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Normative Ethics

Edited by Jussi Suikkanen (University of Birmingham)
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  1. added 2015-08-01
    Olle Risberg (forthcoming). Weighting Surprise Parties: Some Problems for Schroeder. Utilitas:1-7.
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  2. added 2015-08-01
    David A. Nordquest (forthcoming). Mill and the Gorgias. Utilitas:1-9.
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  3. added 2015-07-31
    Justin Tosi & Brandon Warmke (forthcoming). Punishment and Forgiveness. In Jonathan Jacobs & Jonathan Jackson (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Criminal Justice Ethics. Routledge
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  4. added 2015-07-31
    Sarin Marchetti (2015). Ethics and Philosophical Critique in William James. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  5. added 2015-07-31
    Hannes Rakoczy, Tanya Behne, Annette Clüver, Stephanie Dallmann, Sarah Weidner & Michael Waldmann (2015). The Side-Effect Effect in Children Is Robust and Not Specific to the Moral Status of Action Effects. PLoS ONE 10:1-10.
    Adults’ intentionality judgments regarding an action are influenced by their moral evaluation of this action. This is clearly indicated in the so-called side-effect effect: when told about an action (e.g. implementing a business plan) with an intended primary effect (e.g. raise profits) and a foreseen side effect (e.g. harming/helping the environment), subjects tend to interpret the bringing about of the side effect more often as intentional when it is negative (harming the environment) than when it is positive (helping the environment). (...)
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  6. added 2015-07-31
    Elise Cardinale, Elizabeth Finger, Julia Schechter, Ilana Jurkowitz, R. J. R. Blair & Abigail Marsh (2014). The Moral Status of an Action Influences its Perceived Intentional Status in Adolescents with Psychopathic Traits. In Tania Lombrozo, Joshua Knobe & Shaun Nichols (eds.), Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy: Volume 1. Oxford University Press 131-151.
    Moral judgments about an action are influenced by the action’s intentionality. The reverse is also true: judgments of intentionality can be influenced by an action’s moral valence. For example, respondents judge a harmful side-effect of an intended outcome to be more intentional than a helpful side-effect. Debate continues regarding the mechanisms underlying this “side-effect effect” and the conditions under which it will persist. The research behind this chapter tested whether the side-effect effect is intact in adolescents with psychopathic traits, who (...)
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  7. added 2015-07-30
    Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (2015). Are Enabling and Allowing Harm Morally Equivalent? Utilitas 27 (3):365-383.
    It is sometimes asserted that enabling harm is morally equivalent to allowing harm. In this article, I criticize this view. Positively, I show that cases involving self-defence and cases involving people acting on the basis of a reasonable belief to the effect that certain obstacles to harm will remain in place, or will be put in place, show that enabling harm is harder to justify than allowing it. Negatively, I argue that certain cases offered in defence of the moral equivalence (...)
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  8. added 2015-07-30
    Søren Flinch Midtgaard (2015). Non-Renounceable Rights, Paternalism and Autonomy. Utilitas 27 (3):347-364.
    The notion of a non-renounceable right is an integral part of recent liberal reconciliatory attempts to justify apparently paternalistic policies, such as compulsory insurance or providing people with certain goods irrespective of their subjective preferences, non-paternalistically. However, non-renounceable rights cannot be justified non-paternalistically. A critical scrutiny of the liberal reconciliatory arguments in question reveals this and points towards a plausible paternalist justification of the policies in question.
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  9. added 2015-07-27
    Attila Tanyi & Vuko Andric (forthcoming). God and Eternal Boredom. Religious Studies.
    God is thought to be eternal. Does this mean that he is timeless? Or is he, rather, omnitemporal? In this paper we want to show that God cannot be omnitemporal. Our starting point, which we take from Bernard Williams’ article on the Makropulos Case, is the intuition that it is inappropriate for persons not to become bored after a sufficiently long sequence of time has passed. If God were omnitemporal, he would suffer from boredom. But God is the greatest possible (...)
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  10. added 2015-07-27
    Andreas Eriksen (forthcoming). Beyond Professional Duty in Advance. International Journal of Applied Philosophy.
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  11. added 2015-07-25
    Alfred Archer (forthcoming). The Supererogatory and How Not To Accommodate It: A Reply to Dorsey. Utilitas:1-10.
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  12. added 2015-07-25
    Ittay Nissan-Rozen (forthcoming). Book Review on "the Limits of Kindness". [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy.
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  13. added 2015-07-25
    Erin Beeghly (2015). What is a Stereotype? What is Stereotyping? Hypatia 30 (3).
    If someone says, “Asians are good at math” or “women are empathetic,” I might interject, “you're stereotyping” in order to convey my disapproval of their utterance. But why is stereotyping wrong? Before we can answer this question, we must better understand what stereotypes are and what stereotyping is. In this essay, I develop what I call the descriptive view of stereotypes and stereotyping. This view is assumed in much of the psychological and philosophical literature on implicit bias and stereotyping, yet (...)
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  14. added 2015-07-24
    Alfred Archer (forthcoming). Review: Lisa Tessman. Moral Failure: On The Impossible Demands of Morality. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly.
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  15. added 2015-07-23
    Gerard Vong (forthcoming). Fairness, Benefiting by Lottery and the Chancy Satisfaction of Moral Claims. Utilitas:1-17.
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  16. added 2015-07-23
    Philip A. Reed (forthcoming). Empirical Adequacy and Virtue Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    Situationists contend that virtue ethics is empirically inadequate. However, it is my contention that there is much confusion over what “empirical adequacy” or “empirical inadequacy” actually means in this context. My aim in this paper is to clarify the meanings of empirical adequacy in order to see to what extent virtue ethics might fail to meet this standard. I argue that the situationists frequently misconstrue the empirical commitments of virtue ethics. More importantly, depending on what we mean by empirical adequacy, (...)
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  17. added 2015-07-22
    John Kelsay (2015). Introduction to Little/Sachedina Conversation. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):521-524.
    This essay provides a brief introduction to the articles by David Little and Abdulaziz Sachedina.
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  18. added 2015-07-22
    Laura M. Hartman (2015). Environmental Modesty. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):475-492.
    Despite this virtue's history as an instrument of women's oppression, modesty, at its most basic, means voluntary restraint of one's power, undertaken for the sake of others. It is a mechanism that modifies unequal power relationships and encourages greater compassion and fairness. I use a Christian perspective with influences from Jewish and Muslim sources to examine modesty. The modest person, I argue, must be in relationship with others, must be honestly aware of her impacts on others, must be sensitive to (...)
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  19. added 2015-07-22
    Abdulaziz Sachedina (2015). Continuing the Conversation About Comparative Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):543-556.
    This essay clarifies my stance on the distinctive facets of Christianity as a sole paradigm for a liberal interpretation of Islam in the area of human rights. It attempts to demonstrate the limits of applying a comparative ethics methodology without a firm grounding in historical studies that reveal the contextual aspects of the debate whether any religion, including Islam, is incapable of providing cultural legitimacy to the secular Universal Declaration of Human Rights among Muslim traditionalists. In the absence of the (...)
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  20. added 2015-07-22
    Aryeh Cohen (2015). Justice, Wealth, Taxes. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):409-431.
    A story of rabbinic poverty relief serves as the fulcrum of this presentation of a rabbinic perspective on wealth and taxes. The rabbinic move, from biblical to Mishnaic law, places the obligation of poverty relief on the city and suggests that the institutions of the polis are the only way to achieve justice on this scale. However, the city must be aware of the individual Other in making policy. In essence the story suggests that when policies ignore the face of (...)
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  21. added 2015-07-22
    David Little (2015). Rethinking the Comparative Study of Religious Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):525-542.
    This essay describes the author's change of approach to the comparative study of religious ethics from the one contained in a book on the subject, published in 1978. The change resulted from interactions with Abdulaziz Sachedina, the noted scholar of Islam, demonstrating the importance of comparing different ethical systems in reference to global topics like human rights, particularly the right to freedom of conscience.
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  22. added 2015-07-22
    Gerald K. Harrison (2015). Morality, Inescapable Rational Authority, and a God's Wishes. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):454-474.
    It is a supposed conceptual truth about moral norms that we have reason to comply with them even if we desire not to. This combination of rational authority and inescapability is thought to be incompatible with instrumentalism about practical reason. This essay argues that there are ways in which norms with inescapable rational authority can exist alongside instrumentalism about practical reason. One way involves positing an afterlife and a powerful supernatural agency—so, a kind of god—who has total control over our (...)
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  23. added 2015-07-22
    Ryan West (2015). Contempt and the Cultivation of Character. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):493-519.
    Macalester Bell urges the cultivation of apt contempt as the best response to what she calls “the vices of superiority”. In this essay, I sketch two character profiles. The first—the ideal contemnor—paradigmatically answers the vices of superiority with contempt. The second—the ideal Christian neighbor—is marked by humility and love, and answers the vices of superiority in non-contemptuous ways. I argue that the latter character rivals the former as a fitting moral response to the vices of superiority. Furthermore, I argue that (...)
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  24. added 2015-07-22
    Danielle C. Dubois (2015). The Virtuous Fall. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):432-453.
    The medieval Church's concern with moral reform contributed to the emergence of a genre of literature in the thirteenth century dedicated to the vices and virtues. Inspired by monastic and scholastic traditions, treatises such as Laurent d'Orléans's Somme le roi encouraged the avoidance of sin and provided the faithful with a moral taxonomy that ultimately ensured their access to heaven. Marguerite Porete's Mirror of Simple Souls and Meister Eckhart's Discourses of Instruction challenge this virtue-centered approach to salvation. Relying on their (...)
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  25. added 2015-07-22
    Kusumita P. Pedersen (2015). Religious Ethics and the Environment. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):558-585.
    This essay discusses three recent books which each offer an integrative account of religious ethics and the environment. Religious environmental ethics is an area of inquiry within the larger field of religion and ecology. After a narrative that contextualizes the development of religious environmental ethics in relation to the environmental social movement, I describe the formation of the field including its focus on worldview, the “cosmological turn,” and its engagement with science, the “cosmic turn.” Elizabeth Johnson exemplifies the cosmic turn (...)
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  26. added 2015-07-21
    Cheng-Hung Tsai (forthcoming). Ethical Expertise and the Articulacy Requirement. Synthese:1-18.
    Recently virtue ethicists, such as Julia Annas and Matt Stichter, in order to explain what a moral virtue is and how it is acquired, suggest modeling virtue on practical expertise. However, a challenging issue arises when considering the nature of practical expertise especially about whether expertise requires articulacy, that is, whether an expert in a skill is required to possess an ability to articulate the principles underlying the skill. With regard to this issue, Annas advocates the articulacy requirement, while Stichter (...)
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  27. added 2015-07-21
    Molly Gardner (2015). Review of The Non-Identity Problem and the Ethics of Future People. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
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  28. added 2015-07-17
    Emad H. Atiq (forthcoming). How to Be Impartial as a Subjectivist. Philosophical Studies:1-23.
    The metaethical subjectivist claims that there is nothing more to a moral disagreement than a conflict in the desires of the parties involved. Recently, David Enoch has argued that metaethical subjectivism has unacceptable ethical implications. If the subjectivist is right about moral disagreement, then it follows, according to Enoch, that we cannot stand our ground in moral disagreements without violating the demands of impartiality. For being impartial, we’re told, involves being willing to compromise in conflicts that are merely due to (...)
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  29. added 2015-07-17
    Roland Mees (2015). Sustainable Action and Moral Corruption. In Dieter Birnbacher & May Thorseth (eds.), The Politics of Sustainability: Philosophical perspectives. Routledge 109-126.
    The concept of moral corruption has been pointed at as the root cause of our failure to make progress with acting towards a sustainable future. This chapter defines moral corruption as the agent’s strategy not to form the intentions needed to overcome the motivational obstacles of sustainable action. Moral corruption is considered similar to Kant’s radical evil; it causes our practical identities to be divided. The question then arises: how could we possibly strive for moral integrity, while simultaneously being infected (...)
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  30. added 2015-07-16
    Sven Nyholm (forthcoming). Revisiting Kant's Universal Law and Humanity Formulas. De Gruyter.
    This book offers new readings of Kant’s “universal law” and “humanity” formulations of the categorical imperative. It shows how, on these readings, the formulas do indeed turn out being alternative statements of the same basic moral law, and in the process responds to many of the standard objections raised against Kant’s theory. Its first chapter briefly explores the ways in which Kant draws on his philosophical predecessors such as Plato (and especially Plato’s Republic) and Jean-Jacque Rousseau. The second chapter offers (...)
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  31. added 2015-07-15
    Pauline Kleingeld (forthcoming). Consistent Egoists and Situation Managers: Two Problems for Situationism. Philosophical Explorations:1-18.
    According to philosophical “situationism”, psychological evidence shows that human action is typically best explained by the influence of situational factors and not by “global” and robust character traits of the agent. As a practical implication of their view, situationists recommend that efforts in moral education be shifted from character development to situation management. Much of the discussion has focused on whether global conceptions of virtue and character, and in particular Aristotelian virtue ethics, can be defended against the situationist challenge. After (...)
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  32. added 2015-07-15
    James Arthur, Kristján Kristjánsson, David Walker, Wouter Sanderse & Chantel Jones, Character Education in UK Schools: Research Report.
    The research project described in this report represents one of the most extensive studies of character education ever undertaken, including over 10,000 students and 255 teachers in schools across England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales. Research techniques consisted of a mixture of surveys, moral dilemmas and semi-structured interviews. This report explores: - The current situation in character education, both in the UK and internationally - How developed British students are with respect to moral character and the extent to which they (...)
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  33. added 2015-07-14
    Ezio Di Nucci (forthcoming). Strategic Bombing, Causal Beliefs, and Double Effect. Journal of Value Inquiry.
    I argue against the Doctrine of Double Effect’s explanation of the moral difference between terror bombing and strategic bombing. I show that the standard thought-experiment of terror bombing and strategic bombing which dominates this debate is underdetermined with regards to the agents’ psychologies: (a) if Terror Bomber and Strategic Bomber have the same causal beliefs, then why does Terror Bomber set out to kill the children? It may then be this unwarranted and immoral choice and not the Doctrine of Double (...)
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  34. added 2015-07-13
    Felix Pinkert (2015). What If I Cannot Make a Difference (and Know It). Ethics 125 (4):971-998.
    When several agents together produce suboptimal outcomes, yet no individual could have made a difference for the better, Act Consequentialism counterintuitively judges that all involved agents act rightly. I address this problem by supplementing Act Consequentialism with a requirement of modal robustness: Agents not only ought to produce best consequences in the actual world, but they also ought to be such that they would act optimally in certain counterfactual scenarios. I interpret this Modally Robust Act Consequentialism as Act Consequentialism plus (...)
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  35. added 2015-07-10
    Rafe McGregor (forthcoming). Narrative Representation and Phenomenological Knowledge. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that narrative representations can provide knowledge in virtue of their narrativity, regardless of their truth value. I set out the question in section 1, distinguishing narrative cognitivism from aesthetic cognitivism and narrative representations from non-narrative representations. Sections 2 and 3 argue that exemplary narratives can provide lucid phenomenological knowledge, which appears to meet both the epistemic and narrativity criteria for the narrative cognitivist thesis. In section 4, I turn to non-narrative representation, focusing (...)
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  36. added 2015-07-09
    James Edwin Mahon, The Definition of Lying and Deception. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Survey of different definitions of lying and deceiving, with an emphasis on the contemporary debate between Thomas Carson, Roy Sorensen, Don Fallis, Jennifer Saul, Paul Faulkner, Jennifer Lackey, David Simpson, Andreas Stokke, Jorg Meibauer, Seana Shiffrin, and James Mahon, among others, over whether lies always aim to deceive. Related questions include whether lies must be assertions, whether lies always breach trust, whether it is possible to lie without using spoken or written language, whether lies must always be false, whether lies (...)
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  37. added 2015-07-09
    Justin Tosi (2009). Responsibility and Justice. [REVIEW] Journal of Politics 71 (4):1600-1602.
  38. added 2015-07-08
    Pierre Landou (2015). review of Nathalie Maillard "Faut-il être minimaliste en éthique ?". [REVIEW] L'Oeil de Minerve 2015.
    Recension de "Faut-il être minimaliste en éthique ?" de Nathalie Maillard.
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  39. added 2015-07-07
    E. Sonny Elizondo (forthcoming). Morality is its Own Reward. Kantian Review.
    Traditionally, Kantian ethics has been thought hostile to well-being. Recent commentators have rightly called this view into question, but they do not push their challenge far enough. For they leave in place a fundamental assumption on which the traditional view rests, viz., that happiness is all there is to well-being. This assumption is important, since, combined with Kant’s rationalism about morality and empiricism about happiness, it implies that morality and well-being are at best extrinsically related. Since morality can only make (...)
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  40. added 2015-07-04
    Neil Delaney (forthcoming). The Doctrine of Double Effect in Advance. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
    Abstract: This essay consists of some clarifying remarks on the doctrine of double effect (DDE). After providing a contemporary formulation of the doctrine we put special emphasis on the distinction between those aspects of an action plan that are intended and those that are merely foreseen (the I/F distinction). Making use of this distinction is often made difficult in practice because salient aspects of the action plan exhibit a felt “closeness” to one another that is difficult if not impossible to (...)
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  41. added 2015-07-04
    Erin Frykholm (2015). A Humean Particularist Virtue Ethic. Philosophical Studies 172 (8):2171-2191.
    Virtue ethical theories typically follow a neo-Aristotelian or quasi-Aristotelian model, making use of various combinations of key features of the Aristotelian model including eudaimonism, perfectionism, an account of practical wisdom, and the thesis of the unity of the virtues. In this paper I motivate what I call a Humean virtue ethic, which is a deeply particularist account of virtue that rejects all of these central tenets, at least in their traditional forms. Focusing on three factors by which Hume determines virtue, (...)
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  42. added 2015-07-03
    Michael Bishop (2015). The Good Life: Unifying the Philosophy and Psychology of Well-Being. OUP Usa.
    Science and philosophy study well-being with different but complementary methods. Marry these methods and a new picture emerges: To have well-being is to be "stuck" in a positive cycle of emotions, attitudes, traits and success. This book unites the scientific and philosophical worldviews into a powerful new theory of well-being.
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  43. added 2015-07-03
    Amir Saemi (2015). Aiming at the Good. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):197-219.
    This paper shows how we can plausibly extend the guise of the good thesis in a way that avoids intellectualist challenge, allows animals to be included, and is consistent with the possibility of performing action under the cognition of their badness. The paper also presents some independent arguments for the plausibility of this interpretation of the thesis. To this aim, a teleological conception of practical attitudes as well as a cognitivist account of arational desires is offered.
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  44. added 2015-07-03
    Robert Rovetto (2011). Misidentification and the Self. In Rienti Jr, Jennifer L. Faux, Laura A. LeVon & Caitlin L. Curtis (eds.), Proceedings of the 2011 Anthropology Graduate Student Association Interdisciplinary Graduate Symposium. University at Buffalo - The State University of New York 68-80.
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  45. added 2015-07-02
    Ryan Preston-Roedder & Erica Preston-Roedder, Grief and Recovery.
    Imagine that someone recovers relatively quickly, say, within two or three months, from grief over the death of her spouse, whom she loved and who loved her; and suppose that, after some brief interval, she remarries. Does the fact that she feels better and moves on relatively quickly somehow diminish the quality of her earlier relationship? Does it constitute a failure to do well by the person who died? Our aim is to respond to two arguments that give affirmative answers (...)
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  46. added 2015-07-02
    Michael Moehler (forthcoming). Orthodox Rational Choice Contractarianism: Before and After Gauthier. Politics, Philosophy and Economics.
    In a recent article, Gauthier (2013) rejects orthodox rational choice contractarianism in favor of a revisionist approach to the social contract that, according to him, justifies his principle of maximin proportionate gain (formerly the principle of minimax relative concession or maximin relative benefit) as a principle of distributive justice. I agree with Gauthier that his principle of maximin proportionate gain cannot be justified by orthodox rational choice contractarianism. I argue, however, that orthodox rational choice contractarianism, before and after Gauthier, is (...)
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  47. added 2015-07-01
    Joel Smith (forthcoming). What is Empathy For? Synthese:1-14.
    The concept of empathy has received much attention from philosophers and also from both cognitive and social psychologists. It has, however, been given widely conflicting definitions, with some taking it primarily as an epistemological notion and others as a social one. Recently, empathy has been closely associated with the simulationist approach to social cognition and, as such, it might be thought that the concept’s utility stands or falls with that of simulation itself. I suggest that this is a mistake. Approaching (...)
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  48. added 2015-06-30
    Shane Ryan (forthcoming). Paternalism: An Analysis. Utilitas.
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  49. added 2015-06-30
    Bryan Lueck (forthcoming). Communication and Communicability: The Problem of Dignity in Agamben's Remnants of Auschwitz. Semiotics.
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  50. added 2015-06-30
    Lina Papadaki (forthcoming). Treating Others Merely as Means: A Reply to Kerstein. Utilitas:1-28.
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