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Normative Ethics

Edited by Jussi Suikkanen (University of Birmingham)
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  1. added 2015-05-29
    Neil Sinhababu (forthcoming). Virtue, Desire, and Silencing Reasons. In Iskra Fileva (ed.), Perspectives on Character. Oxford University Press.
    John McDowell claims that virtuous people recognize moral reasons using a perceptual capacity that doesn't include desire. I show that the phenomena he cites are better explained if desire makes us see considerations favoring its satisfaction as reasons. The salience of moral considerations to the virtuous, like the salience of food to the hungry, exemplifies the emotional and attentional effects of desire. I offer a desire-based account of how we can follow uncodifiable rules of common-sense morality and how some reasons (...)
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  2. added 2015-05-27
    Knut Olav Skarsaune (forthcoming). David Enoch, Taking Morality Seriously: A Defense of Robust Realism , Pp. Xi + 295. Utilitas:1-4.
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  3. added 2015-05-27
    Wendy Donner (forthcoming). Huei-Chun Su, Economic Justice and Liberty: The Social Philosophy in John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism , Pp. Xx + 214. Utilitas:1-5.
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  4. added 2015-05-27
    Lina Papadaki (forthcoming). Treating Others Merely as Means: A Reply to Kerstein. Utilitas:1-28.
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  5. added 2015-05-27
    Ori Freiman (2014). Towards the Epistemology of the Internet of Things: Techno-Epistemology and Ethical Considerations Through the Prism of Trust. International Review of Information Ethics 22:6-22.
    This paper discusses the epistemology of the Internet of Things [IoT] by focusing on the topic of trust. It presents various frameworks of trust, and argues that the ethical framework of trust is what constitutes our responsibility to reveal desired norms and standards and embed them in other frameworks of trust. The first section briefly presents the IoT and scrutinizes the scarce philosophical work that has been done on this subject so far. The second section suggests that the field of (...)
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  6. added 2015-05-26
    Johanna Thoma (forthcoming). Bargaining and the Impartiality of the Social Contract. Philosophical Studies.
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  7. added 2015-05-25
    Andrew Blom (2016). Grotius and Aristotle: The Justice of Taking Too Little. History of Political Thought 36 (1):84-112.
    The theory of justice that Hugo Grotius developed in De Jure Belli ac Pacis (The Law of War and Peace, 1625) set itself against a certain reading of Aristotle, according to which justice is conceived of as a mean between taking too much and taking too little. I argue that we can best understand the implications of Grotius' mature conception by considering the ends to which he had deployed this Aristotelian notion in his earlier work. Grotius came to perceive that (...)
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  8. added 2015-05-24
    Kevin Lynch (forthcoming). Willful Ignorance and Self-Deception. Philosophical Studies:1-19.
    Willful ignorance is an important concept in criminal law and jurisprudence, though it has not received much discussion in philosophy. When it is mentioned, however, it is regularly assumed to be a kind of self-deception. In this article I will argue that self-deception and willful ignorance are distinct psychological kinds. First, some examples of willful ignorance are presented and discussed, and an analysis of the phenomenon is developed. Then it is shown that current theories of self-deception give no support to (...)
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  9. added 2015-05-24
    Thaddeus Metz (2015). Auf Dem Weg Zu Einer Afrikanischen Moraltheorie. In Franziska Dübgen & Stefan Skupien (eds.), Afrikanische politische Philosophie - Postkoloniale Positionen. Suhrkamp.
    Revised version of 'Toward an African Moral Theory' (Journal of Political Philosophy 2007) appearing in German.
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  10. added 2015-05-23
    Trevor Stammers (2015). Editorial for New Bioethics Volume 21.1. New Bioethics: A Multidisciplinary Journal of Biotechnology and the Body 21 (1).
    Editorial for latest issue introducing papers from a symposium held as part of the Irish President's Initiative on Bioethics and others questioning whether autonomy is losing its influence as a predominant principle in bioethics.
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  11. added 2015-05-21
    Terence Rajivan Edward (forthcoming). Unintentional Consent. Kritike: An Online Journal of Philosophy.
    Some political philosophers have judged that it is absurd to think that there can be unintentional consent. In this paper, I present an example of unintentional consent, which I refer to as the adapted boardroom example. I consider reasons for denying that this is an example of unintentional consent, but find that these reasons are unconvincing.
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  12. added 2015-05-20
    Thomas Pölzler (forthcoming). Moral Judgements and Emotions: A Less Intimate Relationship Than Recently Claimed. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 35.
    It has long been claimed that moral judgements are dominated by reason. In recent years, however, the tide has turned. Many psychologists and philosophers now hold the view that there is a close empirical association between moral judgements and emotions. In particular, they claim that emotions (1) co-occur with moral judgements, (2) causally influence moral judgements, (3) are causally sufficient for moral judgements, and (4) are causally necessary for moral judgements. At first sight these hypotheses seem well-supported. In this paper (...)
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  13. added 2015-05-20
    Noell Birondo (forthcoming). Aristotelian Eudaimonism and Patriotism. Dialogue and Universalism 25 (2).
    This paper concerns the prospects for an ‘internal’ validation of the Aristotelian virtues of character. With respect to the more contentious trait of patriotism, this approach for validating some specific trait of character as a virtue of character provides a plausible and nuanced Aristotelian position that does not fall neatly into any of the categories provided by a recent mapping of the terrain surrounding the issue of patriotism. According to the approach advocated here, patriotism can plausibly, though qualifiedly, be defended (...)
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  14. added 2015-05-19
    Neal A. Tognazzini (2009). Review of Alfred Mele's Free Will and Luck. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 118 (2):259-261.
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  15. added 2015-05-19
    Brandon D. C. Fenton, Character and Concept : How Conceptual Blending Constrains Situationism.
    This thesis is an attempt to defend the notion of character from concerns raised recently by situationists . Situationism attempts to undermine the concept of character used to support most versions of virtue ethics by appealing to research in the social sciences. More specifically, both John Doris and Gilbert Harman are global character trait eliminativists who take the social-psychological research to warrant the abandonment of the concept of character. This thesis draws heavily upon the mental space mapping theory known as (...)
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  16. added 2015-05-17
    Bryan Lueck (forthcoming). Communication and Communicability: The Problem of Dignity in Agamben's Remnants of Auschwitz. Semiotics.
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  17. added 2015-05-16
    Matteo Gargani (2015). Forme di responsabilità. L'etica in Lukács come traccia per una rilettura. Isonomia. Online Philosophical Journal of the University of Urbino Andquot;Carlo Bo&Quot;:1-38.
    The current image of Georg Lukács (1885-1971) is widely swayed by an interpretative standard grounded on a deep partition between his young (1910-1918),intermediate (1918-1930) and mature (1930-1971) intellectual production. Despite rejecting an undeniable discontinuity in Lukács’ philosophical evolution,especially between his pre-Marxist works (The Soul and the Forms and Theory of Romance) and the post-1918 Marxist production, I aim for a global reconsideration of Lukács’ philosophy, evaluating a greater unity in his thought. A reflection on ethical problems, specifically on the matter (...)
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  18. added 2015-05-13
    Caleb Dewey, Naturalism Favours Utilitarianism.
    Ever since the founding of utilitarianism, philosophers have noted that naturalists (among others) have a particular affinity towards utilitarianism. In 1999, Jon Mendle explored whether naturalism actually implied utilitarianism and found that it did not. However, implication is not the only way for naturalism to favour utilitarianism. In this essay, I define utilitarianism in terms of practical reason, which I call ``the utilitarian backstory''. This backstory demonstrates that naturalism creates conditions in which rationality subsumes utilitarianism, making non-utilitarian ethics irrational. In (...)
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  19. added 2015-05-13
    Knut Olav Skarsaune (forthcoming). Book Review: David Enoch, Taking Morality Seriously. [REVIEW] Utilitas.
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  20. added 2015-05-11
    Besong Brian (forthcoming). Reappraising the Manual Tradition. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
    Following the Second Vatican Council, the predominant trend in Catholic moral theology has been decidedly antagonistic toward the tradition that dominated moral theology before the Council, namely the use and formulation of ecclesiastically-approved “manuals” or “handbooks” of moral theology, the contents of which chiefly involved general precepts of morally good and bad behavior as well as the extension of those precepts to particular cases. In this paper, I will oppose the dominant anti-manual trend. More particularly, I will first sketch what (...)
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  21. added 2015-05-11
    Rheanna J. Remmel & Andrea L. Glenn (2015). Immorality in the Adult Brain. In Jean Decety & Thalia Wheatly (eds.), The Moral Brain. The MIT Press. 239-251.
    In this chapter we explore the different ways that morality has been studied and measured as well as the ways that it has been found to be deficient in psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder.
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  22. added 2015-05-11
    Adam Kolber (2014). Smooth and Bumpy Laws. California Law Review 102:655-690.
    Modest differences in conduct can lead to wildly different legal outcomes. A person deemed slightly negligent when harming another may owe millions of dollars. Had the person been just a bit more cautious, he would owe nothing. Similarly, when self-defense is deemed slightly negligent, a person may spend several years in prison. Had the person been just a bit more cautious, he would have no criminal liability at all. Though the law must draw difficult lines, the lines need not have (...)
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  23. added 2015-05-07
    Uri D. Leibowitz & Neil Sinclair (eds.) (forthcoming). Explanation in Ethics and Mathematics. Oxford University Press.
    Contents: 1.'Introduction: Explanation in Ethics and Mathematics' Neil Sinclair & Uri D. Leibowitz. Part I: Evolutionary Debunking Arguments 2.'Genealogy and Reliability' Justin Clarke-Doane. 3.'Explaining the Reliability of Moral Beliefs' Folke Tersman. 4.'Genealogical Explanations of Chance and Morals' Toby Handfield. 5.'Evolutionary Debunking Arguments in Religion and Morality' Erik J. Wielenberg. 6.‘An Assumption of Extreme Significance’: Moore, Ross and Spencer on Ethics and Evolution' Hallvard Lillehammer. 7.'Reply: Confessions of a Modest Debunker' Richard Joyce. Part II: Indispensability Arguments. 8.'Moral Explanation for Moral Anti-Realism' (...)
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  24. added 2015-05-07
    Shane Ryan (forthcoming). Paternalism: An Analysis. Utilitas.
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  25. added 2015-05-07
    Christian Miller (forthcoming). Does the CAPS Model Improve Our Understanding of Personality and Character? In Jonathan Webber & Alberto Masala (eds.), From Personality to Virtue. Oxford University Press.
    The goal of this chapter is to offer the first detailed critical assessments of the CAPS model from a philosophical perspective. I will argue for the following claim: using technical language, the CAPS model re-describes and finds supporting evidence for basic platitudes of commonsense folk psychology.
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  26. added 2015-05-07
    Christian Miller (2015). Review of Kristján Kristjánsson's Virtues and Vices in Positive Psychology: A Philosophical Critique. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:online.
    Kristján Kristjánsson's new book is the first detailed treatment of positive psychology from a philosophical perspective (at least as far as I am aware). Kristjánsson has been an active contributor to a number of debates in recent years at the intersection of moral philosophy, psychology, and education, and brings his vast familiarity with the relevant literature to bear in engaging with this movement. The result is a book that raises a number of good questions and concerns about positive psychology, but (...)
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  27. added 2015-05-06
    William Hasselberger (2015). Paul Bloomfield, The Virtues of Happiness: A Theory of the Good Life , Pp. Vii + 232. Utilitas 27 (2):257-262.
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  28. added 2015-05-06
    Torbjörn Tännsjö (2015). Utilitarianism or Prioritarianism? Utilitas 27 (2):240-250.
    A simple hedonistic theory allowing for interpersonal comparisons of happiness is taken for granted in this article. The hedonistic theory is used to compare utilitarianism, urging us to maximize the sum total of happiness, with prioritarianism, urging us to maximize a sum total of weighed happiness. It is argued with reference to a few thought experiments that utilitarianism is, intuitively speaking, more plausible than prioritarianism. The problem with prioritarianism surfaces when prudence and morality come apart.
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  29. added 2015-05-06
    Errol Lord (2015). Joshua Gert, Normative Bedrock: Response-Dependence, Rationality, and Reasons , Pp. X + 218. Utilitas 27 (2):251-254.
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  30. added 2015-05-06
    Ben Eggleston (2015). Thomas Piketty, Capital in the Twenty-First Century , Trans. Arthur Goldhammer , Pp. Viii + 685. Utilitas 27 (2):254-256.
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  31. added 2015-05-06
    James G. Quigley (2015). Moral Psychology and the Unity of Morality. Utilitas 27 (2):119-146.
    Jonathan Haidt's research on moral cognition has revealed that political liberals moralize mostly in terms of Harm and Fairness, whereas conservatives moralize in terms of those plus loyalty to Ingroup, respect for Authority, and Purity . Some have concluded that the norms of morality encompass a wide variety of subject matters with no deep unity. To the contrary, I argue that the conservative position is partially debunked by its own lights. IAP norms’ moral relevance depends on their tendency to promote (...)
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  32. added 2015-05-04
    Makoto Usami (2015). Justice After Catastrophe: Responsibility and Security. Ritsumeikan Studies in Language and Culture 26 (4):215-230.
    The issue of justice after catastrophe is an enormous challenge to contemporary theories of distributive justice. In the past three decades, the controversy over distributive justice has centered on the ideal of equality. One of intensely debated issues concerns what is often called the “equality of what,” on which there are three primary views: welfarism, resourcism, and the capabilities approach. Another major point of dispute can be termed the “equality or another,” about which three positions debate: egalitarianism, prioritarianism, and sufficientarianism. (...)
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  33. added 2015-05-04
    Martha J. Farah (2010). Neuroethics: An Introduction with Readings. MIT Press.
    Neuroscience increasingly allows us to explain, predict, and even control aspects of human behavior. The ethical issues that arise from these developments extend beyond the boundaries of conventional bioethics into philosophy of mind, psychology, theology, public policy, and the law. This broader set of concerns is the subject matter of neuroethics. In this book, leading neuroscientist Martha Farah introduces the reader to the key issues of neuroethics, placing them in scientific and cultural context and presenting a carefully chosen set of (...)
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  34. added 2015-05-04
    Neil Levy (2007). Neuroethics: Challenges for the 21st Century. Cambridge University Press.
    Neuroscience has dramatically increased understanding of how mental states and processes are realized by the brain, thus opening doors for treating the multitude of ways in which minds become dysfunctional. This book explores questions such as when is it permissible to alter a person's memories, influence personality traits or read minds? What can neuroscience tell us about free will, self-control, self-deception and the foundations of morality? The view of neuroethics offered here argues that many of our new powers to read (...)
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  35. added 2015-05-01
    Tony Manela (forthcoming). Obligations of Gratitude and Correlative Rights. Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics 5.
    This article investigates a puzzle about gratitude—the proper response, in a beneficiary, to an act of benevolence from a benefactor. The puzzle arises from three platitudes about gratitude: 1) the beneficiary has certain obligations of gratitude; 2) these obligations are owed to the benefactor; and 3) the benefactor has no right to the fulfillment of these obligations. These platitudes suggest that gratitude is a counterexample to the “correlativity thesis” in the moral domain: the claim that strict moral obligations correlate to (...)
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  36. added 2015-04-27
    Chris Heathwood (2014). Faring Well and Getting What You Want. In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), The Ethical Life: Fundamental Readings in Ethics and Moral Problems. Oxford University Press. 31-42.
    An introductory-level article defending a desire-satisfaction theory of welfare. About 5,000 words; no footnotes, citations, credits, etc.
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  37. added 2015-04-26
    Tove Pettersen (2015). Existential Humanism and Moral Freedom in Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics. In Tove Pettersen Annlaug Bjørsnøs (ed.), Simone de Beauvoir – A Humanist Thinker. Brill/Rodopi. 69-91.
    In "Existential Humanism and Moral Freedom in Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics" Tove Pettersen elucidates the close connection between Beauvoir’s ethics and humanism, and argues that her humanism is an existential humanism. Beauvoir’s concept of freedom is inspected, followed by a discussion of her reasons for making moral freedom the leading normative value, and her claim that we must act for humanity. In Beauvoir’s ethics, freedom is not reserved for the elite, but understood as everyone being “able to surpass the given (...)
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  38. added 2015-04-26
    Brad Hooker (2014). "Utilitarianism and Fairness". In Cambridge Companion to Utilitarianism. 251-271.
  39. added 2015-04-26
    Brad Hooker (2014). Must Kantian Contractualism and Rule-Consequentialism Converge? Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics 4:34-52.
    Derek Parfit’s On What Matters endorses Kantian Contractualism, the normative theory that everyone ought to follow the rules that everyone could rationally will that everyone accept. This paper explores Parfit’s argument that Kantian Contractualism converges with Rule Consequentialism. A pivotal concept in Parfit’s argument is the concept of impartiality, which he seems to equate agent-neutrality. This paper argues that equating impartiality and agent-neutrality is insufficient, since some agent-neutral considerations are silly and some are not impartial. Perhaps more importantly, there is (...)
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  40. added 2015-04-24
    Kengo Miyazono & Shen-yi Liao (forthcoming). The Cognitive Architecture of Imaginative Resistance. In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination.
    Where is imagination in imaginative resistance? -/- We seek to answer this question by connecting two ongoing lines of inquiry in different subfields of philosophy. In philosophy of mind, philosophers have been trying to understand imaginative attitudes’ place in cognitive architecture. In aesthetics, philosophers have been trying to understand the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. By connecting these two lines of inquiry, we hope to find mutual illumination of an attitude (or cluster of attitudes) and a phenomenon that have vexed philosophers. (...)
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  41. added 2015-04-24
    Vuko Andric & Attila Tanyi (forthcoming). Multi-Dimensional Consequentialism and Degrees of Rightness. Philosophical Studies.
    In his recent book, The Dimensions of Consequentialism, Martin Peterson puts forward a new version of consequentialism that he dubs ‘multi-dimensional consequentialism’. The defining thesis of the new theory is that there are irreducible moral aspects that jointly determine the deontic status of an act. In defending his particular version of multi-dimensional consequentialism, Peterson advocates the thesis – he calls it DEGREE – that if two or more moral aspects clash, the act under consideration is right to some non-extreme degree. (...)
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  42. added 2015-04-24
    Kecia Ali (2015). Muslims and Meat‐Eating. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (2):268-288.
    Religious thinking, including among Muslims, connects food and sex, as well as women and animals; both food practices and gender norms are significant for communal identity and boundary construction. Female bodies and animal bodies serve as potent signifiers of Muslim identity, as patriarchal thought sustains the hierarchical cosmologies that affirm male dominance in family and society and allow humans to view animals as legitimately subject to human violence. I argue that Muslims in the industrialized West—especially those concerned with gender justice—ought (...)
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  43. added 2015-04-24
    Rosemary B. Kellison (2015). Impure Agency and the Just War. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (2):317-341.
    Feminist critiques of intention challenge some aspects of traditional just war reasoning, including the criteria of right intention and discrimination . I take note of these challenges and propose some directions just war reasoners might take in response. First, right intention can be evaluated more accurately by judging what actors in war actually do than by attempting to uncover inward dispositions. Assessing whether agents in war have taken due care to minimize foreseeable collateral damage, avoided intentional targeting of noncombatants, corrected (...)
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  44. added 2015-04-24
    Hille Haker (2015). Catholic Feminist Ethics Reconsidered. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (2):218-243.
    Taking Catholic sexual ethics and liberal feminist ethics as points of departure, this essay argues that both frameworks are ill-prepared to deal with the moral problems raised by sex trafficking: while Catholic sexual ethics is grounded in a normative understanding of sexuality, liberal feminist ethics argues for women's sexual autonomy, resting upon freedom of action and consent. From a perspective that attends both to the phenomenological interpretation of embodied selves and the Kantian normative interpretation of dignity, it becomes possible to (...)
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  45. added 2015-04-24
    Atalia Omer (2015). The Cry of the Forgotten Stones. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (2):369-407.
    Based on extensive archival work, this essay assesses the contribution of a Palestinian liberation theology to a comprehensive view of peacebuilding that involves not only liberation from oppressive occupation but also a holistic vision and strategy for attaining just societal structures. Emerging out of the victim's viewpoint, a PLT is consistent with a multiperspectival approach to justice. It articulates a call for a holistic transformation of the interrelations between Jews and Palestinians, envisioning a just peace that must entail a re-framing (...)
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  46. added 2015-04-24
    Lisa Sowle Cahill (2015). Renegotiating Aquinas. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (2):193-217.
    While Roman Catholic feminist ethicists typically endorse moral realism and crosscultural standards of justice, they also have been influenced by the postmodern interrogation of abstract reason and moral universalism. As theologians writing after the Second Vatican Council, they are increasingly sensitive to the communal and ecclesial dimensions of morality and of Christian ethics, and to the integral relation of Christian faith and ethics. This essay will consider two approaches to Catholic feminist ethics that differ in the relative weight they give (...)
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  47. added 2015-04-24
    Rebecca J. E. Levi (2015). A Polyvocal Body. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (2):244-267.
    This essay aims to elucidate how multiple voices and traditions should interact with one another in the practice of ethics. First, it explores some of the major ways in which questions of bodily autonomy function in secular feminist and Jewish bioethical discourses. It then uses case studies to illuminate ways each discourse's concepts of bodily autonomy can be deeply problematic, and argues that the strengths in each discourse can serve as important correctives for the weaknesses in the other. It suggests (...)
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  48. added 2015-04-24
    Thelathia N. Young & Shannon J. Miller (2015). Asé and Amen, Sister! Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (2):289-316.
    At times, the academy seems devoid of justice because it emphasizes the cultivation of knowledge often denied to marginalized individuals and communities. As black queer feminist scholars doing praxis-driven theorizing from separate fields on the subject of black queer families and communities, we employ research methods that resist the dynamics of power and privilege that exist within normative researcher-participant exchanges. In this essay, we explore and highlight the ethical, justice-oriented, and dialogical relationship between researcher-scholars and research participants. Through story and (...)
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  49. added 2015-04-24
    Emily Dumler‐Winckler (2015). Putting on Virtue Without Putting Off Feminists. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (2):342-367.
    Mary Wollstonecraft's account of virtue discourse and formation, which deploys ancient and medieval ethical resources for modern purposes, challenges a prevalent narrative in Christian ethics today. Several prominent Christian virtue ethicists have left the false impression that serious reflection on the virtues depends on pre-modern traditions and the eschewal of modern resources. Troubled by skeptical quandaries and the difficulty of adjudicating conflicting claims about virtue, they are concerned with securing a pre-modern court of appeals. Many feminists worry that these appeals (...)
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  50. added 2015-04-24
    Margaret Mohrmann (2015). Feminist Ethics and Religious Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (2):185-192.
    This focus issue is a conversation at and about the interface of feminist ethics and religious ethics, in order to show what these multifaceted fields of intellectual endeavor and practical import have to say to each other, to teach and to learn. The seven essays approach that dialogue from a variety of angles and traditions, reflecting the fecundity of both fields and the wide-ranging concerns of colleagues in religious ethics who share commitments and methods with feminist ethics.
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