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  1. John F. Ahearne (1984). Nuclear Deterrence. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 59 (1):78-90.
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  2. Graham T. Allison, Robert Blackwill, Albert Carnesale, Joseph S. Nye & Robert P. Beschel (1990). A Primer for the Nuclear Age: Csia Occasional Paper No. 6. Upa.
    To find more information on Rowman & Littlefield titles, please visit us at www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
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  3. Lyle V. Anderson (1988). “Unintended” Nuclear War. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 1 (1):23-45.
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  4. Andrei Andrianov, Victor Kanke, Ilya Kuptsov & Viktor Murogov (2015). Reexamining the Ethics of Nuclear Technology. Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (4):999-1018.
    This article analyzes the present status, development trends, and problems in the ethics of nuclear technology in light of a possible revision of its conceptual foundations. First, to better recognize the current state of nuclear technology ethics and related problems, this article focuses on presenting a picture of the evolution of the concepts and recent achievements related to technoethics, based on the ethics of responsibility. The term ‘ethics of nuclear technology’ describes a multidisciplinary endeavor to examine the problems associated with (...)
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  5. S. I. Benn (1984). Deterrence or Appeasement? Or, On Trying to Be Rational About Nuclear War[1]. Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (1):5-20.
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  6. Jodi Burkett (2012). The Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament and Changing Attitudes Towards the Earth in the Nuclear Age. British Journal for the History of Science 45 (4):625-639.
    The nuclear age had a profound impact on politics and international affairs. More fundamentally, it altered the way people saw the planet and their relationship with it. These attitudes changed gradually in the post-war period, with the 1960s a key transitional moment. This article explores these changing attitudes towards the environment within the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament . At the beginning of the 1960s CND's concerns about nuclear testing and fallout fit easily into the dominant anthropocentric view of the environment. (...)
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  7. Jane Caputi (1994). Unthinkable Fathering: Connecting Incest and Nuclearism. Hypatia 9 (2):102 - 122.
    The examination of cultural productions with nuclear themes reveals the regular recurrence of the theme of incestuous fatherhood. Connections include a nuclear-father figure, one who threatens dependents while purportedly protecting them; the desecration of the future; the betrayal of trust; insidious long-term effects after initial harm; the shattering of safety; the cult of secrecy, aided by psychological defenses of denial, numbing, and splitting (in both survivor and perpetrator); the violation of life-preservative taboos; and survival.
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  8. Andrew Chrucky, The Greatest Problem in the World.
    Charles Whitney correctly reports that I believe that the greatest problems facing humanity are the nuclear threat and overpopulation. Both situations can lead -- one directly and the other indirectly -- to massive self-destruction. But he apparently contends that these problems exist as a result of political policies, and that they require a political solution. And by this token, he thinks, the greater problem for humanity is political organization. He goes on to lament that we, as a people, have been (...)
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  9. R. Paul Churchill (1989). Nuclear Deterrence and Nuclear Paternalism. Social Philosophy Today 2:191-204.
  10. Stephen J. Cimbala (1987). "Launch Under Attack": The War Nobody Wanted. Journal of Social Philosophy 18 (2):26-32.
  11. Ian Clark (1988). Waging War: A Philosophical Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    What is war, and how should it be waged? Are there restraints on its conduct? What can philosophers contribute to the study of warfare? Arguing that the practice of war requires a sound philosophical understanding, Ian Clark writes a fascinating synthesis of the philosophy, history, political theory, and contemporary strategy of warfare. Examining the traditional doctrines of the "just" and the "limited" war with fresh insight, Clark also addresses the applicability of these ideas to the modern issues of war crimes, (...)
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  12. Daniel Cordle (2012). Protect/Protest: British Nuclear Fiction of the 1980s. British Journal for the History of Science 45 (4):653-669.
    Analyses of nuclear fiction have tended to focus on the literature of the United States, particularly that of the 1950s. This article not only switches attention to British literature, but makes the case for the 1980s as a nuclear decade, arguing that the late Cold War context, especially renewed fears of global conflict, produced a distinctive nuclear literature and culture. Taking its cue from E.P. Thompson's rewriting of the British government's civil-defence slogan, ‘Protect and Survive’, as ‘Protest and Survive’, it (...)
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  13. Curt Covey (1985). Climatic Effects of Nuclear War. BioScience 35 (9):563-569.
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  14. Yuri P. Davydov (1985). Can a Nuclear War Be Limited to Europe? Scientia 79:51.
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  15. Joseph D. Douglass & Amoretta M. Hoeber (1981). Soviet Strategy for Nuclear War. Studies in Soviet Thought 22 (3):244-248.
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  16. Thomas E. Doyle (2013). Liberal Democracy and Nuclear Despotism: Two Ethical Foreign Policy Dilemmas. Ethics and Global Politics 6 (3):155-174.
    This article advances a critical analysis of John Rawls’s justification of liberal democratic nuclear deterrence in the post-Cold War era as found in The Law of Peoples. Rawls’s justification overlooked how nuclear-armed liberal democracies are ensnared in two intransigent ethical dilemmas: one in which the mandate to secure liberal constitutionalism requires both the preservation and violation of important constitutional provisions in domestic affairs, and the other in which this same mandate requires both the preservation and violation of the liberal commitment (...)
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  17. C. Dwayne Ethiridge (1980). Microprocessor Applications in the Nuclear Industry. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 10 (3-4):11-20.
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  18. S. M. G. (1964). The Case Against the Nuclear Atom. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 18 (1):178-178.
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  19. William C. Gay (1982). Myths About Nuclear War: Misconceptions in Public Belefs and Governmental Plan. Philosophy and Social Criticism 9 (2):116-144.
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  20. William C. Gay & Marysia Lemmond (1987). A Bibliography on Philosophy and the Nuclear Debate. Journal of Social Philosophy 18 (2):50-60.
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  21. Noel Gayler (1985). The Way Out: A General Nuclear Settlement. Scientia 79:245.
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  22. Ronald J. Glossop (1987). Teaching About Nuclear War. Teaching Philosophy 10 (2):141-145.
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  23. Herbert D. Grover & Mark A. Harwell (1985). Biological Effects of Nuclear War II: Impact on the Biosphere. BioScience 35 (9):576-583.
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  24. Herbert D. Grover & Gilbert F. White (1985). Toward Understanding the Effects of Nuclear War. BioScience 35 (9):552-556.
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  25. John Hampson & Evan E. Koslow (1977). Environmental Impact of Nuclear War. BioScience 27 (12):771-771.
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  26. Garrett Hardin (1985). Nuclear Winter The Cold and the Dark: The World After Nuclear War Paul R. Ehrlich Carl Sagan Donald Kennedy Walter Orr Roberts Nuclear Winter: The Human and Environmental Consequences of Nuclear War Mark A. Harwell. BioScience 35 (9):592-593.
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  27. Garrett Hardin (1985). Nuclear Winter. BioScience 35 (9):592-593.
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  28. Russell Hardin (1985). Book Review:Nuclear Pacifism: "Just War" Thinking Today. Edward J. Laarman; The Ethics of War and Nuclear Deterrence. James P. Sterba; When War Is Unjust: Being Honest in Just-War Thinking. John Howard Yoder. [REVIEW] Ethics 95 (3):763-.
  29. Russell Hardin (1983). Unilateral Versus Mutual Disarmament. Philosophy and Public Affairs 12 (3):236-254.
  30. C. Leon Harris (1984). Nuclear Winter. BioScience 34 (4):212-212.
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  31. Daniel L. Hartl (1973). The Nuclear Age Ecological Aspects of the Nuclear Age: Selected Readings in Radiation Ecology V. Schultz F. W. Whicker. BioScience 23 (8):499-499.
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  32. F. C. Hayes (1954). Philosophic Problems of Nuclear Science. Philosophy 29 (109):172-173.
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  33. Raphael J. Heffron & Besim Hatinoglu, Choice of Nuclear Technology and Legislative Certainty for Nuclear Safety and Liability in Turkey.
    This article assesses the legal and political nature of decision-making with regards to nuclear energy policy in Turkey. The main focus is on the choice of nuclear technology and the associated safety and liability issues for Turkey's new nuclear development plans. The article highlights the importance of legal certainty for both safety and liability in the nuclear energy sector. In particular, the liability regime in case of a nuclear accident must be clear and transparent. It also concludes that it is (...)
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  34. Monika K. Hellwig (1984). Soteriology in the Nuclear Age. The Thomist 48 (4):634.
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  35. Jonathan Hogg (2012). ‘The Family That Feared Tomorrow’: British Nuclear Culture and Individual Experience in the Late 1950s. British Journal for the History of Science 45 (4):535-549.
    Journalistic representations of a suicide pact in 1957 encapsulated wider popular assumptions on, and anxieties over, nuclear technology. Through an exploration of British nuclear culture in the late 1950s, this article suggests that knowledge of nuclear danger disrupted broader conceptions of self, nationhood and existence in British life. Building on Hecht's use of the term ‘nuclearity’, the article offers an alternative definition of the term whereby nuclearity is understood to mean the collection of assumptions held by individual citizens on the (...)
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  36. Jonathan Hogg & Christoph Laucht (2012). Introduction: British Nuclear Culture. British Journal for the History of Science 45 (4):479-493.
    In the extended introduction to this special issue on British nuclear culture, the guest editors outline the main historiographical and conceptual contours of British nuclear scholarship, and explore whether we can begin to define ‘British nuclear culture’ before introducing the contributors to this special issue, whose work we have organized into three broad areas. The first part is devoted to three articles that offer explicit and extended attempts to reconceptualize British nuclear culture, illuminating the complex links between nuclear science, the (...)
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  37. Jeff Hughes (2012). What is British Nuclear Culture?: Understanding Uranium 235. British Journal for the History of Science 45 (4):495-518.
    In the ever-expanding field of nuclear history, studies of ‘nuclear culture’ are becoming increasingly popular. Often situated within national contexts, they typically explore responses to the nuclear condition in the cultural modes of literature, art, music, theatre, film and other media, as well as nuclear imagery more generally. This paper offers a critique of current conceptions of ‘nuclear culture’, and argues that the term has little analytical coherence. It suggests that historians of ‘nuclear culture’ have tended to essentialize the nuclear (...)
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  38. Susan Hunter (1990). Nuclear Rights / Nuclear Wrongs. Social Philosophy Today 3:454-455.
  39. Gregory S. Kavka (1983). Doubts About Unilateral Nuclear Disarmament. Philosophy and Public Affairs 12 (3):255-260.
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  40. William H. Kincade (1985). Nuclear Weapons Free Zones: Their Role in Arms Control. Scientia 79:271.
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  41. Iu Ia Kirshin (1979). Prevention of World Nuclear War — the Global Problem of Our Time. Russian Studies in Philosophy 18 (3):83-99.
    Since the appearance of private property and the state, the attention of thinkers of many generations has been focused without interruption on questions of war and peace. Most, however, have been unable to explain these sociohistorical phenomena. A truly scientific theory of war and peace has been established only by the founders of Marxism-Leninism.
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  42. John Langan (1984). Struggling for Moral Clarity About Nuclear Deterrence. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 59 (1):91-98.
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  43. Steven Lee (1988). Morality, the SDI, and Limited Nuclear War. Philosophy and Public Affairs 17 (1):15-43.
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  44. Richard Maguire (2012). ‘Never A Credible Weapon’: Nuclear Cultures in British Government During the Era of the H-Bomb. British Journal for the History of Science 45 (4):519-533.
    This article explores British ‘nuclear culture’ by examining how individuals and groups within British government tried to comprehend nuclear weapons after the advent of the hydrogen bomb in 1952. It argues that thinking about nuclear weaponry was not uniform, and there was no monolithic ‘nuclear culture’ in government. Instead, political and social habits interacted with Cold War experience to create views of the nuclear weapon – nuclear cultures – that varied across government to create a diverse, and shifting, set of (...)
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  45. Nick Mansfield (2008). No Peace Without War, No War Without Peace : Deconstructing War. In Nicole Anderson & Katrina Schlunke (eds.), Cultural Theory in Everyday Practice. Oxford University Press
  46. John Mark Mattox (2011). The Moral Limits of a Nuclear Response to Nuclear Terrorism: A Response to Thomas E. Doyle II. Journal of Military Ethics 10 (4):309-315.
    Abstract This article responds to issues raised in Ethics, Nuclear Terrorism, and Counter-Terrorist Nuclear Reprisals ? A Response to John Mark Mattox's ?Nuclear Terrorism: The Other Extreme of Irregular Warfare? by Thomas E. Doyle II, also appearing in the pages of this issue.
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  47. Jyotirmay Mitra (1989). Nuclear Enigmas. BioScience 39 (10):736-738.
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  48. William E. Mumion (1987). Nuclear Violence: A Philosophical Framework for the Problem. Journal of Social Philosophy 18 (2):5-13.
    This has been more a programmatic than a substantive contribution to the moral problem of nuclear violence. Substantive issues of technology and tactics, of conventional and deterrent strategy, of political and social norms, of critical and theoretical foundations must all be addressed before there can be an adequate solution to this problem, not to speak of the revision of ethics it entails. These are, however, other questions. For lack of a comprehensive framework they have not always been properly addressed. The (...)
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  49. William V. O'Brien (1984). Proportion and Discrimination in Nuclear Deterrence and Defense. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 59 (1):41-52.
  50. Robert Palter (1964). Book Review:The Limits of Nuclear War. Paul Ramsey. [REVIEW] Ethics 75 (1):71-.
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