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  1. Kristin Andrews (2014). The Animal Mind: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Animal Cognition. Routledge.
    The study of animal cognition raises profound questions about the minds of animals and philosophy of mind itself. Aristotle argued that humans are the only animal to laugh, but in recent experiments rats have also been shown to laugh. In other experiments, dogs have been shown to respond appropriately to over two hundred words in human language. In this introduction to the philosophy of animal minds Kristin Andrews introduces and assesses the essential topics, problems and debates as they cut across (...)
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  2. Pamela J. Asquith (1997). Why Anthropomorphism is Not Metaphor: Crossing Concepts and Cultures in Animal Behavior Studies. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. 22--34.
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  3. Amitrajeet A. Batabyal (2000). In Nature's Interest? Interests, Animal Rights, and Environmental Ethics by Gary E. Varner. Agriculture and Human Values 17 (4):399-400.
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  4. M. Bavidge & I. Ground (2009). Do Animals Need a Theory of Mind? In I. Leudar & A. Costall (eds.), Against Theory of Mind‎. Palgrave. 167--188.
    This book brings together disparate strands of ToM research, lays out historical roots of the idea, and indicates better alternatives.
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  5. Lynda Birke & Jane Smith (1995). Animals in Experimental Reports: The Rhetoric of Science. Society and Animals 3 (1):23-42.
    In this paper, we analyze the ways in which the use of animals is described in the "Methods" sections of scientific papers. We focus particularly on aspects of the language of scientific narrative and what it conveys to the reader about the animals. Scientific writing, for example, tends to omit details of how the animals are cared for. Perhaps more importantly, it is constructed in ways that tend to minimize what is happening to the animal; thus, animal death is obscured (...)
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  6. Manuel Bremer (2007). Methodologische Überlegungen zu tierischen Überzeugungen / Methodological Reflections on Exploring Beliefs in Animals. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 38 (2):347 - 355.
    A theory of the beliefs of non-human animals is not closed to us, only because we do not have beliefs of their kind. Starting from a theory of human beliefs and working on a building block model of propositional attitudes a theory of animal beliefs is viable. Such a theory is an example of the broader conception of a heterophenomenological approach to animal cognition. The theory aims at outlining the crucial differences between human and animal beliefs as well as the (...)
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  7. R. Brook (1999). Clarke, SRL-Animals and Their Moral Standing. Philosophical Books 40:56-57.
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  8. Charles S. Brown (2007). The Intentionality and Animal Heritage of Moral Experience. In Christian Lotz & Corinne Painter (eds.), Phenomenology and the Non-Human Animal. Springer. 85--95.
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  9. Stanley Cavell, Cora Diamond, John McDowell, Ian Hacking & Cary Wolfe (2008). Philosophy and Animal Life. Columbia University Press.
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  10. Marco Celentano, Barbara De Mori, Paolo Zecchinato & E. Alleva (eds.) (2012). Etologia Ed Etica. Aracne.
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  11. Scott D. Churchill (2006). Encountering the Animal Other: Reflections on Moments of Empathic Seeing. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology: Methodology: Special Edition 6:p - 1.
    The ultimate challenge for psychology as a human science inheres in accessing the experience of the other. In general, the field of psychology has perpetuated the epistemological dualism of distinguishing between the realm accessible by external perception and the realm accessible by inner perception, and hence between the subjective and the objective , regarding the "first person" perspective as a legitimate means of access only to one's own private experience, while insisting that all others' experience must be observed from a (...)
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  12. Judy MacArthur Clark (2009). Rethinking Animals and Food. BioScience 59 (9):806.
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  13. Justin Clemens (2009). Man is a Swarm Animal. In Dominiek Hoens, Sigi Jottkandt & Gert Buelens (eds.), The Catastrophic Imperative: Subjectivity, Time and Memory in Contemporary Thought. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  14. Sarah R. Cohen (2010). Searching the Animal Psyche with Charles Le Brun. Annals of Science 67 (3):353-382.
    Summary Around 1670 the French court painter and Academician Charles Le Brun produced a series of drawings featuring naturalistic animal heads, as well as imaginary heads in which he refashioned various nonhuman animal species to make humanoid physiognomies. What were the purpose and significance of these unusual works? I argue that they show Le Brun's interest in what we today would call animal psychology: focusing upon the sensory organs and their connections with the animal's brain, Le Brun studied his animals (...)
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  15. ColinAllen (2004). Animal Pain. Noûs 38 (4):617–643.
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  16. R. Cook (1991). The Experimental-Analysis of Cognition in Animals. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):512-512.
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  17. Justin J. Couchman, Michael J. Beran, Mariana Vc Coutinho, Joseph Boomer & J. David Smith (2012). Evidence for Animal Metaminds. In Michael Beran, Johannes Brandl, Josef Perner & Joëlle Proust (eds.), The Foundations of Metacognition. Oxford University Press.
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  18. David DeGrazia (1997). Great Apes, Dolphins, and the Concept of Personhood. Southern Journal of Philosophy 35 (3):301-320.
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  19. Donald A. Dewsbury (1991). Animal Learning (& Behavior?). Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (1):57-58.
  20. Carmine Di Martino (2012). Husserl e la questione uomo/animale. Nóema 3:1-34.
    Nell’agenda della fenomenologia non figura la questione uomo-animale. E tuttavia nell’ultima fase della sua riflessione Husserl ha ripetutamente affrontato il tema, nell’ottica di una analisi fenomenologico-trascendentale della costituzione del mondo umano. La fenomenologia husserliana si mostra come una via per interrogare, in maniera non ideologica, a partire dall’esperienza del mondo della vita, i problemi della animalità e dell’umanità, per ripensare differenze e continuità.
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  21. D. A. Dobrowski (2003). Animal Others: On Ethics, Ontology, and Animal Life by H. Peter Steeves (Ed.). Society and Animals 11 (1):113-115.
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  22. M. Dol, S. Kasanmoentalib, S. E. E. M. Lijmbach, E. Rivas & R. Bos, Animal Consciousness and Animal Ethics.
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  23. M. Dol, S. Kasanmoentalib, S. E. E. M. Lijmbach, E. Rivas & R. Bos, Animal Consciousness and Animal Ethics.
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  24. M. Dol, S. Kasanmoentalib, S. Lijmbach, E. Rivas & R. van den Bos (1999). Boekbesprekingen Animal Consciousness and Animal Ethics. [REVIEW] Filosofie En Praktijk 20:95-95.
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  25. Jason T. Eberl (2001). Dombrowski, Daniel A. Not Even a Sparrow Falls: The Philosophy of Stephen R. L. Clark. Review of Metaphysics 55 (1):131-132.
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  26. J. D. G. Evans (1995). Animal Minds and Human Morals. Philosophical Books 36 (2):130-133.
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  27. Doranne Fenoaltea (1972). Three Animal Images in the Delie: New Perspectives on Sceve's Use of Petrarch's Rime. Bibliothèque d'Humanisme Et Renaissance 34 (3):413-426.
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  28. Dienstag Joshua Foa (2006). Book Review: The Open: Man and Animal. [REVIEW] Political Theory 34 (1).
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  29. Erica Fudge (2011). Attempting Animal Histories. Society and Animals 19 (4):425-431.
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  30. Andrew Gleeson (2001). Animal Animation. Philosophia 28 (1-4):137-169.
    The original publication can be found at www.springerlink.com.
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  31. Hans Johann Glock, Animal Minds: A Non-Representationalist Approach.
    Do animals have minds? We have known at least since Aristotle that humans constitute one species of animal. And some benighted contemporaries apart, we also know that most humans have minds. To have any bite, therefore, the question must be restricted to non-human animals, to which I shall henceforth refer simply as "animals." I shall further assume that animals are bereft of linguistic faculties. So, do some animals have minds comparable to those of humans? As regards that question, there are (...)
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  32. Hans-Johann Glock (2013). Animal Minds: A Non-Representationalist Approach. American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (3):213-232.
    Do animals have minds? We have known at least since Aristotle that humans constitute one species of animal. And some benighted contemporaries apart, we also know that most humans have minds. To have any bite, therefore, the question must be restricted to non-human animals, to which I shall henceforth refer simply as "animals." I shall further assume that animals are bereft of linguistic faculties. So, do some animals have minds comparable to those of humans? As regards that question, there are (...)
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  33. Donald R. Griffin (1986). The Minds of Animals. BioScience 36 (1):52-54.
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  34. Bart Gruzalski (2004). The Ability To Be Moral Fails To Show That Humans Are More Valuable Than Nonhuman Animals. Essays in Philosophy 5 (2):15.
    Most philosophers believe that humans have far greater moral worth than nonhuman animals. This consensus position invites the following question: What characteristic or group of characteristics of human beings differentiates us from nonhuman animals so that we have greater moral worth than nonhuman animals? Philosophers have offered a number of characteristics that allegedly show human beings to be superior to nonhuman animals. At the top of the list we find thinking and the ability to be rational. Further down the list (...)
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  35. Jack P. Hailman (1974). Ethology The Animal in Its World: Explorations of an Ethologist, 1932-1972, Volume I, Field Studies Niko Tinbergen. BioScience 24 (10):592-592.
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  36. Jack P. Hailman (1969). Bibliography: Animal Behavior. BioScience 19 (10):949-950.
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  37. Brian A. Hazlett (1991). Studying Animal's Minds. BioScience 41 (9):637-638.
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  38. F. H. Heinemann (1954). Man, The Believing Animal. Hibbert Journal 53:51.
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  39. Patrick Holden (2006). Respecting Animal Sentience in Organic Farming. In Jacky Turner & Joyce D'Silva (eds.), Animals, Ethics, and Trade: The Challenge of Animal Sentience. Earthscan. 175.
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  40. Carl D. Hopkins (1982). Animal Sonar Animal Sonar Systems: NATO Advanced Study Institutes René-Guy Busnel James F. Fish. BioScience 32 (9):752-752.
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  41. Nicholas Humphrey (2007). The Society of Selves. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences 362 (1480):745-754.
    Human beings are not only the most sociable animals on Earth, but also the only animals that have to ponder the separateness that comes with having a conscious self. The philosophical problem of ‘other minds’ nags away at people’s sense of who—and why—they are. But the privacy of consciousness has an evolutionary history—and maybe even an evolutionary function. While recognizing the importance to humans of mind-reading and psychic transparency, we should consider the consequences and possible benefits of being—ultimately—psychically opaque.
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  42. Dale Jamieson (1998). Science, Knowledge, and Animal Minds. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 98 (1):79–102.
    In recent years both philosophers and scientists have been sceptical about the existence of animal minds. This is in distinction to Hume who claimed that '...no truth appears to me more evident, than that beasts are endow'd with thought and reason as well as men'. I argue that Hume is correct about the epistemological salience of our ordinary practices of ascribing mental states to animals. The reluctance of contemporary philosophers and scientists to embrace the view that animals have minds is (...)
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  43. Dale Jamieson & Tom Regan (1982). On the Ethics of the Use of Animals in Science. In Tom Regan & Donald VanDeVeer (eds.), And Justice for All: New Introductory Essays in Ethics and Public Policy. Rowman and Littlefield.
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  44. Linda Johansson (2010). The Philosophy of Animal Minds – Edited by Robert W. Lurz. Theoria 76 (3):274-279.
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  45. John T. Jost, Gráinne Fitzsimons & Aaron C. Kay (2004). The Ideological Animal. In Jeff Greenberg, Sander L. Koole & Tom Pyszczynski (eds.), Handbook of Experimental Existential Psychology. Guilford Press. 263--283.
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  46. Jason Kawall (1999). Bernard E. Rollin, The Unheeded Cry: Animal Consciousness, Animal Pain, and Science Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 19 (4):281-282.
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  47. J. Kiriazis & C. Slobodchikoff (1997). Anthropomorphism and the Study of Animal Language. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. 365--369.
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  48. L. W. Kline (1899). Methods in Animal Psychology. Philosophical Review 8:433.
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  49. Willem A. Landman (1993). Educated Folly About Animal Minds and Animal Suffering. Between the Species 9 (3):7.
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  50. P. Lee (2005). Erica Fudge. Perceiving'animals: Humans and Beasts in Early Modem English Culture. Early Science and Medicine 10 (3):447.
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