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  1. Paul Anand, Prastanta Pattanaik & Clemens Puppe (eds.) (2009). The Handbook of Rational and Social Choice. Oxford University Press, USA.
    The Handbook of Rational and Social Choice provides an overview of issues arising in work on the foundations of decision theory and social choice over the past ...
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  2. Jonny Anomaly (2014). Public Goods and Government Action. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594X13505414.
    It is widely agreed that one of the core functions of government is to supply public goods that markets either fail to provide or cannot provide efficiently. I will suggest that arguments for government provision of public goods require fundamental moral judgments in addition to the usual economic considerations about the relative efficacy of markets and governments in supplying them. While philosophers and policymakers owe a debt of gratitude to economists for developing the theory of public goods, the link between (...)
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  3. Gustaf Arrhenius (2000). An Impossibility Theorem for Welfarist Axiologies. Economics and Philosophy 16 (2):247-266.
    A search is under way for a theory that can accommodate our intuitions in population axiology. The object of this search has proved elusive. This is not surprising since, as we shall see, any welfarist axiology that satisfies three reasonable conditions implies at least one of three counter-intuitive conclusions. I shall start by pointing out the failures in three recent attempts to construct an acceptable population axiology. I shall then present an impossibility theorem and conclude with a short discussion of (...)
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  4. Gustaf Arrhenius & Wlodek Rabinowicz (2005). Value and Unacceptable Risk. Economics and Philosophy 21 (2):177-197.
    Consider a transitive value ordering of outcomes and lotteries on outcomes, which satisfies substitutivity of equivalents and obeys “continuity for easy cases,” i.e., allows compensating risks of small losses by chances of small improvements. Temkin (2001) has argued that such an ordering must also – rather counter-intuitively – allow chances of small improvements to compensate risks of huge losses. In this paper, we show that Temkin's argument is flawed but that a better proof is possible. However, it is more difficult (...)
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  5. Jonathan Baron (1998). Utilitarianism as a Public Philosophy, Robert E. Goodin. Cambridge University Press, 1995, 352 + Xii Pages. Economics and Philosophy 14 (01):151-.
  6. Jonathan Baron (1996). Norm-Endorsement Utilitarianism and the Nature of Utility. Economics and Philosophy 12 (02):165-.
    In this article, I shall suggest an approach to the justification of normative moral principles which leads, I think, to utilitarianism. The approach is based on asking what moral norms we would each endorse if we had no prior moral commitments. I argue that we would endorse norms that lead to the satisfaction of all our nonmoral values or goals. The same approach leads to a view of utility as consisting of those goals that we would want satisfied. In the (...)
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  7. Martin Barrett & Daniel Hausman (1990). Making Interpersonal Comparisons Coherently. Economics and Philosophy 6 (02):293-.
    Many ethical theories, including in particular consequentialist moral the ories, require comparisons of the amount of good possessed or received by different people. In the case of some goods, such as monetary income, wealth, education, or health, such comparisons are relatively unproblematic. Even in the case of such goods there may be serious empirical measurement problems, but there appear to be no difficulties in principle. Thus Cooter and Rappoport (1984) maintained that there was no serious difficulty of making interpersonal utility (...)
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  8. Pierluigi Barrotta (2008). Why Economists Should Be Unhappy with the Economics of Happiness. Economics and Philosophy 24 (2):145-165.
    The economics of happiness is an influential research programme, the aim of which is to change welfare economics radically. In this paper I set out to show that its foundations are unreliable. I shall maintain two basic theses: (a) the economics of happiness shows inconsistencies with the first person standpoint, contrary claims on the part of the economists of happiness notwithstanding, and (b) happiness is a dubious concept if it is understood as the goal of welfare policies. These two theses (...)
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  9. Michael Benedikt (1996). Complexity, Value, and the Psychological Postulates of Economics. Critical Review 10 (4):551-594.
    Abstract Does the contemporary built environment?the ensemble of our humanly created surroundings?make us happy? This question prompts a consideration of the psychological dimensions of economic value, and of Tibor Scitovsky's revisions of standard economic theory. With Scitovsky as a starting point, a model of value based on modern complexity theory and a Maslow?like rendition of human needs can account for some of the more important exceptions to the law of diminished marginal utility, including those that may undermine the built environment (...)
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  10. Thomas A. Boylan & Ruvin Gekker (eds.) (2009). Economics, Rational Choice and Normative Philosophy. Routledge.
    Following Amartya Sen’s insistence to expand the framework of rational choice theory by taking into account ‘non-utility information,’ economists, political scientists and philosophers have recently concentrated their efforts in analysing the issues related to rights, freedom, diversity intentions and equality. Thomas Boylan and Ruvin Gekker have gathered essays that reflect this trend. The particular themes addressed in this volume include: the measurement of diversity and freedom, formal analysis of individual rights and intentions, judgment aggregation under constraints and strategic manipulation in (...)
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  11. David Braybrooke (1990). The Standard of Living, Amartya Sen Et Al. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987, Xiv + 125 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 6 (02):339-.
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  12. Geoffrey Brennan (1998). Economic Analysis and Moral Philosophy, David M. Hausman and Michael S. McPherson. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1996, Xii + 249 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 14 (02):339-.
  13. Geoffrey Brennan & Alan Hamlin (1995). Constitutional Political Economy: The Political Philosophy of Homo Economicus? Journal of Political Philosophy 3 (3):280–303.
  14. Geoffrey Brennan & Loren Lomasky (1985). The Impartial Spectator Goes to Washington: Toward a Smithian Theory of Electoral Behavior. Economics and Philosophy 1 (2):189-211.
  15. Geoffrey Brennan & Daniel Moseley (forthcoming). Economics and Ethics. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    We identify three points of intersection between economics and ethics: the ethics of economics, ethics in economics and ethics out of economics. These points of intersection reveal three types of conversation between economists and moral philosophers that have produced, and may continue to produce, fruitful exchange between the disciplines.
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  16. D. Brock (2011). Cost-Effectiveness and Disability Discrimination – Addendum. Economics and Philosophy 27 (1):97-98.
  17. Ulrich Bröckling (2010). Human Economy, Human Capital : A Critique of Biopolitical Economy. In Ulrich Bröckling, Susanne Krasmann & Thomas Lemke (eds.), Governmentality: Current Issues and Future Challenges. Routledge. 247.
  18. John Broome (1992). Deontology and Economics. Economics and Philosophy 8 (02):269-282.
  19. Campbell Brown (2003). Giving Up Levelling Down. Economics and Philosophy 19 (1):111-134.
  20. Luigino Bruni (2010). Reciprocity: An Economics of Social Relations , Serge C. Kolm. Cambridge University Press, 2008. XI + 390 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 26 (2):241-247.
  21. Allen E. Buchanan (1985). Ethics, Efficiency, and the Market. Rowman & Allanheld.
    This is a systematic evaluation of the main arguments for and against the market as an instrument of social organization, balancing efficiency and justice .
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  22. James M. Buchanan (1988). The Economics of Rights, Co-Operation, and Welfare, Robert Sugden. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986, Vii + 191 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 4 (02):341-.
  23. Ayşe Buğra & Gürol Irzik (1999). Human Needs, Consumption, and Social Policy. Economics and Philosophy 15 (02):187-.
  24. M. Bunge (2007). Book Review: Gintis, H., Bowles, S., Boyd, R., & Fehr, E., Eds. (2005). Moral Sentiments and Material Interests. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Pp. Xii + 404. US $50. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (4):543-547.
  25. Krister Bykvist (2007). The Good, the Bad, and the Ethically Neutral. Economics and Philosophy 23 (1):97-105.
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  26. Philip Cafaro (2001). Economic Consumption, Pleasure, and the Good Life. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (4):471–486.
  27. Bryan Caplan (2005). Toward a New Consensus on the Economics of Socialism: Rejoinder to My Critics. Critical Review 17 (1-2):203-220.
    Abstract This has been an unusually productive exchange. My critics largely accept my main theoretical claims about economic calculation and socialism. They have also started to do what advocates of the Misesian view should have been doing for decades: offer empirical evidence that that the calculation problem is serious. While I continue to believe that incentive problems explain most of the failures of socialism, I am slightly less confident than I was before. Fortunately, there are many unexploited sources of information (...)
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  28. Ian Carter (1995). Interpersonal Comparisons of Freedom. Economics and Philosophy 11 (01):1-.
  29. Ian Carter & Matthew H. Kramer (2008). How Changes in One's Preferences Can Affect One's Freedom (and How They Cannot): A Reply to Dowding and Van Hees. Economics and Philosophy 24 (1):81-96.
  30. Paula Casal (2013). Occupational Choice and the Egalitarian Ethos. Economics and Philosophy 29 (1):3-20.
    G. A. Cohen proposes to eradicate inequality without loss of efficiency or freedom by relying on an egalitarian ethos requiring us to undertake socially useful occupations we would rather not take, and work hard at them, without requesting differential incentive payments. Since the ethos is not legally enforced, Cohen denies it threatens our occupational freedom. Drawing on the work of Joseph Raz, the paper argues that Cohen's proposal threatens our occupational autonomy even if it leaves our legal freedom intact. It (...)
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  31. Thema-Universitede Cergy-Pontoise (1995). Equal Opportunity or Equal Social Outcome? Economics and Philosophy 11:25-55.
    John Rawls's work (1971) has greatly contributed to rehabilitating equality as a basic social value, after decades of utilitarian hegemony,particularly in normative economics, but Rawls also emphasized that full equality of welfare is not an adequate goal either. This thesis was echoed in Dworkin's famous twin papers on equality (Dworkin 1981a,b), and it is now widely accepted that egalitarianism must be selective. The bulk of the debate on ‘Equality of What?’ thus deals with what variables ought to be submitted for (...)
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  32. Flavio Comim & Miriam Teschl (2006). Introduction: Capabilities and Identity. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (3):293-298.
  33. Tyler Cowen (2007). The Importance of Defining the Feasible Set. Economics and Philosophy 23 (1):1-14.
    How should we define the feasible set? Even when individuals agree on facts and values, as traditionally construed, different views on feasibility may suffice to produce very different policy conclusions. Focusing on the difficulties in the feasibility concept may help us resolve some policy disagreements, or at least identify the sources of those disagreements. Feasibility is most plausibly a matter of degree rather than of kind. Normative economic reasoning therefore faces a fuzzy social budget constraint. Iterative reasoning about feasibility and (...)
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  34. Ricardo F. Crespo (2007). 'Practical Comparability' and Ends in Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (3):371-393.
    This paper endeavours to summarize a variety of arguments for a reconsideration of ends in Economics. The logical structure of the rationality of ends (practical rationality) differs from the one of means (instrumental rationality). The paper sets out to explain the differences between both rationalities and some of the implications of incorporating this new emphasis on ends, given that Economics adopts the means rationality. The emergence of the topics of incommensurability and incomparability of ends is presented and a possible way (...)
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  35. Partha Dasgupta (2007). Reply to Putnam and Walsh. Economics and Philosophy 23 (3):365-372.
    Social thinkers frequently remind us that people differ on what constitutes personal well-being, but that even when they don't differ, they disagree over the extent to which one person's well-being can be permitted to be traded off against another's. They tell us that political differences are to be traced to differences in people's conceptions of personal and social well-being. We are given to understand, in other words, that people's ethics differ.
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  36. John Bryan Davis (2003). The Theory of the Individual in Economics: Identity and Value. Routledge.
    The concept of the individual and his/her motivations is a bedrock of philosophy. All strands of thought at heart contain to a particular theory of the individual. Economics, though, is guilty of taking this hugely important concept without questioning how we theorize it. This superb book remedies this oversight. The new approach put forward by Davies is to pay more attention to what moral philosophy may offer us in the study of personal identity, self consciousness and will. This crosses the (...)
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  37. Peter Diamond (1998). Symposium on the Rationing of Health Care: 1 Rationing Medical Care — An Economist's Perspective. Economics and Philosophy 14 (01):1-.
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  38. Peter Dietsch (2012). Éthique et Économie : Introduction. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 7 (3):21-22.
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  39. Kenneth M. Ehrenberg (1999). Social Structure and Responsibility. Loyola Poverty Law Journal 5:1-26.
    We now live in a world with unprecedented possibilities. Technology is quickly reaching the point at which it will be within our grasp to cure any ailment: medical, psychological, or social. Yet we are already falling behind in the curative use of our newfound abilities. With our new technologies we have it within our means to feed the world and to eradicate sicknesses common only in developing countries. However, the use of these *2 abilities is governed by a social system (...)
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  40. Marc Fleurbaey (2012). Économie normative : un regain. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 7 (3):23-29.
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  41. Philippe Fontaine (2007). Harsanyi Before Economics: An Introduction. Economics and Philosophy 23 (3):343-348.
  42. B. S. Frey (2000). Luxury is Fun-but Should Be Taxed A Review of Robert H. Frank's Luxury Fever. Why Money Fails to Satisfy in an Era of Excess. [REVIEW] Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (3):447-448.
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  43. Natalie Gold, Briony Pulford & Andrew Colman (2013). Your Money Or Your Life: Comparing Judgements In Trolley Problems Involving Economic And Emotional Harms, Injury And Death. Economics and Philosophy 29 (02):213-233.
    There is a long-standing debate in philosophy about whether it is morally permissible to harm one person in order to prevent a greater harm to others and, if not, what is the moral principle underlying the prohibition. Hypothetical moral dilemmas are used in order to probe moral intuitions. Philosophers use them to achieve a reflective equilibrium between intuitions and principles, psychologists to investigate moral decision-making processes. In the dilemmas, the harms that are traded off are almost always deaths. However, the (...)
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  44. Robert E. Goodin (2001). The New Social Question: Rethinking the Welfare State, Pierre Rosanvallon. Translated by Barbara Harshav. Princeton University Press, 2000, XII + 139 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 17 (1):121-145.
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  45. David Gordon (2005). Calculation and Chaos: Reply to Caplan. Critical Review 17 (1-2):171-178.
    Abstract Ludwig von Mises argued that (1) economic calculation under socialism is impossible, and that (2) the lack of calculation would entail chaos and starvation. In these pages, Bryan Caplan has accepted the first claim but rejected the second, and has argued further that in real?world attempts to implement socialism, it was the lack of incentives, not the absence of economic calculation, that was responsible for economic chaos. I suggest, against Caplan's interpretation, that by ?chaos? Mises meant the lack of (...)
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  46. Till Grüne-Yanoff (2009). Mismeasuring the Value of Statistical Life. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (2):109-123.
    The value of a statistical life (VSL) is an important tool for cost?benefit analysis of regulatory policies that concern fatality risks. Its proponents claim that it measures people's risk preferences, and that VSL therefore is a tool of vicarious governance. This paper criticizes the revealed preference method for measuring VSL. It specifies three minimal conditions for vicarious governance: sensitivity, fairness and hypothetical compromise, and shows that the VSL measure, in its common application in policy formation and analysis, violates these conditions. (...)
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  47. Francesco Guala (2000). The Logic of Normative Falsification: Rationality and Experiments in Decision Theory. Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (1):59-93.
    The paper investigates how normative considerations influenced the development of the theory of individual decision-making under risk. In the first part, the debate between Maurice Allais and the 'Neo-Bernoullians' (supporting the Expected Utility model) is reconstructed, in order to show that a controversy on the definition of rational decision and on the methodology of normative justification played a crucial role in legitimizing the Allais-paradox as genuinely refuting evidence. In the second part, it is shown how informal notions of rationality were (...)
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  48. Benedetto Gui (2009). On Mutual Benefit and Sacrifice: A Comment on Bruni and Sugden's 'Fraternity'. Economics and Philosophy 25 (2):179-185.
    This note comments on Bruni and Sugden's interesting notion of fraternity among contract partners as joint commitment to cooperate for mutual benefit. I raise two points on their paper, both concerning the role of sacrifice. First I maintain that, differently from other social preferences, guilt aversion (or warm glow) does not imply self-sacrifice. Secondly, I argue that aiming for mutual benefit does not prevent individuals from facing trade-offs between their own and their partnerssacrifices’ enhance cooperative intentions and help create feelings (...)
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  49. Fredrik Hansen (2011). TheStern Reviewand its Critics: Economics at Work in an Interdisciplinary Setting. Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (3):255-270.
    The Stern Review, Stern (2007), received a lot of attention upon its release. It also resulted in an intense and interesting debate within climate change economics. One of the central issues has been the question of the appropriate discount rate to use and more generally the proper role of ethics in an economic analysis of this kind. Some have argued against incorporating ethical considerations at all, while others argue that Stern did not involve ethics enough. There are also those who (...)
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  50. Sven Ove Hansson (2006). Economic (Ir)Rationality in Risk Analysis. Economics and Philosophy 22 (2):231-241.
    Mainstream risk analysis deviates in at least two important respects from the rationality ideal of mainstream economics. First, expected utility maximization is not applied in a consistent way. It is applied to endodoxastic uncertainty, i.e. the uncertainty (or risk) expressed in a risk assessment, but in many cases not to metadoxastic uncertainty, i.e. uncertainty about which of several competing assessments is correct. Instead, a common approach to metadoxastic uncertainty is to only take the most plausible assessment into account. This will (...)
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