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Normative Ethics

Edited by Jussi Suikkanen (University of Birmingham)
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  1. added 2016-12-07
    Algander Per & Andrew Reisner, Prioritarianism and Single-Person Cases.
    In this paper we argue that the use of survey data or intuitions about single person cases as a dialectically neutral data point for favouring telic egalitarianism over prioritarianism has dim prospects for success. We take as a case study Otsuka and Voorhoeve (2009)'s now well known paper and show that it either is either argumentatively irrelevant or question-begging, depending on whether the survey data about people's judgements concerning single-person cases is interpreted as being prudential or moral in character. We (...)
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  2. added 2016-12-07
    Alfred Archer (forthcoming). Integrity and the Value of an Integrated Self. Journal of Value Inquiry.
    What is integrity and why is it valuable? One account of the nature of integrity, proposed by John Cottingham amongst others, is The Integrated Self View. On this account integrity is a formal relation of coherence between various aspects of a person. One problem that has been raised against this account is that it isn’t obvious that it can account for the value of integrity. In this paper I will respond to this problem by providing an account of the value (...)
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  3. added 2016-12-06
    Jeremy Fischer (2016). The Ethics of Reflexivity: Pride, Self-Sufficiency, and Modesty. Philosophical Papers 45 (3):365-399.
    This essay develops a framework for understanding what I call the ethics of reflexivity, that is, the norms that govern attitudes and actions with respect to one’s own worth. I distinguish five central aspects of the reflexive commitment to living in accordance with one’s personal ideals: the extent to which and manner in which one regards oneself from an evaluative point of view, the extent to which one cares about receiving the respect of others, the degree to which one interprets (...)
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  4. added 2016-12-04
    G. Cavallo (2014). Legge e diritto naturale in Alasdair MacIntyre. Il Pensare:24-34.
    This paper focuses on the theme of natural rights, as it emerges from the works of Alasdair MacIntyre. In "After Virtue" he argues that «there are no such rights, and belief in them is one with belief in witches and in unicorns», but in later works he endorsed a thomistic view on natural law, which is compatible with the acknowledgment of universal human rights. MacIntyre’s writings contain the premises for an ontological foundation of natural rights, despite his rejection of any (...)
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  5. added 2016-12-01
    Jonathan Way (forthcoming). Creditworthiness and Matching Principles. In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics, Volume 7. Oxford University Press
    You are creditworthy for φ-ing only if φ-ing is the right thing to do. Famously though, further conditions are needed too – Kant’s shopkeeper did the right thing, but is not creditworthy for doing so. This case shows that creditworthiness requires that there be a certain kind of explanation of why you did the right thing. The reasons for which you act – your motivating reasons – must meet some further conditions. In this paper, I defend a new account of (...)
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  6. added 2016-11-30
    Kathryn J. Norlock (2016). The Challenges of Extreme Moral Stress: Claudia Card's Contributions to the Formation of Nonideal Ethical Theory. Metaphilosophy 47 (4-5):488-503.
    Open Access: This essay argues that Claudia Card numbers among important contributors to nonideal ethical theory, and it advocates for the worth of NET. Following philosophers including Lisa Tessman and Charles Mills, the essay contends that it is important for ethical theory, and for feminist purposes, to carry forward the interrelationship that Mills identifies between nonideal theory and feminist ethics. Card's ethical theorizing assists in understanding that interrelationship. Card's philosophical work includes basic elements of NET indicated by Tessman, Mills, and (...)
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  7. added 2016-11-29
    Christian Miller, Berlin Heather & Shermer Michael (2016). The Moral Animal: Virtue, Vice, and Human Nature. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences:39-56.
    Steve Paulson, executive producer and host of To the Best of Our Knowledge, moderated a discussion with philosopher Christian Miller, neuroscientist Heather Berlin, and historian of science Michael Shermer to examine our moral ecology and its influence on our underlying assumptions about human nature.
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  8. added 2016-11-28
    Finlay Malcolm (forthcoming). How to Insult and Compliment a Testifier. Episteme.
    Do we insult, offend or slight a speaker when we refuse her testimony? Do we compliment, commend or extol a speaker when we accept her testimony? I argue that the answer to both of these questions is “yes”, but only in some instances, since these respective insults and compliments track the reasons a hearer has for rejecting or accepting testimony. When disbelieving a speaker, a hearer may insult her because she judges the speaker to be either incompetent as a knower (...)
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  9. added 2016-11-28
    Joel Michael Reynolds (2016). Toward a Critical Theory of Harm: Ableism, Normativity, and Transability (BIID). APA Newsletter on Philosophy and Medicine 16 (1):37-45.
    Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID) is a very rare condition describing those with an intense desire or need to move from a state of ability to relative impairment, typically through the amputation of one or more limbs. In this paper, I draw upon research in critical disability studies and philosophy of disability to critique arguments based upon the principle of nonmaleficence against such surgery. I demonstrate how the action-relative concept of harm in such arguments relies upon suspect notions of biological (...)
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  10. added 2016-11-28
    Christian Miller (2016). In Defense of a Supernatural Foundation to Morality: Reply to Shermer. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences:91-96.
    In my original paper, I claimed that our moral obligations are real, objective, and grounded in the supernatural. In particular, I endorsed the claim that God's will is the basis or source of our moral obligations, where “God” is to be understood as the theistic being who is omnibenevolent, omniscient, and omnipotent, who created the universe, and who is still actively involved in the universe after creating it. In his critical article, Michael Shermer has raised a number of important challenges (...)
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  11. added 2016-11-26
    Christian Miller (2016). On Shermer On Morality. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences:63-68.
    This paper is part of a six paper exchange with Michael Shermer. This is my critical commentary on Michael Shermer's paper “Morality is real, objective, and natural.” Shermer and I agree that morality is both real and objective. Here I raise serious reservations about both Shermer's account of where morality comes from and his account of what morality tells us to do. His approach to the foundations of morality would allow some very disturbing behaviors to count as moral, and his (...)
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  12. added 2016-11-26
    Christian Miller (2016). Morality is Real, Objective, and Supernatural. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences:74-82.
    This paper is part of a six paper exchange with Michael Shermer. Section one explains how “God” is meant to be understood. Section two then introduces the position that morality depends in some way upon God. Section three turns to some of the leading arguments for this view. Finally, we will conclude with the most powerful challenge to this approach, namely what has come to be called the Euthyphro Dilemma.
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  13. added 2016-11-25
    Christian Miller (forthcoming). Rationalism and Intuitionism. In Mark Timmons, Karen Jones & Aaron Zimmerman (eds.), Routledge Handbook on Moral Epistemology. Routledge
    One of the liveliest areas in moral psychology in recent years has been research on the extent to which conscious reasoning leads to the formation of moral judgments. The goal of this chapter is to review and briefly assess three of the leading positions today on this topic - traditional rationalism, social intuitionism, and morphological rationalism - each of which has significant implications for moral epistemology.
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  14. added 2016-11-25
    Patrick Kaczmarek (forthcoming). How Much is Rule-Consequentialism Really Willing to Give Up to Save the Future of Humanity? Utilitas:1-11.
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  15. added 2016-11-25
    Christian Miller (forthcoming). How Contemporary Psychology Supports Central Elements of Simḥah Zissel’s Picture of Character. Journal of Jewish Ethics.
    This is my contribution to a book symposium on Professor Geoffrey Claussen’s book, Sharing the Burden: Rabbi Simḥah Zissel Ziv and the Path of Musar. I focus on just two topics that figure prominently in Professor Claussen’s book: human nature and the virtue of love.
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  16. added 2016-11-25
    Christian B. Miller (2016). On Kristjánsson on Aristotelian Character Education. Journal of Moral Education 45 (4):490-501.
    I pursue three of the many lines of thought that were raised in my mind by Kristjánsson’s engaging book. In the first section, I try to get clearer on what exactly Aristotelian character education (ACE) is, and suggest areas where I hope the view is developed in more detail. In the second and longest section, I draw some lessons from social psychology about the pervasive role of what I call ‘Surprising Dispositions,’ and invite Kristjánsson to take up the difficult challenge (...)
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  17. added 2016-11-24
    Victoria I. Burke (forthcoming). Conscience Exemptions in Medicine: A Hegelian Feminist Perspective. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2).
    In this article, I defend the view that conscience exemption clauses for medical practitioners (doctors, nurses, technicians, pharmacists) should be limited by patient protection clauses. This view was also defended by Mark Wicclair, in his book on conscience exemptions in medicine (2011). In this article, I defend Wicclair’s view by supplementing it with Hegelian ethical theory and feminist critical theory. Conscience exemptions are important to support as a matter of human rights. They support an individual’s right to protect their deepest (...)
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  18. added 2016-11-23
    Desh Raj Sirswal (2016). Role of Religions in Imparting Social Justice in Indian Socio-Political Context. Milestone Education Review 7 (02).
    Religion is a deriving force for social change in India since ancient times. Although we boast about ancient Indian ideals of social stratification, which made a long lasting discrimination within society, and most of the times we do not do any justice to social-political life of a billion peoples. The study of the relation between religion and politics showed that this relation always made a problematic situation for the indigenous people and always benefitted invaders. The idea of the interface or (...)
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  19. added 2016-11-23
    Ben Eggleston (2014). Act Utilitarianism. In Ben Eggleston & Dale E. Miller (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Utilitarianism. Cambridge University Press 125-145.
    An overview of act utilitarianism: the basic idea of it, historical and contemporary sources, supporting arguments, and objections, with a closing section on indirect utilitarianism.
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  20. added 2016-11-23
    Ben Eggleston & Dale E. Miller (2014). Introduction. In Ben Eggleston & Dale E. Miller (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Utilitarianism. Cambridge University Press 1-15.
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  21. added 2016-11-22
    Robert J. Hartman (forthcoming). Accepting Moral Luck. In Ian Church (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Theories of Luck.
    I argue for the view that certain kinds of luck in results, circumstances, and constitutive properties can partially determine an agent’s praiseworthiness and blameworthiness. To make this view clearer, consider some examples. Two agents drive recklessly, and one but not the other kills a pedestrian. Two corrupt judges would freely take a bribe if one were offered. But only one judge is offered a bribe, and so only one judge takes a bribe. Put in terms of these examples, I argue (...)
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  22. added 2016-11-22
    Kathryn J. Norlock (forthcoming). Real Imaginal Relationships with the Dead. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-16.
    Open Access: Appreciating the relationship of the living to our dead is an aspect of human life that seems to be neglected in philosophy. I argue that living individuals can have ongoing, non-imaginary, valuable relationships with deceased loved ones. This is important to establish because arguments for such relationships better generate claims in applied ethics about our conduct with respect to our dead. In the first half of the paper I advance the narrower claim that psychological literature affirmative of “imaginal (...)
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  23. added 2016-11-21
    David K. Chan (2008). After Anscombe. In Moral Psychology Today: Essays on Values, Rational Choice, and the Will. Springer 141-154.
    In "After Anscombe," I argue that, although Bratman's account of intention "has provided a conceptual tool for many directions of research in philosophy and cognitive psychology," it cannot do the work in ethics that moral philosophers, especially Kantians, use it for. This can be shown by considering the problems in using intention to make a moral distinction in cases of double effect. If so, Bratman's is not the same concept of intention that Anscombe had in mind when she wrote her (...)
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  24. added 2016-11-20
    James Edwin Mahon (2013). A Double-Edged Sword: Honor in The Duellists. In Alan Barkman, Ashley Barkman & Nancy King (eds.), The Culture and Philosophy of Ridley Scott. Lexington Books 45-60.
    In this essay I argue that Ridley Scott's first feature film, The Duelists, which is an adaptation of a Joseph Conrad novella, contains his deepest meditation on honor in his entire career. The film may be said to answer the following question about honor: is being bound to do something by honor, when it is contrary to one's self-interest, a good thing, or a bad thing? It may be said to give the answer that it may be either good or (...)
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  25. added 2016-11-19
    Sarah K. Paul (forthcoming). Good Intentions and the Road to Hell. Philosophical Explorations.
    G.E.M. Anscombe famously remarked that an adequate philosophy of psychology was needed before we could do ethics. Fifty years have passed, and we should now ask what significance our best theories of the psychology of agency have for moral philosophy. My focus is on non-moral conceptions of autonomy and self-governance that emphasize the limits of deliberation -- the way in which one's cares render certain options unthinkable, one's intentions and policies filter out what is inconsistent with them, and one's resolutions (...)
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  26. added 2016-11-19
    Nathan Stout (forthcoming). Salience, Imagination, and Moral Luck. Philosophical Papers.
    In this paper, I begin by addressing the way in which T.M. Scanlon's account of blame aims to solve the problem of moral luck by appealing to the significance of an agent’s actions. I then attempt to show that this solution to the problem fails in an important way insofar as there may be cases of outcome luck in which one’s being a member of a particular relationship with normative standards is itself a matter of luck. After presenting this challenge, (...)
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  27. added 2016-11-18
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). A Theory of National Reconciliation: Some Insights From Africa. In Aleksandar Fatic & Klaus Bachmann (eds.), Transition without Justice (tentative title). TBA
    Reprint of a chapter that initially appeared in _Theorizing Transitional Justice_ (2015).
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  28. added 2016-11-18
    Thomas Pölzler (forthcoming). Are Moral Judgements Adaptations? Three Reasons Why It Is so Difficult to Tell. South African Journal of Philosophy.
    An increasing number of scholars argue that moral judgements are adaptations, i.e., that they have been shaped by natural selection. Is this hypothesis true? In this paper I shall not attempt to answer this important question. Rather, I pursue the more modest aim of pointing out three difficulties that anybody who sets out to determine the adaptedness of moral judgments should be aware of (though some so far have not been aware of). First, the hypothesis that moral judgements are adaptations (...)
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  29. added 2016-11-17
    Jeremy Dunham & Holly Lawford-Smith (forthcoming). Offsetting Race Privilege. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy.
    For all the talk there has been lately about privilege, few have commented on the moral obligations that are associated with having privilege. Those who have commented haven't gone much beyond the idea that the privileged should be conscious of their privilege, should listen to those who don't have it. Here we want to go further, and build an account of the moral obligations of those with a particular kind of privilege: race privilege. In this paper we articulate an understanding (...)
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  30. added 2016-11-16
    Jonathan Phillips, Christian Mott, Julian De Freitas, June Gruber & Joshua Knobe (forthcoming). True Happiness: The Role of Morality in the Folk Concept of Happiness. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.
    Recent scientific research has settled on a purely descriptive definition of happiness that is focused solely on agents’ psychological states (high positive affect, low negative affect, high life satisfaction). In contrast to this understanding, recent research has suggested that the ordinary concept of happiness is also sensitive to the moral value of agents’ lives. Five studies systematically investigate and explain the impact of morality on ordinary assessments of happiness. Study 1 demonstrates that moral judgments influence assessments of happiness not only (...)
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  31. added 2016-11-16
    Caleb Cohoe (2016). Getting Things Less Wrong: Religion and the Role of Communities in Successfully Transmitting Beliefs. Res Philosophica 93 (3):621-636.
    I use the case of religious belief to argue that communal institutions are crucial to successfully transmitting knowledge to a broad public. The transmission of maximally counterintuitive religious concepts can only be explained by reference to the communities that sustain and pass them on. The shared life and vision of such communities allows believers to trust their fellow adherents. Repeated religious practices provide reinforced exposure while the comprehensive and structured nature of religious worldviews helps to limit distortion. I argue that (...)
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  32. added 2016-11-15
    Frédéric Minner (2015). From Indignation to Norms Against Violence in Occupy Geneva: A Case Study for the Problem of the Emergence of Norms. Social Science Information 54 (4):497-524.
    Why and how do norms emerge? Which norms emerge and why these ones in particular? Such questions belong to the ‘problem of the emergence of norms’, which consists of an inquiry into the production of norms in social collectives. I address this question through the ethnographic study of the emergence of ‘norms against violence’ in the political collective Occupy Geneva. I do this, first, empirically, with the analysis of my field observations; and, second, theoretically, by discussing my findings. In consequence (...)
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  33. added 2016-11-12
    Daniel J. McKaughan (2015). Character Traits and the Neuroscience of Social Behavior. In Christian R. Miller, Michael Furr, Angela Knobel & William Fleeson (eds.), Character: New Directions from Philosophy, Psychology, and Theology. Oxford University Press
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  34. added 2016-11-11
    Laura Papish (forthcoming). CAPS Psychology and the Empirical Adequacy of Aristotelian Virtue Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    For the past decade and a half, Aristotelians have tried to counter the following criticism articulated by John Doris: if we look at personality and social psychology research, we must conclude that we generally neither have, nor have the capacity to develop, character traits of the kind envisioned by Aristotle and his followers. Some defenses of Aristotelian virtue ethics proceed by trying to insulate it from this challenge, while others have tried to dissipate the force of Doris's critique by showing (...)
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  35. added 2016-11-08
    Kok-Chor Tan (forthcoming). The Contours of Toleration: A Relational Account. In Manuel Knoll & Stephen Snyder (eds.), New Perspectives on Distributive Justice. De Gruyter
    I outline what I call a relational account of toleration. This relational account helps explain the apparent paradox of toleration in that it involves two competing moral stances, of acceptance and disapproval, towards the tolerated. It also helps clarify the way toleration is a normative ideal, and not a position one is forced into out of the practical need to accommodate or accept. Specifically, toleration is recommended out of respect for that which the tolerant agent also disapproves of. This combination (...)
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  36. added 2016-11-08
    Svein Tvedt Johansen, Marcus Selart & Kjell Grønhaug (2013). The Effects of Risk on Initial Trust Formation. Journal of Applied Social Psychology 43:1185-1199.
    This paper seeks to expand our understanding of initial trust by looking at how variation in risk influences the nature of trust and the process of initial trust formation. Four hypotheses were tested in two experiments involving participants with and without work experience. A first hypothesis suggested a positive relationship between a general propensity to trust and initial trust; a second hypothesis, a negative relationship between risk and initial trust; whereas a third hypothesis posited that risk would increase the importance (...)
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  37. added 2016-11-08
    Svein Tvedt Johansen & Marcus Selart (2005). Expanding the Role of Trust in the Management of Organizational Change. In Rune Lines, Inger Stensaker & Ann Langley (eds.), New perspectives on organizational change and learning. Vigmostad & Bjørke 259-280.
    Trust has a great potential for furthering our understanding of organizational change and learning. This potential however remains largely untapped. It is argued that two reasons as for why this potential remains unrealized are: (i) A narrow conceptualization of change as implementation and (ii) an emphasis on direct and aggregated effects of individual trust to the exclusion of other effects. It is further suggested that our understanding of the effects of trust on organizational change, should benefit from including effects of (...)
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  38. added 2016-11-07
    Stefano Bacin (forthcoming). Kant and Feder on the Will, Happiness, and the Aim of Moral Philosophy. In Corey W. Dyck & Falk Wunderlich (eds.), Kant and His German Contemporaries. Cambridge University Press
  39. added 2016-11-07
    G. Cavallo (forthcoming). Genealogical Inquiry and Universal Moral Values. Dialegesthai. Rivista Telematica di Filosofia 2017.
    Inspired by american pragmatism and Hans Joas' proposal of an affirmative genealogy, I argue in this paper that a genealogical inquiry (both on the biografical and on the historical level) can explain what motivates individuals to moral agency better than Kantian moral philosophy, without renouncing an historically-informed conception of universal moral values.
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  40. added 2016-11-07
    Daniele Bertini (forthcoming). Introduction to Moral Heteronomy. History, Proposals, Arguments. Dialegesthai. Rivista Telematica di Filosofia 2017.
    An introduction to how heteronomous views address the topic of moral autonomy. In the first section I provide a short history of the rise of the autonomy stance in meta ethics. Then I sketch the relationship between Kant and mainstream contemporary Kantians. I finally outline a summary of the papers in the special issue of Dialegesthai.
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  41. added 2016-11-07
    Michael Burke, Anezka Kuzmicova, Anne Mangen & Theresa Schilhab (2016). Empathy at the Confluence of Neuroscience and Empirical Literary Studies. Scientific Study of Literature 6 (1):6-41.
    The objective of this article is to review extant empirical studies of empathy in narrative reading in light of (i) contemporary literary theory, and (ii) neuroscientific studies of empathy, and to discuss how a closer interplay between neuroscience and literary studies may enhance our understanding of empathy in narrative reading. An introduction to some of the philosophical roots of empathy is followed by tracing its application in contemporary literary theory, in which scholars have pursued empathy with varying degrees of conceptual (...)
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  42. added 2016-11-07
    Adrian M. S. Piper (2012). Kant's Self-Legislation Procedure Reconsidered. Kant Studies Online 2012:203-277.
    Most published discussions in contemporary metaethics include some textual exegesis of the relevant contemporary authors, but little or none of the historical authors who provide the underpinnings of their general approach. The latter is usually relegated to the historical, or dismissed as expository. Sometimes this can be a useful division of labor. But it can also lead to grave confusion about the views under discussion, and even about whose views are, in fact, under discussion. Elijah Millgram’s article, “Does the Categorical (...)
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  43. added 2016-11-06
    Xingming Hu (forthcoming). A Critical Survey of Some Recent Philosophical Research in China. Philosophia:1-28.
    In this paper, I survey some recent literature produced by the established Chinese philosophers who regularly publish in Chinese philosophy journals and work in Mainland China. Specifically, I review the recent research of these philosophers in two areas: Chinese Philosophy and epistemology. In each area, I focus on two topics that have caught the attention of a lot of Chinese philosophers. I argue that the Chinese philosophers’ research on these topics has two prevalent problems: (i) a lot of arguments they (...)
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  44. added 2016-11-05
    Omar Farahat (2016). Commands as Divine Attributes. Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):581-605.
    Theories of ethics that attempt to incorporate divine speech or commands as necessary elements in the construction of moral obligations are often viewed as vulnerable to a challenge based on the so-called Euthyphro dilemma. According to this challenge, opponents of theistic ethics suppose that divine speech either informs one of a preexisting set of values and obligations, which makes it inconsequential, or is entirely arbitrary, which makes it irrational. This essay analyzes some of the debates on the nature of divine (...)
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  45. added 2016-11-05
    Matthew Puffer (2016). Retracing Augustine's Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):685-720.
    Augustine's exposition of the image of God in Book 15 of On The Trinity sheds light on multiple issues that arise in scholarly interpretations of Augustine's account of lying. This essay argues against interpretations that posit a uniform account of lying in Augustine—with the same constitutive features, and insisting both that it is never necessary to tell a lie and that lying is absolutely prohibited. Such interpretations regularly employ intertextual reading strategies that elide distinctions and developments in Augustine's ethics of (...)
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  46. added 2016-11-05
    Karen Lebacqz (2016). On Hope and Hard Choices. Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):722-737.
    In Handle with Care, novelist Jodi Picoult presents a heartbreaking case involving the question of wrongful birth. This essay examines Ronald M. Green's writings in the field of bioethics to see what wisdom they might bring to this case. I argue that Green's contributions to bioethics exemplify some of the best of ethical argumentation: attention to facts, discernment of morally relevant differences, enunciation and justification of principles, originality, and compassion. I then draw from his work three foci that illuminate aspects (...)
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  47. added 2016-11-05
    Anton Luis Sevilla (2016). The Buddhist Roots of Watsuji Tetsurô's Ethics of Emptiness. Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):606-635.
    Watsuji Tetsurô is famous for having constructed a systematic socio-political ethics on the basis of the idea of emptiness. This essay examines his 1938 essay “The Concept of ‘Dharma’ and the Dialectics of Emptiness in Buddhist Philosophy” and the posthumously published The History of Buddhist Ethical Thought, in order to clarify the Buddhist roots of his ethics. It aims to answer two main questions which are fundamentally linked: “Which way does Watsuji's legacy turn: toward totalitarianism or toward a balanced theory (...)
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  48. added 2016-11-05
    Ronald M. Green (2016). Response to Karen Lebacqz and Stephen Palmquist. Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):752-759.
    I respond here to the essays by Karen Lebacqz and Stephen Palmquist, beginning with my debt of gratitude to Lebacqz for her understanding of the methodological depth I try to bring to the analysis of bioethical issues. I further illustrate that observation here by reviewing the logic of my approach to the issue of wrongful life. At the same time, in connection with human genetic enhancement, I acknowledge that I may have not properly appreciated the seriousness of the problem of (...)
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  49. added 2016-11-05
    Stephen R. Palmquist (2016). The Paradox of Inwardness in Kant and Kierkegaard. Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):738-751.
    Aside from bioethics, the main theme of Ronald Green's lifework has been an exploration of the relation between religion and morality, with special emphasis on the philosophies of Immanuel Kant and Søren Kierkegaard. This essay summarizes and assesses his work on this theme by examining, in turn, four of his relevant books. Religious Reason introduced a new method of comparative religion based on Kant's model of a rational religion. Religion and Moral Reason expanded on this project, clarifying that religious traditions (...)
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  50. added 2016-11-05
    Michael D. K. Ing (2016). Two Virtuous Actions Cannot Both Be Completed. Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):659-684.
    This essay highlights an alternative tradition of understanding value conflicts in early Confucian thought. In contrast to a prominent position among interpreters that argues for the resolvability or harmonization of conflicting values, I argue that some early Confucians conceptualized value conflicts as irresolvable. In other words, when meaningful aspects of a situation come into tension with each other and values are threatened to be either left unfulfilled or harmed, early Confucians put forth a variety of views. Some believed that all (...)
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