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Normative Ethics

Edited by Jussi Suikkanen (University of Birmingham)
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  1. added 2016-09-27
    Joel Michael Reynolds (2016). Infinite Responsibility in the Bedpan: Response Ethics, Care Ethics, and the Phenomenology of Dependency Work. Hypatia 31 (3):n/a-n/a.
    Because Levinas understands ethical response as a response to the radical alterity of the other, he contrasts it with justice, for which alterity becomes a question of equality. Drawing upon the practice of dependency work and the insights of feminist care ethics, I argue that the opposition between responding to another's singularity and leveling it via parity-based principles is belied in the experience of care. Through a hermeneutic phenomenology of caring for my post-stroke grandfather, I develop an account of dependency (...)
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  2. added 2016-09-27
    John Mizzoni (2016). Evolution and the Foundations of Ethics: Evolutionary Perspectives on Contemporary Normative and Metaethical Theories. Lexington Books.
    This book outlines the rich array of work being done with evolution and ethics by biologists, zoologists, paleontologists, philosophers, theologians, psychologists, and political scientists. John Mizzoni argues that we can understand ethical elements more deeply through an evolutionary perspective and ten theories of ethics.
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  3. added 2016-09-27
    Robert C. Bishop (2016). Review of The Evolution of Ethics: Human Sociality and the Emergence of Ethical Mindedness. [REVIEW] Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 36 (3):190-197.
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  4. added 2016-09-27
    Bernd Lahno (2014). Challenging the Majority Rule in Matters of Truth. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 7 (2):54-72.
    The majority rule has caught much attention in recent debate about the aggregation of judgments. But its role in finding the truth is limited. A majority of expert judgments is not necessarily authoritative, even if all experts are equally competent, if they make their judgments independently of each other, and if all the judgments are based on the same source of (good) evidence. In this paper I demonstrate this limitation by presenting a simple counterexample and a related general result. I (...)
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  5. added 2016-09-27
    Stephen R. Brown, Naturalized Virtue Ethics.
    In Chapter 5, I place NVE is the space of contemporary virtue theories and also contrast it with eudaimonistic or welfare-based ethics and with evolutionary ethics. NVE is a good-based virtue theory, but it is neither a kind of eudaimonism nor an evolutionary ethics. Considerations of evolution lead us to certain criticisms of ethical theories like NVE. Contra the critics, I show NVE's compatibility with neo-Darwinism. I then suggest further research.
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  6. added 2016-09-27
    Bernd Lahno (2009). Verantwortlich Handeln. Zeitschrift Für Management 4:75-94.
    Für moderne Handlungskontexte erweist sich der klassische Verantwortungsbegriff als inadäquat. Ein alternatives Konzept der Verantwortung, das auf der Humeschen Theorie der künstlichen Tugenden basiert, wird entwickelt und an einem einfachen Koordinationsspiel illustriert. Verantwortung wird dabei als das Resultat eines sozialen Zuschreibungsprozesses bestimmt. Menschen, denen Verantwortung zugeschrieben wird, erfüllen eine Funktion als Bezugspunkt sozialer Koordination. Es wird argumentiert, dass eine solche Konzeption gegenüber der klassischen ein feineres und angemesseneres Verständnis des Verhältnisses von kausaler Urheberschaft und Verantwortung vermittelt. Einige Schlussfolgerungen mit Blick (...)
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  7. added 2016-09-27
    Bernd Lahno (2007). Comment On: Werner Güth, Hartmut Kliemt, Vittoria Levati and George von Wangenheim: On the Co-Evolution of Retribution and Trustworthiness. Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 163 (1):163-166.
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  8. added 2016-09-27
    Michael Baurmann, Bernd Lahno, Uwe Matzat & Anton Leist (eds.) (2004). Trust and Community on the Internet. Lucius & Lucius (Analyse Und Kritik 26(1).
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  9. added 2016-09-27
    Bernd Lahno (1995). Versprechen. Oldenbourg.
  10. added 2016-09-26
    Bill Wringe (forthcoming). Punishment Forgiveness and Reconciliation. Philosophia.
    It is sometimes thought that the normative justification for responding to large-scale violations of human rights via the judicial appararatus of trial and punishment is undermined by the desirability of reconciliation between conflicting parties as part of the process of conflict resolution. I take there to be philosophical, as well as practical and psychological issues involved here: on some conceptions of punishment and reconciliation, the attitudes that they involve conflict with one another on rational grounds. But I shall argue that (...)
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  11. added 2016-09-26
    Bill Wringe (forthcoming). Punishment Forgiveness and Reconciliation. Philosophia.
    It is sometimes thought that the normative justification for responding to large-scale violations of human rights via the judicial appararatus of trial and punishment is undermined by the desirability of reconciliation between conflicting parties as part of the process of conflict resolution. I take there to be philosophical, as well as practical and psychological issues involved here: on some conceptions of punishment and reconciliation, the attitudes that they involve conflict with one another on rational grounds. But I shall argue that (...)
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  12. added 2016-09-26
    Robert Shaver (2016). Sidgwick on Pleasure. Ethics 126:901-928.
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  13. added 2016-09-26
    Guy Kahane, Evolution and Impartiality.
    Lazari-Radek and Singer argue that evolutionary considerations can resolve Sidgwick’s dualism of practical reason, because such considerations debunk moral views that give weight to self-interested or partial considerations, but cannot threaten the principle Universal Benevolence. I argue that even if we grant these claims, this appeal to evolution is ultimately self-defeating. Lazari-Radek and Singer face a dilemma. Either their evolutionary argument against partial morality succeeds, but then we need to also give up our conviction that suffering is bad; or there (...)
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  14. added 2016-09-26
    Stephen J. Pope (2011). Human Evolution and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Can the origins of morality be explained entirely in evolutionary terms? If so, what are the implications for Christian moral theology and ethics? Is the latter redundant, as socio-biologists often assert? Stephen Pope argues that theologians need to engage with evolutionary theory rather than ignoring it. He shows that our growing knowledge of human evolution is compatible with Christian faith and morality, provided that the former is not interpreted reductionistically and the latter is not understood in fundamentalist ways. Christian ethics (...)
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  15. added 2016-09-26
    Stephen J. Pope (2007). Human Evolution and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Can the origins of morality be explained entirely in evolutionary terms? If so, what are the implications for Christian moral theology and ethics? Is the latter redundant, as socio-biologists often assert? Stephen Pope argues that theologians need to engage with evolutionary theory rather than ignoring it. He shows that our growing knowledge of human evolution is compatible with Christian faith and morality, provided that the former is not interpreted reductionistically and the latter is not understood in fundamentalist ways. Christian ethics (...)
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  16. added 2016-09-22
    James Bardis (2013). Poetry and Truth in the Tale of the Purple People Eater. Http://Www.Asdreams.Org/Conference-Recordings/ 2013.
    A report on the pioneering of a new pedagogy designed to challenge students to use and improve their memory, increase their awareness of logical fallacies and tacitly embedded contradiction(s) and sensitize them to the deeply symbolic nature of thought in all its expressions (math, logos, music, picture and motor skills), as created, by the author, from in situ research at a senior level (ESL) course in Storytelling at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, South Korea’s premier university for foreign languages and (...)
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  17. added 2016-09-21
    David McCarthy (forthcoming). The Priority View. Economics and Philosophy.
    According to the priority view, or prioritarianism, it matters more to benefit people the worse off they are. But how exactly should the priority view be defined? This article argues for a highly general characterization which essentially involves risk, but makes no use of evaluative measurements or the expected utility axioms. A representation theorem is provided, and when further assumptions are added, common accounts of the priority view are recovered. A defense of the key idea behind the priority view, the (...)
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  18. added 2016-09-21
    Ferdinand Fellmann (2009). Philosophie der Lebenskunst. Junius.
    Philosophie der Lebenskunst beschreibt ein noch unvollendetes Projekt der Zusammenführung zweier Typen von Ethik: der antiken Tugendethik und der modernen Sollensethik. Dieser Band beschreibt die wechselvolle Geschichte der konkreten Anwendung ethischer Reflexion an einzelnen Autoren wie Epikur und Seneca, Montaigne und Gracian, Schopenhauer und Nietzsche bis zu Erich Fromm und Michel Foucault. Auch ostasiatische Weisheitslehren finden in der Darstellung Berücksichtigung. Das Resultat ist ein lebensphilosophischer Begriff moralischer Verpflichtung, die sich aus der Spannung zwischen dem Glücksstreben und der Glücksfähigkeit des Menschen (...)
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  19. added 2016-09-19
    Neal A. Tognazzini (forthcoming). Regretting the Impossible. In Jacob Goodson (ed.), William James, Moral Philosophy, and the Moral Life: The Cries of the Wounded. Rowman & Littlefield
    In his classic essay, "The Dilemma of Determinism", William James argues that the truth of determinism would make regret irrational. Given the central role of regret in our moral lives, James concludes that determinism is false. In this paper I explore the attitude of regret and show that James's argument is mistaken. Not only can we rationally regret events that were determined to occur, but we can also rationally regret events that had to occur.
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  20. added 2016-09-19
    Kevin Timpe & Neal A. Tognazzini (forthcoming). Pride in Christian Philosophy and Theology. In J. Adam Carter Emma C. Gordon (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Pride. Rowman & Littlefield
    Our focus in this chapter will be the role the pride has played, both historically and contemporarily, in Christian theology and philosophical theology. We begin by delineating a number of different types of pride, since some types are positive (e.g., when a parent tells a daughter “I’m proud of you for being brave”), and others are negative (e.g., “Pride goes before a fall”) or even vicious. We then explore the role that the negative emotion and vice play in the history (...)
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  21. added 2016-09-19
    Ryan Jenkins (forthcoming). Rule Consequentialism and Moral Relativism in Advance. Journal of Philosophical Research.
    Rule consequentialism is usually taken to recommend a single ideal code for all moral agents. Here I argue that, depending on their theoretical mo- tivations, some rule consequentialists have good reasons to be relativists. Rule consequentialists who are moved by consequentialist considerations ought to support a scheme of multiple relativized moral codes because we could expect such a scheme to have better consequences in terms of impartial aggregate well- being than a single universal code. Rule consequentialists who nd compelling the (...)
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  22. added 2016-09-19
    A. Snoek & C. L. Fry (2015). Lessons in Biopolitics and Agency: Agamben on Addiction. The New Bioethics 21 (2):128–141.
    The concepts of 'biopolitics' and 'naked life' have become increasingly relevant in the debate on substance dependency due to the growing prominence of neuroscience in defining the nature of addiction1 and its threat to agency. However, these concepts are not necessarily well understood, and therefore may lead to oversight rather than insight. In this article we review the literature on Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben, whose founding works on both concepts shed a different light on addiction. We argue that the current (...)
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  23. added 2016-09-19
    Kyle G. Fritz & Daniel Miller (2015). Hypocrisy and the Standing to Blame. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    Hypocrites are often thought to lack the standing to blame others for faults similar to their own. Although this claim is widely accepted, it is seldom argued for. We offer an argument for the claim that nonhypocrisy is a necessary condition on the standing to blame. We first offer a novel, dispositional account of hypocrisy. Our account captures the commonsense view that hypocrisy involves making an unjustified exception of oneself. This exception-making involves a rejection of the impartiality of morality and (...)
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  24. added 2016-09-19
    Vanessa Carbonell (2015). Differential Demands. In Marcel van Ackeren & Michael Kuhler (eds.), The Limits of Moral Obligation: Moral Demandingness and Ought Implies Can. Routledge 36-50.
    If the traditional problem of demandingness is that a theory demands too much of all agents, for example by asking them to maximize utility in every decision, then we should ask whether there is a related problem of “differential demandingness”, when a theory places vastly different demands on different agents. I argue that even according to common-sense morality, the demands faced by particular agents depend on a variety of contingent factors. These include the general circumstances, the compliance of others, the (...)
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  25. added 2016-09-14
    Mohan Parasain (2016). On Moral Law and Quest for Selfhood. Routledge.
    This book offers an original intersection of concepts from Immanuel Kant’s moral command ethics and Søren Kierkegaard’s existential ethics. The Kantian formulation of moral law is based on theoretical ground while Kierkegaardian ethics of the quest for selfhood views it as the very act of living. The present work provides an account of both these perspectives and questions whether these approaches to morality are mutually exclusionary. Using Slavoj Žižek’s ‘parallax view’ in the realm of morality, it argues that moral philosophy (...)
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  26. added 2016-09-13
    William Lauinger (forthcoming). The Morality-Welfare Circularity Problem. Philosophical Studies:1-23.
    Various moral theories are essentially welfare-involving in that they appeal to the promotion or the respect of well-being in accounting for the moral rightness of at least some acts. Further, various theories of well-being are essentially morality-involving in that they construe well-being in a way that essentially involves morality in some form or other. It seems that, for any moral theory that is essentially welfare-involving and that relies on a theory of well-being that is essentially morality-involving, a circularity problem may (...)
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  27. added 2016-09-12
    Christopher Cowley (ed.) (2015). Supererogation: Volume 77. Cambridge University Press.
    According to its simplest definition, supererogation means freely and intentionally doing good beyond the requirements of duty. A more complex definition incorporates the responses of third parties: the supererogatory act is one that is praiseworthy if performed, but not blameworthy if omitted, as long as one does one's duty. This collection of essays, based on papers delivered at the Royal Institute of Philosophy's Annual Conference in Dublin in June 2014, explores a broad range of philosophical problems that stem from various (...)
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  28. added 2016-09-12
    David Heyd (2009). Supererogation. Cambridge University Press.
    Actions that go 'beyond the call of duty' are a common though not commonplace part of everyday life - in heroism, self-sacrifice, mercy, volunteering, or simply in small deeds of generosity and consideration. Almost universally they enjoy a high and often unique esteem and significance, and are regarded as, somehow, peculiarly good. Yet it is not easy to explain how - for if duty exhausts the moral life there is no scope to praise supererogatory acts, and if the consequentialist is (...)
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  29. added 2016-09-10
    Uriah Kriegel & Mark Timmons (forthcoming). The Phenomenology of Kantian Respect for Persons. In R. Dean & O. Sensen (eds.), Respect.
    Emotions can be understood generally from two different perspectives: (i) a third-person perspective that specifies their distinctive functional role within our overall cognitive economy and (ii) a first-person perspective that attempts to capture their distinctive phenomenal character, the subjective quality of experiencing them. One emotion that is of central importance in many ethical systems is respect (in the sense of respect for persons or so-called recognition-respect). However, discussions of respect in analytic moral philosophy have tended to focus almost entirely on (...)
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  30. added 2016-09-09
    Marc A. Cohen (2015). Capital Failure: Rebuilding Trust in Financial Services, Ed. Nicholas Morris and David Vines. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. 329 Pp. ISBN: 978-0-19-871222-0. [REVIEW] Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (3):405-409.
  31. added 2016-09-08
    Andrew T. W. Hung (2013). Tu Wei-Ming and Charles Taylor on Embodied Moral Reasoning. Philosophy, Culture, and Traditions 3:199-216.
    This paper compares the idea of embodied reasoning by Confucian Tu Wei-Ming and Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor. They have similar concerns about the problems of secular modernity, that is, the domination of instrumental reason and disembodied rationality. Both of them suggest that we have to explore a kind of embodied moral reasoning. I show that their theories of embodiment have many similarities: the body is an instrument for our moral knowledge and self-understanding; such knowledge is inevitably a kind of bodily (...)
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  32. added 2016-09-07
    Brandon Boesch (2016). A MacIntyrean Critique of Theoretical Pluralism in Applied Ethics. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (9):41-43.
    According to the work of Alasdair MacIntyre, there is an incommensurability between different theories of normative ethics. MacIntyre’s view on the incommensurability of ethical discourse casts doubt upon the pluralistic proposal of Magelssen and colleagues, since the insights gained from the various theories will themselves be incommensurate with one another. However, since there are obvious benefits provided both by arguments for pluralism and the insights of Magelssen and colleagues, I utilize some later work of MacIntyre to offer an alternative means (...)
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  33. added 2016-09-06
    Alex Worsnip (forthcoming). Explanatory Indispensability and Deliberative Indispensability: Against Enoch's Analogy. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy.
    In a crucial chapter of his important book "Taking Morality Seriously", David Enoch offers a highly inventive argument for metanormative realism, the view that there are objective irreducibly normative truths. The argument appeals to the idea that irreducibly normative truths are indispensable for deliberation. This, Enoch claims, justifies us in believing in irreducibly normative truths. In making this argument, Enoch draws upon an analogy with the indispensability of other entities for explanation, and the idea that we are justified in believing (...)
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  34. added 2016-09-06
    Seth Lazar (2013). Associative Duties and the Ethics of Killing in War. Journal of Practical Ethics 1 (1):3-48.
    This paper advances a novel account of part of what justifies killing in war, grounded in the duties we owe to our loved ones to protect them from the severe harms with which war threatens them. It discusses the foundations of associative duties, then identifies the sorts of relationships, and the specific duties that they ground, which can be relevant to the ethics of war. It explains how those associative duties can justify killing in theory—in particular how they can justify (...)
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  35. added 2016-09-05
    Alejandra Mancilla (forthcoming). Veganism. In Paul B. Thompson & David M. Kaplan (eds.), Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics. Springer
  36. added 2016-09-05
    Alfred Thomas Mckay Archer, Beyond Duty: An Examination and Defence of Supererogation.
    Many accept that there are some acts that are ‘supererogatory’ or ‘beyond the call of duty’. Risking one’s life to save others or dedicating one’s life to helping the needy are often thought to be examples of such acts. Accepting the possibility of acts of this sort raises interesting problems for moral philosophy, as many moral theories appear to leave no room for the supererogatory. While these problems are increasingly recognized in moral philosophy, there remain a number of debates that (...)
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  37. added 2016-09-05
    Alex Gregory (2016). Normative Reasons as Good Bases. Philosophical Studies 173 (9):2291-2310.
    In this paper, I defend a new theory of normative reasons called reasons as good bases, according to which a normative reason to φ is something that is a good basis for φing. The idea is that the grounds on which we do things—bases—can be better or worse as things of their kind, and a normative reason—a good reason—is something that is just a good instance of such a ground. After introducing RGB, I clarify what it is to be a (...)
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  38. added 2016-09-05
    Scott Berman (2014). Prudence and Morality: Socrates Versus Moral Philosophers. South African Journal of Philosophy 33 (4):381-394.
  39. added 2016-09-05
    Raymond Aaron Younis (2014). Neuroscience, Virtues, Ethics, Compassion and the Question of Character. In Michael A. Peters & Belsey Tina (eds.), Education and Philosophies of Engagement. PESA 80-92.
    There has been much debate recently about the meaning, place and function of “character” and “character traits” in Virtue Ethics. For example, a number of philosophers have argued recently that Virtue Ethics would be strengthened as a theory by the omission of talk of character traits; recent neuroscientific studies have suggested that there is scope for scepticism about the existence of such traits. I will argue that both approaches are flawed and unconvincing: in brief, the first approach tends to be (...)
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  40. added 2016-09-05
    Raymond Aaron Younis (1995). Isabelle Eberhardt. In Scott Murray (ed.), Australian film 1978-1994. Oxford University Press
  41. added 2016-09-05
    Raymond Aaron Younis (1993). Jane Campion's The Piano. Cinema Papers 95 (October):50-52.
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  42. added 2016-09-04
    Christian Miller (forthcoming). Honesty. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Christian Miller (eds.), Moral Psychology, Volume V: Virtue and Character. MIT Press
    No one in philosophy has paid much attention to the virtue of honesty in recent years. Here is a trait for which it is easy to find consensus that it is a virtue, and furthermore, a very important virtue. It also has obvious relevance to what we see going on in contemporary politics, for instance, or in sports, the entertainment world, and education. Yet as far as I can tell, only one article in a philosophy journal has appeared in several (...)
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  43. added 2016-09-04
    Christian Miller (forthcoming). Honesty Revisited: More Conceptual and Empirical Reflections. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Christian Miller (eds.), Moral Psychology, Volume V: Virtue and Character. MIT Press
    I am very grateful to Jason Baehr and Bella DePaulo for the careful attention they have paid to my chapter. As I noted, this is my initial foray into providing a conceptual account of the virtue of honesty, and for that matter it is about the only such attempt any philosopher has offered in the past forty years. If others start to go down this road too, I would be thrilled. -/- Following the structure of my paper, I will start (...)
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  44. added 2016-09-01
    Kathryn J. Norlock (ed.) (2017). The Moral Psychology of Forgiveness. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    The feeling that one can’t get over a moral wrong is challenging even in the best of circumstances. This volume considers challenges to forgiveness in the most difficult circumstances. It explores forgiveness in criminal justice contexts, under oppression, after genocide, when the victim is dead or when bystanders disagree, when many different negative reactions abound, and when anger and resentment seem preferable and important.
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  45. added 2016-09-01
    Robert J. Hartman (2017). In Defense of Moral Luck: Why Luck Often Affects Praiseworthiness and Blameworthiness. Routledge.
    There is a contradiction in our idea of moral responsibility. In one strand of our thinking, we believe that a person can become more blameworthy by luck. Consider some examples in order to make that idea concrete. Two reckless drivers manage their vehicles in the same way, and one but not the other kills a pedestrian. Two corrupt judges would each freely take a bribe if one were offered. By luck of the courthouse draw, only one judge is offered a (...)
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  46. added 2016-08-31
    J. Adam Carter & Ian M. Church (forthcoming). On Epistemic Consequentialism and the Virtue Conflation Problem. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy.
    Addressing the ‘virtue conflation’ problem requires the preservation of intuitive distinctions between virtue types, i.e., between intellectual and moral virtues. According to one influential attempt to avoid this problem proposed by Julia Driver (2003), moral virtues produce benefits to others—in particular, they promote the well-being of others—while the intellectual virtues, as such, produce epistemic good for the agent. We show that Driver’s demarcation of intellectual virtue, by adverting to the self/other distinction, leads to a reductio, and ultimately, that the prospects (...)
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  47. added 2016-08-30
    Diana Tietjens Meyers (forthcoming). Professor Emerita. Metaphilosophy.
    Claudia Card did not live long enough to complete her work on surviving evils. Yet she left us an invaluable body of work on this topic. This paper surveys Card’s views about the nature of evils and the ethical quandaries of surviving them. It then develops an account of survival agency that is based on Card’s insights and in keeping with the agentic capacities exercised by Yezidi women and girls who have escaped from ISIS’s obscene program of trafficking in women (...)
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  48. added 2016-08-28
    Benjamin Lange (forthcoming). Restricted Prioritarianism or Competing Claims? Utilitas.
    I here settle a recent dispute between two rival theories in distributive ethics: Restricted Prioritarianism and the Competing Claims View . Both views mandate that the distribution of benefits and burdens between individuals should be justifiable to each affected party in a way that depends on the strength of each individual's separately assessed claim to receive a benefit. However, they disagree about what elements constitute the strength of those individuals’ claims. According to restricted prioritarianism, the strength of a claim is (...)
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  49. added 2016-08-28
    Benjamin Lange (forthcoming). Restricted Prioritarianism or Competing Claims? Utilitas.
    I here settle a recent dispute between two rival theories in distributive ethics: Restricted Prioritarianism and the Competing Claims View . Both views mandate that the distribution of benefits and burdens between individuals should be justifiable to each affected party in a way that depends on the strength of each individual's separately assessed claim to receive a benefit. However, they disagree about what elements constitute the strength of those individuals’ claims. According to restricted prioritarianism, the strength of a claim is (...)
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  50. added 2016-08-25
    S. Andrew Schroeder (forthcoming). Consequentializing and its Consequences. Philosophical Studies:1-23.
    Recently, a number of philosophers have argued that we can and should “consequentialize” non-consequentialist moral theories, putting them into a consequentialist framework. I argue that these philosophers, usually treated as a group, in fact offer three separate arguments, two of which are incompatible. I show that none represent significant threats to a committed non-consequentialist, and that the literature has suffered due to a failure to distinguish these arguments. I conclude by showing that the failure of the consequentializers’ arguments has implications (...)
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