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Normative Ethics

Edited by Jussi Suikkanen (University of Birmingham)
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  1. added 2016-02-13
    John J. Tilley (2016). Hutcheson's Theological Objection to Egoism. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):101-123.
    Francis Hutcheson's objections to psychological egoism usually appeal to experience or introspection. However, at least one of them is theological: It includes premises of a religious kind, such as that God rewards the virtuous. This objection invites interpretive and philosophical questions, some of which may seem to highlight errors or shortcomings on Hutcheson's part. Also, to answer the questions is to point out important features of Hutcheson's objection and its intellectual context. And nowhere in the scholarship on Hutcheson do we (...)
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  2. added 2016-02-12
    Alfred Archer (forthcoming). Moral Obligation, Self-Interest and The Transitivity Problem. Utilitas.
    Is the relation ‘is a morally permissible alternative to’ transitive? The answer seems to be a straightforward yes. If Act B is a morally permissible alternative to Act A and Act C is a morally permissible alternative to B then how could C fail to be a morally permissible alternative to A? However, as both Dale Dorsey and Frances Kamm point out, there are cases where this transitivity appears problematic. My aim in this paper is to provide a solution to (...)
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  3. added 2016-02-11
    Vuko Andrić (forthcoming). Is Objective Consequentialism Compatible with the Principle That “Ought” Implies “Can”? Philosophia:1-15.
    Some philosophers hold that objective consequentialism is false because it is incompatible with the principle that “ought” implies “can”. Roughly speaking, objective consequentialism is the doctrine that you always ought to do what will in fact have the best consequences. According to the principle that “ought” implies “can”, you have a moral obligation to do something only if you can do that thing. Frances Howard-Snyder has used an innovative thought experiment to argue that sometimes you cannot do what will in (...)
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  4. added 2016-02-11
    J. Adam Carter & Martin Peterson (forthcoming). The Modal Account of Luck Revisited. Synthese.
    According to the canonical formulation of the modal account of luck (e.g. Pritchard (2005, 128)), an event is lucky just when that event occurs in the actual world but not in a wide class of the nearest possible worlds where the relevant conditions for that event are the same as in the actual world. This paper argues, with reference to a novel variety of counterexample, that it is a mistake to focus, when assessing a given event for luckiness, on events (...)
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  5. added 2016-02-09
    Travis Timmerman & Yishai Cohen (forthcoming). Moral Obligations: Actualist, Possibilist, or Hybridist? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    Do facts about what an agent would freely do in certain circumstances at least partly determine any of her moral obligations? Actualists answer ‘yes’, while possibilists answer ‘no’. We defend two novel hybrid accounts that are alternatives to actualism and possibilism: Dual Obligations Hybridism and Single Obligation Hybridism. By positing two moral ‘oughts’, each account retains the benefits of actualism and possibilism, yet is immune from the prima facie problems that face actualism and possibilism. We conclude by highlighting one substantive (...)
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  6. added 2016-02-09
    Mark Rowlands & Susana Monsó (forthcoming). Animals as Reflexive Thinkers: The Aponoian Paradigm. In Linda Kalof (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Animal Studies. Oxford University Press
    The ability to engage in reflexive thought—in thought about thought or about other mental states more generally—is regarded as a complex intellectual achievement that is beyond the capacities of most nonhuman animals. To the extent that reflexive thought capacities are believed necessary for the possession of many other psychological states or capacities, including consciousness, belief, emotion, and empathy, the inability of animals to engage in reflexive thought calls into question their other psychological abilities. This chapter attacks the idea that reflexive (...)
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  7. added 2016-02-09
    Mark Rowlands & Susana Monsó (forthcoming). Animals as Reflexive Thinkers: The Aponoian Paradigm. In Linda Kalof (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Animal Studies. Oxford University Press
    The ability to engage in reflexive thought—in thought about thought or about other mental states more generally—is regarded as a complex intellectual achievement that is beyond the capacities of most nonhuman animals. To the extent that reflexive thought capacities are believed necessary for the possession of many other psychological states or capacities, including consciousness, belief, emotion, and empathy, the inability of animals to engage in reflexive thought calls into question their other psychological abilities. This chapter attacks the idea that reflexive (...)
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  8. added 2016-02-08
    Vladimir Chituc, Paul Henne, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Felipe De Brigard (2016). Blame, Not Ability, Impacts Moral “Ought” Judgments for Impossible Actions: Toward an Empirical Refutation of “Ought” Implies “Can”. Cognition 150:20-25.
    Recently, psychologists have explored moral concepts including obligation, blame, and ability. While little empirical work has studied the relationships among these concepts, philosophers have widely assumed such a relationship in the principle that “ought” implies “can,” which states that if someone ought to do something, then they must be able to do it. The cognitive underpinnings of these concepts are tested in the three experiments reported here. In Experiment 1, most participants judge that an agent ought to keep a promise (...)
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  9. added 2016-02-08
    W. Scott Cleveland (2015). The Emotions of Courageous Activity. Res Philosophica 92 (4):855-882.
    An apparent paradox concerning courageous activity is that it seems to require both fear and fearlessness – on the one hand, mastering one’s fear, and, on the other, eliminating fear. I resolve the paradox by isolating three phases of courageous activity: the initial response to the situation, the choice of courageous action, and the execution of courageous action. I argue that there is an emotion that is proper to each of these phases and that each emotion positively contributes to the (...)
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  10. added 2016-02-08
    W. Scott Cleveland (2012). The Distinctiveness of Intellectual Virtues. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 86:159-169.
    Robert Roberts and Jay Wood criticize St Thomas Aquinas’ distinction between intellectual and moral virtues. They offer three objections to this distinction. They object that intellectual virtues depend on the will in ways that undermine the distinction, that the subject of intellectual virtues is not an intellectual faculty but a whole person, and that some intellectual virtues require that the will act intellectually. They hold that each of these is sufficient to undermine the distinction. I defend Aquinas’ distinction and respond (...)
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  11. added 2016-02-07
    Mark Alfano & Don Loeb (2014). Experimental Moral Philosophy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  12. added 2016-02-07
    Markus Christen & Mark Alfano (2013). A Research Program for Empirically Informed Ethics. In Empirically Informed Ethics. Springer 3-27.
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  13. added 2016-02-07
    Markus Christen & Mark Alfano (2013). A Research Program for Empirically Informed Ethics. In Empirically Informed Ethics. Springer 3-27.
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  14. added 2016-02-07
    Markus Christen & Mark Alfano (2013). A Research Program for Empirically Informed Ethics. In Empirically Informed Ethics. Springer 3-27.
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  15. added 2016-02-07
    Markus Christen & Mark Alfano (2013). A Research Program for Empirically Informed Ethics. In Empirically Informed Ethics. Springer 3-27.
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  16. added 2016-02-06
    Markus Christen, Mark Alfano & Brian Robinson (forthcoming). A Multi-Modal, Cross-Cultural Study of the Semantics of Intellectual Humility. AI and Society.
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  17. added 2016-02-06
    Mark Alfano & Brian Robinson (forthcoming). Educating for Intellectual Humility and Other Paradoxical Virtues Requires Epistemic Anti-Individualism. Logos and Episteme.
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  18. added 2016-02-06
    Jacob Berger & Mark Alfano (2016). Virtue, Situationism, and the Cognitive Value of Art. The Monist 99 (2).
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  19. added 2016-02-05
    Eden Lin (forthcoming). How to Use the Experience Machine. Utilitas:1-19.
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  20. added 2016-02-05
    Mathew Coakley (forthcoming). Interpersonal Comparisons of the Good: Epistemic Not Impossible. Utilitas:1-26.
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  21. added 2016-02-05
    Steven Daskal (forthcoming). Original Position Models, Trade-Offs and Continuity. Utilitas:1-34.
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  22. added 2016-02-05
    Mauro Rossi (forthcoming). Value and Preference Relations: Are They Symmetric? Utilitas:1-15.
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  23. added 2016-02-05
    Andreas L. Mogensen (forthcoming). Should We Prevent Optimific Wrongs? Utilitas:1-12.
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  24. added 2016-02-05
    Alex Voorhoeve (forthcoming). Why One Should Count Only Claims with Which One Can Sympathize. Public Health Ethics.
    When one faces competing claims of varying strength on public resources for health, which claims count? This paper proposes the following answer. One should count, or aggregate, a person’s claim just in case one could sympathize with her desire to prioritize her own claim over the strongest competing claim. It argues that this principle yields appealing case judgments and has a plausible grounding in both sympathetic identification with each person, taken separately, and respect for the person for whom most is (...)
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  25. added 2016-02-05
    Julie Tannenbaum (2016). Richard Kraut, Against Absolute Goodness , Pp. Xii+ 224. Utilitas 28 (1):119-122.
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  26. added 2016-02-05
    Emmanuelle de Champs (2013). ‘Marcel, the Dancing-Master’: A Note on the Closing Lines of An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation. Utilitas 26 (1):120-123.
    In the ‘Concluding note’ to An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation, added in January 1789 to the original 1780 text, Bentham addresses highly theoretical questions in jurisprudence: ‘What is a law? What are the different parts of a law?’ He then demonstrates that only an imperative theory of legislation can provide adequate answers and provide the means to establish a precise nomenclature of legal phenomena. These broad questions sum up the work conducted in the manuscripts Of the (...)
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  27. added 2016-02-05
    Michael Quinn (2013). Bentham on Mensuration: Calculation and Moral Reasoning. Utilitas 26 (1):61-104.
    This article argues that Bentham was committed to attempting to measure the outcomes of rules by calculating the values of the pains and pleasures to which they gave rise. That pleasure was preferable to pain, and greater pleasure to less, were, for Bentham, foundational premises of rationality, whilst to abjure calculation was to abjure rationality. However, Bentham knew that the experience of pleasure and pain, the ‘simple’ entities which provided his objective moral standard, was not only subjective, and only indirectly (...)
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  28. added 2016-02-05
    Justin Weinberg (2013). Non-Identity Matters, Sometimes. Utilitas 26 (1):23-33.
    Suppose the only difference between the effects of two actions is to whom they apply: either to parties who would – or would not – exist if the actions were not performed. Is this a morally significant difference? This is one of the central questions raised by the Non-Identity Problem. Derek Parfit answers no, defending what he calls the ‘No-Difference View’. I argue that Parfit is mistaken and that sometimes this difference is morally significant. I do this by formulating a (...)
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  29. added 2016-02-05
    Will Braynen (2013). Moral Dimensions of Moral Hazards. Utilitas 26 (1):34-50.
    ‘Moral hazard’ is an economic term which commonly refers to situations in which people have a tendency to increase their exposure to risk when the costs of their actions, should they get unlucky, befall someone else. Once insured, for example, a person might have little reason, financially speaking, to be careful if he will get fully reimbursed for his losses should things go wrong, especially if he does not risk an increase in his insurance premium fees. In this article, I (...)
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  30. added 2016-02-05
    Luke Elson (2013). Borderline Cases and the Collapsing Principle. Utilitas 26 (1):51-60.
    John Broome has argued that value incommensurability is vagueness, by appeal to a controversial ‘collapsing principle’ about comparative indeterminacy. I offer a new counterexample to the collapsing principle. That principle allows us to derive an outright contradiction from the claim that some object is a borderline case of some predicate. But if there are no borderline cases, then the principle is empty. The collapsing principle is either false or empty.
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  31. added 2016-02-05
    Christopher Mcmahon (2013). Rawls, Reciprocity and the Barely Reasonable. Utilitas 26 (1):1-22.
    The concept of the reasonable plays an important role in Rawls's political philosophy, but there has been little systematic investigation of this concept or of the way Rawls employs it. This article distinguishes several different forms of reasonableness and uses them to explore Rawls's political liberalism. The discussion focuses on the idea, found especially in the most recent versions of this theory, of a family of liberal conceptions of justice each of which is regarded by everyone in a polity as (...)
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  32. added 2016-02-05
    Gerald Lang (2012). What's the Matter? Review of Derek Parfit, On What Matters — ERRATUM. Utilitas 24 (3):441.
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  33. added 2016-02-05
    Sarah Moses (2009). “Keeping the Heart”: Natural Affection in Joseph Butler's Approach to Virtue. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):613-629.
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  34. added 2016-02-05
    Duane K. Friesen & Bradley D. Guhr (2009). Metanoiaand Healing: Toward a Great Plains Land Ethic. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):723-753.
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  35. added 2016-02-05
    Keith Green (2007). Aquinas on Attachment, Envy, and Hatred in the Summa Theologica. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):403-428.
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  36. added 2016-02-05
    Theo A. Boer (2007). Recurring Themes in the Debate About Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):529-555.
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  37. added 2016-02-05
    J. Warren Smith (2007). Augustine and the Limits of Preemptive and Preventive War. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (1):141-162.
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  38. added 2016-02-05
    Ward Thomas (2007). Unjust War and the Catholic Soldier. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):509-525.
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  39. added 2016-02-05
    Michael P. Krom (2007). Modern Liberalism and Pride an Augustinian Perspective. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):453-477.
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  40. added 2016-02-05
    Graeme Smith (2007). Margaret Thatcher's Christian Faith: A Case Study in Political Theology. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):233-257.
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  41. added 2016-02-05
    Keith Green (2007). Aquinas's Argument Against Self-Hatred. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (1):113-139.
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  42. added 2016-02-05
    Daniel Zelinski (2007). From Prudence to Morality: A Case for the Morality of Some Forms of Nondualistic Mysticism. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):291-317.
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  43. added 2016-02-05
    Gerald J. Beyer (2007). A Theoretical Appreciation of the Ethic of Solidarity in Poland Twenty-Five Years After. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):207-232.
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  44. added 2016-02-05
    John Kelsay (2007). Comparison and History in the Study of Religious Ethics: An Essay on Michael Cook's Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):349-375.
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  45. added 2016-02-05
    Glen Pettigrove (2007). Forgiveness and Interpretation. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):429-452.
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  46. added 2016-02-05
    Christopher J. Eberle (2007). God, War, and Conscience. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):479-507.
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  47. added 2016-02-05
    J. Aaron Simmons (2007). What About Isaac?: Rereading Fear and Trembling and Rethinking Kierkegaardian Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):319-345.
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  48. added 2016-02-05
    Jeffrey Stout (2007). The Spirit of Democracy and the Rhetoric of Excess. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (1):3-21.
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  49. added 2016-02-05
    Roger Gustavsson (2007). Hauerwas's with the Grain of the Universe and the Barthian Outlook: A Few Observations. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (1):25-86.
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  50. added 2016-02-05
    Sumner B. Twiss (2006). On Cross-Cultural Conflict and Pediatric Intervention. Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (1):163-175.
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1 — 50 / 194