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Normative Ethics

Edited by Jussi Suikkanen (University of Birmingham)
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  1. added 2015-01-28
    James Bernard Murphy (forthcoming). Does Habit Interference Explain Moral Failure? Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-19.
    Social psychologists have performed many well-known experiments demonstrating that experimental subjects will perform in ways that are normatively inconsistent even across very similar situations. Situationist social psychologists and philosophers have often interpreted these findings to imply that most people lack general moral dispositions. These situationists have argued that our moral dispositions are at best narrowly local traits; they often describe our moral characters as fragmented. In this paper, I offer an alternative hypothesis for the same experimental results. I argue that (...)
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  2. added 2015-01-28
    Chris Tucker (forthcoming). Satisficing and Motivated Submaximization (in the Philosophy of Religion). Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    In replying to certain objections to the existence of God, Robert Adams, Bruce Langtry, and Peter van Inwagen assume that God can appropriately choose a suboptimal world, a world less good than some other world God could have chosen. A number of philosophers, such as Michael Slote and Klaas Kraay, claim that these theistic replies are therefore committed to the claim that satisficing can be appropriate. Kraay argues that this commitment is a significant liability. I argue, however, that the relevant (...)
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  3. added 2015-01-28
    Desh Raj Sirswal (2014). Swami Vivekananda , Indian Youth and Value Education. In Atanu Mohapatra (ed.), Vivekananda and Contemporary Education in India: Recent Perspectives. Surendra Publications. 167-180.
    Swami Vivekananda (January 12, 1863 – July 4, 1902) is considered as one of the most influential spiritual educationist and thinker of India. He was disciple of Ramakrishna Paramahamsa and the founder of Ramakrishna Math and Ramakrishna Mission. He is considered by many as an icon for his fearless courage, his positive exhortations to the youth, his broad outlook to social problems, and countless lectures and discourses on Vedanta philosophy. For him, “Education is not the amount of information that is (...)
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  4. added 2015-01-27
    Walid Mansour, Khoutem Ben Jedidia & Jihed Majdoub (2015). How Ethical is Islamic Banking in the Light of the Objectives of Islamic Law? Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (1):51-77.
    Islamic banking is based on moral foundations that make it distinct from conventional banking. Some argue that because of its foundation in Islam, Islamic banking may represent a more morally appealing alternative. Yet, evidence shows that this is not the case. Indeed, the current practice of Islamic banking has not been able to achieve its goals which are based on Islam's moral values: to enhance justice, equitability, and social well-being. This essay examines the extent to which Islamic banking is ethical (...)
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  5. added 2015-01-27
    Christopher Vecsey (2015). Navajo Morals and Myths, Ethics and Ethicists. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (1):78-121.
    Over a century ago a Western observer recognized an effective morality among Navajo Indians in the American Southwest, yet could not locate its expression, except in mythology recounting contradictory behaviors. Through the 1900s scholars delineated contours of Navajo moral values, myths, and taxonomies upon which moral traditions were based, and situations in which Navajos have engaged in ethical decision-making. Recently individual Navajos have manifested their role as ethical agents, not merely as recipients of moral lore. A contemporary Navajo storyteller, Sunny (...)
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  6. added 2015-01-27
    Kristopher Norris (2015). Deliberating Just War. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (1):178-184.
    This essay responds to James Turner Johnson's critiques of my argument in “‘Never Again War’: Recent Shifts in the Roman Catholic Just War Tradition and the Question of ‘Functional Pacifism.’” . It attends specifically to three of Johnson's objections and offers accounts of the meaning and use of the term “functional pacifism,” an understanding of classic just war thought as a tradition, and the concepts of peace and authority within just war and pacifist thought. It argues that my analysis of (...)
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  7. added 2015-01-27
    Yonatan Brafman (2015). Yeshayahu Leibowitz's Axiology. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (1):146-168.
    This essay explicates and assesses Yeshayahu Leibowitz's axiology, and its relation to the value he claims halakhic practice instantiates: service of God. It argues that, while Leibowitz often affirms a relativist “polytheism of values,” he sometimes implies that the religious value is the “most valuable value.” However, this is not due to its material content, because serving God is objectively best; rather it is because, consonant with his negative theology, it most fully instantiates the formal properties of a value. The (...)
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  8. added 2015-01-27
    James Turner Johnson (2015). Getting It Right. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (1):170-177.
    In addition to noting significant differences of interpretation between me and Kristopher Norris on understanding classic just war thought and judging its importance, this Comment flags errors of fact and faulty logic in the Norris essay.
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  9. added 2015-01-27
    Peter Seipel (2015). Aquinas and the Natural Law. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (1):28-50.
    Recent decades have seen a shift away from the traditional view that Aquinas's theory of the natural law is meant to supply us with normative guidance grounded in a substantive theory of human nature. In the present essay, I argue that this is a mistake. Expanding on the suggestions of Jean Porter and Ralph McInerny, I defend a derivationist reading of ST I-II, Q. 94, A. 2 according to which Aquinas takes our knowledge of the genuine goods of human life (...)
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  10. added 2015-01-27
    Jonathan K. Crane (2015). Praying to Die. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (1):1-27.
    Prayer has long been a staple in the proverbial Jewish medical toolbox. While the vast majority of relevant prayers seek renewed health and prolonged life, what might prayers for someone to die look like? What ethical dimensions are involved in such liturgical expressions? By examining both prayers for oneself to die and prayers for someone else to die, this essay discerns reasons why it may be good and even necessary to pray for a patient's demise.
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  11. added 2015-01-27
    David Newheiser (2015). Sexuality and Christian Tradition. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (1):122-145.
    This essay aims to clarify the debate over same-sex unions by comparing it to the fourth-century conflict concerning the nature of Jesus Christ. Although some suppose that the council of Nicaea reiterated what Christians had always believed, the Nicene theology championed by Athanasius was a dramatic innovation that only won out through protracted struggle. Similarly, despite the widespread assumption that Christian tradition univocally condemns homosexuality, the concept of sexuality is a nineteenth-century invention with no exact analogue in the ancient world. (...)
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  12. added 2015-01-26
    Alfred Archer (forthcoming). Divine Moral Goodness, Supererogation and The Euthyphro Dilemma. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-14.
    How can we make sense of God’s moral goodness if God cannot be subject to moral obligations? This question is troubling for divine command theorists, as if we cannot make sense of God’s moral goodness then it seems hard to see how God’s commands could be morally good. Alston argues that the concept of supererogation solves this problem. If we accept the existence of acts that are morally good but not morally required then we should accept that there is no (...)
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  13. added 2015-01-26
    Dimitrios Dentsoras (2014). The Birth of Supererogation. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):351-372.
    The essay investigates the philosophical infancy of the idea that some actions are morally praiseworthy while not being morally obligatory. It focuses on Thomas Aquinas’s distinction between commandments and counsels, the early Christian idea that some acts go beyond nature, and the Stoic notion of circumstantially appropriate actions. I discuss the Christian and Stoic justification of acts of self-denial, such as celibacy, poverty, and martyrdom, and attempt to find a unitary source of goodness and moral obligation that allows for such (...)
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  14. added 2015-01-26
    Stuart Silvers (2010). Methodological and Moral Muddles in Evolutionary Psychology. Journal of Mind and Behavior 31 (1-2).
    Evolutionary psychology, the self-proclaimed scientific theory of human nature, owes much of its controversial notoriety to reports in public media. In part this is because of its bold claims that human psychological characteristics are adaptations to the Pleistocene environment in which they evolved and these inherited characteristics we exhibit now constitute our human nature. Proponents maintain that evolutionary psychology is a scientific account of human nature that explains what this much abused concept means. Critics counter that some evolutionary psychological hypotheses (...)
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  15. added 2015-01-26
    Steven Wall (2000). Darwinian Natural Right: The Biological Ethics of Human Nature by Larry Arnhart. Albany: SUNY Press, 1998. [REVIEW] Reason Papers 25:113-116.
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  16. added 2015-01-26
    Ken Binmore (1998). Evolutionary Ethics. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 5:277-283.
    Philosophers used to say that all their endeavours were merely a footnote to Plato. In ethics, this is still largely true.
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  17. added 2015-01-26
    Robert Wesson & Patricia A. Williams (1995). Evolution and Human Values. Rodopi.
    Initiated by Robert Wesson, Evolution and Human Values is a collection of newly written essays designed to bring interdisciplinary insight to that area of thought where human evolution intersects with human values. The disciplines brought to bear on the subject are diverse - philosophy, psychiatry, behavioral science, biology, anthropology, psychology, biochemistry, and sociology. Yet, as organized by co-editor Patricia A. Williams, the volume falls coherently into three related sections. Entitled "Evolutionary Ethics," the first section brings contemporary research to an area (...)
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  18. added 2015-01-26
    James G. Paradis & George Christopher Williams (1989). Evolution and Ethics: T.H. Huxley's Evolution and Ethics with New Essays on its Victorian and Sociobiological Context. Princeton University Press.
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  19. added 2015-01-26
    Roger Smith (1972). Alfred Russel Wallace: Philosophy of Nature and Man. British Journal for the History of Science 6 (2):177-199.
    Historians of the Victorian period have begun to re-evaluate the general background and impact of Darwin's theory of the origin of species by means of natural selection. An emerging picture suggests that the Darwinian theory of evolution was only one aspect of a more general change in intellectual positions. It is possible to summarize two correlated developments in the second half of the nineteenth century: the seculariszation of majors areas of thought, and the increasing breakdown of a common intellectual milieu. (...)
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  20. added 2015-01-23
    Walter Glannon (2011). Brain, Body, and Mind: Neuroethics with a Human Face. Oxford University Press.
    This book is a discussion of the most timely and contentious issues in the two branches of neuroethics: the neuroscience of ethics; and the ethics of neuroscience. Drawing upon recent work in psychiatry, neurology, and neurosurgery, it develops a phenomenologically inspired theory of neuroscience to explain the brain-mind relation. The idea that the mind is shaped not just by the brain but also by the body and how the human subject interacts with the environment has significant implications for free will, (...)
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  21. added 2015-01-22
    Douglas W. Portmore, Acts, Attitudes, and Rational Control.
    I argue that when determining whether an agent ought to perform an act, we should not hold fixed the fact that she’s going to form certain attitudes (and, here, I’m concerned with only reasons-responsive attitudes such as beliefs, desires, and intentions). For, as I argue, agents have, in the relevant sense, just as much control over which attitudes they form as which acts they perform. This is important because what effect an act will have on the world depends not only (...)
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  22. added 2015-01-22
    Richard Oxenberg, Philosopher Kings and the Kingdom of Ends: On Democracy's Need for a Moral-Civic Pedagogy.
    The Athenian statesman Pericles makes one of the first, and most eloquent, statements concerning the meaning of democracy in his funeral oration of 430 B.C.E.: "Our constitution is called a democracy because power is in the hands not of a minority but of the whole people. When it is a question of settling private disputes, everyone is equal before the law; when it is a question of putting one person before another in positions of public responsibility, what counts is. . (...)
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  23. added 2015-01-22
    Richard Oxenberg, Love and Death in the First Epistle of John: A Phenomenological Reflection.
    “Whoever does not love abides in death,” writes John in his first epistle (1Jn 3:10). The statement, on the face of it, presents us with a paradox. Death, so we suppose, is precisely that in which one cannot abide. To ‘abide’ is to live in, to make one’s home in. Our first thought is to interpret this as metaphor. John is saying that a life devoid of love is a life somehow like death. And yet a moment’s reflection reveals that (...)
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  24. added 2015-01-22
    Richard Oxenberg, The Lure of the Advertising Image: A Platonic Analysis.
    Sut Jhally begins his essay “Advertising at the Edge of the Apocalypse” with the following provocative claim: “20th century advertising is the most powerful and sustained system of propaganda in human history and its cumulative effects, unless quickly checked, will be responsible for destroying the world as we know it.” Jhally argues that the advertising industry, in fostering an association between human aspiration and desire for consumable goods, creates an artificial demand for such goods that is, at once, far in (...)
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  25. added 2015-01-19
    Nancy E. Snow (forthcoming). Comments on Intelligent Virtue: Outsmarting Situationism. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-10.
    Situationism is the view, now familiar in contemporary ethics, that virtue ethics is empirically inadequate. The central complaint is that virtues are global or robust traits, that is, traits that are deeply entrenched parts of personality manifested in regular behavior across different types of situations, and that a wealth of social psychological experiments show either that such traits do not exist, or are so scarce that they are not significant factors in producing behavior. Specific situationist complaints take a variety of (...)
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  26. added 2015-01-19
    J. P. Messina & Chris W. Surprenant (forthcoming). Situationism and the Neglect of Negative Moral Education. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    This paper responds to the recent situationist critique of practical rationality and decision-making. According to that critique, empirical evidence indicates that our choices are governed by morally irrelevant situational factors and not durable character traits, and rarely result from overt rational deliberation. This critique is taken to indicate that popular moral theories in the Western tradition are descriptively deficient, even if normatively plausible or desirable. But we believe that the situationist findings regarding the sources of, or influences over, our moral (...)
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  27. added 2015-01-18
    Michele Bocchiola (forthcoming). Nicholas Southwood: Contractualism and the Foundations of Morality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
    In the contemporary philosophical debate, there are two opposing contractualist views. On the one side, Hobbesian contractualisms take moral principles as side-constraints to redress the failures of the interaction among self-interested individuals. On the other, Kantian versions of the social contract ground morality on an impartial and moralized viewpoint. In his recent Contractualism and the Foundations of Morality, Nicholas Southwood proposes a third and novel form of contractualism, with the aim to overcome the “implausibly personal and partial characterization of the (...)
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  28. added 2015-01-18
    Joseph M. Grcic, Rawls and Rousseau on the Social Contract.
  29. added 2015-01-18
    Tim Mulgan (2011). Ethics for a Broken World: Imagining Philosophy After Catastrophe. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Preface : imagining a broken world -- Philosophy in the age of affluence -- pt. I. Rights -- Nozick on rights -- Self-ownership -- The Lockean proviso -- Nozick in a broken world -- Nationalism -- pt. II. Utilitarianism -- Act utilitarianism -- Rule utilitarianism -- Well-being and value -- Mill on liberty -- Utilitarianism and future people -- Utilitarianism in a broken world -- pt. III. The social contract -- Hobbes and Locke -- Rawls -- Rawls and the future (...)
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  30. added 2015-01-18
    Mitchell Aboulafia (1981). Behavior Modification and "Punishment" of the Innocent. [REVIEW] Journal of Thought 16 (1).
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  31. added 2015-01-17
    Joseph Shieber (2015). A Philosophical Introduction to Testimony. Routledge.
    The epistemology of testimony has experienced a growth in interest over the last twenty-five years that has been matched by few, if any, other areas of philosophy. Testimony: A Philosophical Introduction provides an epistemology of testimony that surveys this rapidly growing research area while incorporating a discussion of relevant empirical work from social and developmental psychology, as well as from the interdisciplinary study of knowledge-creation in groups. The past decade has seen a number of scholarly monographs on the epistemology of (...)
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  32. added 2015-01-17
    Nomy Arpaly (2014). Duty, Desire and the Good Person: Towards a Non‐Aristotelian Account of Virtue. Philosophical Perspectives 28 (1):59-74.
    This paper presents an account of the virtuous person, which I take to be the same as the good person. I argue that goodness in a person is based on her desires. Contra Aristotelians, I argue that one does not need wisdom to be good. There can be a perfectly good person with mental retardation or autism. Contra Kantians, I argue that the sense of duty - which does exist! - is compatible with a desire-based moral psychology.
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  33. added 2015-01-12
    F. Battaglia (2012). Anthropologia Transscendentalis. Kant's Theory of Human Nature. Archives Italiennes de Biologie 218 (230).
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  34. added 2015-01-12
    James G. Hart (2009). Who One Is, Book 2: Existenz and Transcendental Phenomenology. Springer.
    Book 1 focused on transcendental-phenomenological ontology and distinguished the non-sortal from the propertied personal sense of ourselves. I can be aware of myself and refer to myself without it being necessary to think of any third-personal characteristic. Book 2 addresses the other richer sense of ourself when we respond to "Who are you?" where the answer might be in terms of an anguished question of identity or the ethical what sort of person am I? It might also be the normative (...)
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  35. added 2015-01-11
    Fuat Gursozlu (2014). Pluralism, Identity, and Violence. In Gail Presbey Greg Moses (ed.), Peace Philosophy and Public Life. Rodopi. 93-109.
  36. added 2015-01-10
    Nicolas Delon (2014). Moral Status, Final Value, and Extrinsic Properties. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 114 (3pt3):371-379.
    Starting from a distinction between intrinsic and final value, I explore the implications of the supervenience of final value on extrinsic properties regarding moral status. I make a case for ‘extrinsic moral status’ based on ‘extrinsic final value’. I show that the assumption of ‘moral individualism’, that moral status supervenes merely on intrinsic properties, is misguided, and results from a conflation of intrinsic with final value. I argue that at least one extrinsic property, namely vulnerability, can be the basis of (...)
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  37. added 2015-01-09
    Tobias Keiling (2014). What Phenomenology Ought to Be. Research in Phenomenology:281-300.
    Steven Crowell’s rich book is an eminent advance in the interpretation of Husserl and Heidegger, in thinking about the nature of phenomenology as a way of philosophical inquiry, and in accessing the contribution phenomenology can make to philosophy in general. Just as its predecessor Husserl, Heidegger, and the Space of Meaning (2001) has not stood uncontested—the review by Taylor Carman, for instance, is very critical—Crowell’s new book on normativity is also likely to spur debate. But such debate should be most (...)
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  38. added 2015-01-09
    Tobias Keiling (2013). Phänomenologische Freiheit in Husserls Ideen... In Diego D'Angelo, Sylvaine Gourdain, Tobias Keiling & Nikola Mirkovic (eds.), Frei sein, frei handeln. Freiheit zwischen theoretischer und praktischer Philosophie. Alber. 243-271.
    Dem phänomenologischen Philosophieren liegt ein spezifisches Verständnis von Freiheit zugrunde, an dem sich eine negative und eine positive Seite unterscheiden lassen. Negativ ist die phänomenologische Freiheit die Freiheit von philosophischen Vorurteilen, positiv eine Freiheit zum philosophischen Neuanfang. Sie benennt die Fähigkeit, sich in einer Erfahrungssituation auf das für diese Situation Wesentliche einzulassen, dieses philosophisch zu erfassen und entsprechend zu handeln. Aufgrund dieser Kontinuität im Phänomen der Freiheit selbst lässt sich die phänomenologische Freiheit weder allein als negative, noch allein als positive (...)
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  39. added 2015-01-07
    Hannes Rusch (2015). Do Bankers Have Deviant Moral Attitudes? Negative Results From a Tentative Survey. Rationality, Markets and Morals 5:6-20.
    Bankers have a reputation for deviating from standard morals. It is an open question, though, if this claim can be substantiated. Here, it is tested directly if bankers respond differently to moral dilemmas. Evaluations of the moral acceptableness of behavioural options in two trolley cases by bankers (n = 23) are compared to those of ordinary people (n = 274). An apparent difference in response behaviour between the groups can be fully explained by a difference in the response behaviour of (...)
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  40. added 2015-01-06
    Desh Raj Sirswal, दर्शन, सृजनात्मकता और मानवीय सम्बन्ध (Philosophy, Creativity and Human Relations).
    सारांश -/- मानवीय-सम्बन्ध सदियों से दर्शन और साहित्य के अध्ययन का मुख्य विषय रहा है. जब भी हम मानवीय सम्बन्धों के विवेचन पर जाते है तब हम इनकी प्रकृति, व्यक्तिगत और सामाजिक सम्बन्धों की प्रमाणिकता के सम्बन्ध में बात करते हैं और हम केवल दार्शनिक विचारों तक ही सीमित नहीं रहते बल्कि हमें मनोविज्ञानिकों, समाजशास्त्रियों, राजनीतिक विचारकों के साथ-साथ साहित्यकारों द्वारा दी गयी व्याख्याओं का भी अध्ययन करना पड़ता है क्यूंकि यह अन्तर्रविषयी अध्ययन का विषय है. जब भी मानवीय सम्बन्धों (...)
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  41. added 2015-01-06
    Katrina Sifferd (forthcoming). Virtue Ethics and Criminal Punishment. In Jon Webber & Alberto Masala (eds.), From Personality to Virtue. OUP.
    In this chapter I use virtue theory to critique certain contemporary punishment practices. From the perspective of virtue theory, respect for rational agency indicates a respect for choice-making as the process by which we form dispositions which in turn give rise to further choices and action (Pincoffs 1980). To be a moral agent one must be able to act such that his or her actions deserve praise or blame; virtue theory thus demands that moral agents engage in rational choice-making as (...)
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  42. added 2015-01-06
    Luca Bertolino (2014). Mi impegno? Ci impegniamo! L'anelito del soggetto e il coro dei soggetti erranti. In Anna Marina Mariani (ed.), Impegnarsi. Adulti e giovani: nessuno escluso. edizioni junior. 35-42.
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  43. added 2015-01-06
    Luca Bertolino (2014). "Mi impegno". Note sull'"anelito" del soggetto. Nuova Secondaria 31 (10):46-50.
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  44. added 2015-01-05
    Cynthia Willett (2014). Interspecies Ethics. Columbia University Press.
    Interspecies Ethics explores animals' vast capacity for agency, justice, solidarity, humor, and communication across species. The social bonds diverse animals form provide a remarkable model for communitarian justice and cosmopolitan peace, challenging the human exceptionalism that drives modern moral theory. Situating biosocial ethics firmly within coevolutionary processes, this volume has profound implications for work in social and political thought, contemporary pragmatism, Africana thought, and continental philosophy. -/- Interspecies Ethics develops a communitarian model for multispecies ethics, rebalancing the overemphasis on competition (...)
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  45. added 2015-01-05
    Luca Bertolino (2008). L'uomo «cittadino di due mondi». Sviluppi in Rosenzweig di temi kantiani. In Mario Signore & Giovanni Scarafile (eds.), La natura umana tra determinismo e libertà. Edizioni Messaggero. 151-184.
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  46. added 2015-01-04
    Christine Tappolet (forthcoming). Values and Emotions. In Iwao Hirose & Jonas Olson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Value Theory.
    Evaluative concepts and emotions appear closely connected. According to a prominent account, this relation can be expressed by propositions of the form ‘something is admirable if and only if feeling admiration is appropriate in response to it’. The first section discusses various interpretations of such ‘Value-Emotion Equivalences’, for example the Fitting Attitude Analysis, and it offers a plausible way to read them. The main virtue of the proposed way to read them is that it is well-supported by a promising account (...)
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  47. added 2015-01-04
    Christine Tappolet (2011). Les Mauvaises Émotions. In Fabrice Teroni, Christine Tappolet & Anita Konzelman Ziv (eds.), Les Ombres de l'âme. Penser les émotions négatives. 37-51.
    Emotions have long been accused of all sorts of mischief. In recent years, however, many have argued that far from constituting an obstacle to reason and morality, emotions possess important virtues. According to a plausible conception, emotions would have a crucial cognitive function: they would consist in the perceptual experience of evaluative properties. To fear a dog, for instance, would consist in having the perceptual experience of the dog as fearsome. There has been and still is a lively debate about (...)
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  48. added 2015-01-03
    William A. Edmundson, Do Animals Need Citizenship?
    An ambitious proposal by Sue Donaldson and Will Kymlicka seeks to break out of an impasse that animal-rights advocacy seems to have reached. They divide the animal kingdom into three categories and distribute rights accordingly. Domesticated animals are to be treated as citizens, enjoying the same rights and duties as human citizens (adjusting for relevant differences in ability, just as we do for children and the severely cognitively handicapped). Wild animal species are to be treated as sovereign nations having rights (...)
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  49. added 2014-12-30
    T. J. Kasperbauer (forthcoming). Rejecting Empathy for Animal Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.
    Ethicists have become increasingly skeptical about the importance of empathy in producing moral concern for others. One of the main claims made by empathy skeptics is a psychological thesis: empathy is not the primary psychological process responsible for producing moral concern. Some of the best evidence that could confirm or disconfirm this thesis comes from research on empathizing with animals. However, this evidence has not been discussed in any of the prominent critiques of empathy. In this paper, I investigate six (...)
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  50. added 2014-12-30
    Jenifer Booth, Pre-Modern Ethics, Authoritative Narratives, and the Tribunal. The Oxford Handbook of Psychiatric Ethics.
    This chapter applies the modified philosophy of Alasdair MacIntyre to mental health law, and in particular to the mental health tribunal. The natural law approach of Thomas Aquinas is used to assist in this. It is argued that, for law to be just in pre-modern terms, it requires that it be assessed as rational together with the care it supports as a single entity. As such, according to a modified version of the Thomistic Aristotelian ethics of MacIntyre, justice would require (...)
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