Information on Age. BioScience 53 (7):666-669.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. H. Marcum (2007). Living with Animals: Snakes and Humans. In M. Bekoff (ed.), Encyclopedia of Human-Animal Relationships. Greenwood Press 1181--1184.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Marco Maurizi (2013). Critical Theory and the “Animal Question”. Society and Animals 21 (5):489-493.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Dawne McCance (2013). Critical Animal Studies: An Introduction. State University of New York Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Robert McKay (2007). A Comprehensive Animal Series. Society and Animals 15 (2):203-205.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Tania Munz (2008). Rat. Animal Series. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 41 (3):445-447.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Siobhan O'Sullivan (2011). Animals, Equality and Democracy. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Series Editors' Foreword -- Preface by Prof. Robert Garner, University of Leicester, UK -- Introduction: Where are all the Animals? -- Animal Citizens -- The Political Lives of Animals -- Animal Invisibility -- Out of Sight, Out of Mind -- Applying the Justice Principle to Animal Citizens -- Conclusion -- References -- Index.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Michael O’Sullivan (2004). The Open: Man and Animal. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 128.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Tano S. Posteraro (forthcoming). Deleuze's Larval Subject and the Question of Bodily TIme. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy.
    This paper treats Deleuze's first synthesis of time and the corresponding concept of larval subjectivity by routing it through a biophilosophy of organism. I develop, out of my reading of Deleuze, a temporal concept of organismic subjectivity.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Tano S. Posteraro (2014). Organismic Spatiality: Toward a Metaphysic of Composition. Environment and Planning D 32 (4):739-752.
    The task of this paper is the construction of a theory of organismic spatiality. I take as a starting point Gilles Deleuze’s reference in The Logic of Sense to Gilbert Simondon’s concept of the membrane. The membrane is a dynamically topological limit between the organism’s milieus of interiority and exteriority—the first moment of organismic spatiality. It is the foundation of the organism as an entity spatially distinct from its environment. The membrane is discriminatory and asymmetric—a concept, I claim, best understood (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Tano S. Posteraro (2014). On the Utility of Virtuality for Relating Abilities and Affordances. Ecological Psychology 26 (4):353-367.
    This article introduces the concept of virtuality into the question of the ontological status of ability-affordance relations in ecological psychology. By differentiating concrete affordances and animal activities from the somatic-environmental networks they actualize, I argue that ecological-psychological thought is brought into a better position from which to think the ability-affordance relation as a ground for the developmental entanglements of organisms and their subjective environments (i.e., the affordances that constitute their niches). I begin by sketching the aporia to be filled in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Norman J. Scott, Mark R. Jennings & Sharon Levy (1999). Defending Whole-Animal Collections. BioScience 49 (7):511.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Gilbert Simondon (2012). Two Lessons on Animal and Man. Univocal Publishing.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Paul Waldau (2013). Animal Studies: An Introduction. OUP Usa.
    Animal studies is a growing interdisciplinary field which seeks to understand how humans study and conceive of other-than-human animals, and how these conceptions have changed over time, across cultures, and among various scholarly modes of inquiry. Until now, this growing field has lacked a comprehensive introductory text appropriate for new scholars. Animal Studies: An Introduction fills this deficiency, providing the first holistic survey of the field.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Michael Ziser (2007). Animal Mirrors. Angelaki 12 (3):11 – 33.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation