This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
133 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 133
  1. Michael Austin (2011). The Inner Life of Objects: Immanent Realism and Speculative Philosophy. Analecta Hermeneutica 3:1-12.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Michael Austin (2010). To Exist is to Change: A Friendly Disagreement with Graham Harman About Why Things Happen. Speculations 1 (1):66-83.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Tom Beckett & Graham Harman (2011). Interview with Graham Harman. Ask/Tell.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jane Bennett (2012). Systems and Things: A Response to Graham Harman and Timothy Morton. New Literary History 43 (2):225-233.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Ray Brassier, Iain Hamilton Grant, Graham Harman & Quentin Meillassoux (2007). Speculative Realism. Collapse:306-449.
  6. Levi R. Bryant (2014). Black. In Jeffrey Jerome Cohen (ed.), Prismatic Ecology: Ecotheory Beyond Green. University of Minnesota Press. 290-310.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Levi R. Bryant (2013). The Gravity of Things: An Introduction to Onto-Cartography. Anarchist Developments in Cultural Studies (ADCS) 2013 (2).
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Levi R. Bryant (2012). Substantial Powers, Active Affects: The Intentionality of Objects. Deleuze Studies 6 (4):529-543.
    What can Dungeons & Dragons teach us about the being of beings? This article argues that Dungeons & Dragons introduces us to a world composed of objects or entities, where the being of objects is defined not by their qualities, but rather by their powers, capacities or affects. Drawing on the thought of Spinoza, Deleuze and Molnar, objects are seen to be defined by what they can do or their capacities to act, such that qualities are effects of these acts. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Levi R. Bryant (2012). The Other Face of God: Lacan, Theological Structure, and the Accursed Remainder. Speculations:69-98.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Levi R. Bryant (2012). Posthuman Technologies. Umbr(A) 1:25-41.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Levi R. Bryant (2011). The Democracy of Objects. Open Humanities Press.
    Since Kant, philosophy has been obsessed with epistemological questions pertaining to the relationship between mind and world and human access to objects. In The Democracy of Objects Bryant proposes that we break with this tradition and once again initiate the project of ontology as first philosophy. Drawing on the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman, as well as the thought Roy Bhaskar, Gilles Deleuze, Niklas Luhman, Aristotle, Jacques Lacan, Bruno Latour and the developmental systems theorists, Bryant develops a realist ontology that (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Levi R. Bryant (2011). A Logic of Multiplicities: Deleuze, Immanence, and Onticology. Analecta Hermeneutica 3:1-20.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Levi R. Bryant (2011). The Ontic Principle: Outline of an Object-Oriented Ontology. In Levi R. Bryant, Nick Srnicek & Graham Harman (eds.), The Speculative Turn: Continental Materialism and Realism. re.press.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Levi R. Bryant (2011). Of Parts and Politics: Onticology and Queer Politics. Identities 16:13-28.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Levi R. Bryant (2011). Wilderness Ontology. In Celina Jeffrey (ed.), Preternatural. punctum books.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Levi R. Bryant (2011). On the Reality and Construction of Hyperobjects with Reference to Class. Speculations:86-103.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. John D. Caputo (2012). Continental Philosophy of Religion: Then, Now, and the Tomorrow. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (2):347-360.
  18. Clayton Crockett (2012). Quentin Meillassoux: After Finitude: An Essay on the Necessity of Contingency, Trans. Ray Brassier. London and New York: Continuum, 2008, $27.95 (Hb); $19.95 (Pb). Graham Harman, Quentin Meillassoux: Philosophy in the Making, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011, Viii and 247 Pp. $110.00 (Hb); $32.00 (Pb). [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 71 (3):251-255.
    Quentin Meillassoux: After finitude: an essay on the necessity of contingency, trans. Ray Brassier. London and New York: Continuum, 2008, 27.95 ( hb );19.95 (pb). Graham Harman, Quentin Meillassoux: Philosophy in the making, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011, viii and 247 pp. 110.00 ( hb );32.00 (pb). Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s11153-012-9341-x Authors Clayton Crockett, University of Central Arkansas, 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway, AR 72035, USA Journal International Journal for Philosophy of Religion Online ISSN (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Brian Davis & Graham Harman, On Landscape Ontology: An Interview with Graham Harman.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Paul Ennis (2011). Copernican Metaphysics. Continent 1 (2):94-101.
    In the Kritik der reinen Vernunft (1781) Kant introduced the transcendental method on a precarious footing and he never shied away from the fact that the transcendental method is structured, and I mean it in the most direct sense possible, aporetically. The aporetic element, the unstable core within Kantian thought, is the distinction between phenomenal and noumenal content in the chapter entitled "On the ground of the distinction [Unterscheidung] of all objects [Gegenstände] in general into phenomena and noumena" (Kant A236/B295-A260/B315). (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Paul Ennis (2011). Continental Realism. Zero Books.
    In Continental Realism Paul Ennis tackles the rise of realist metaphysics in contemporary continental philosophy. Pitted against the dominant antirealist and transcendental continental hegemony Ennis argues that continental thinking must establish an alliance between metaphysics, speculation, and realism if we are to truly get back to the things themselves.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Paul Ennis (ed.) (2010). Post-Continental Voices: Selected Interviews. Zero Books.
    This collection of interviews brings together seven post-continental thinkers to discuss their own personal academic development, their experiences of graduate school and their hopes for post-continental philosophy. Each thinker has been chosen for their importance, popularity and potential. Opening with a short introduction this book offers a rare insight into the world of academic philosophy from the inside. Acting as a handbook to post-continental philosophy this book will prepare students for the unique challenges facing academic philosophy in the coming years. (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Mark Fisher (2009). Without Criteria/Prince of Networks. [REVIEW] Frieze (125).
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Mark Fisher (2008). Clearing the Air. Frieze (February 20).
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jay Foster (2011). Ontologies Without Metaphysics: Latour, Harman, and the Philosophy of Things. Analecta Hermeneutica 3:1-26.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Alexander Galloway (2012). The Poverty of Philosophy: Realism and Post-Fordism. Critical Inquiry 39 (2):347-366.
  27. Martin Goffeney (2013). Memory, History, and Pluripotency: A Realist View of Literary Studies. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (2):44-59.
    Speculative realism has, over the course of its rapid and controversial emergence in the past decade, been frequently criticized from the perspective of historical materialism, for its putative reliance on abstraction and eschewal of a sufficiently rigorous ideological alignment. This paper takes such critiques as a starting point for an examination of the contributions recent thought in the area of speculative realism has to offer the study of the humanities – specifically, the study of literature and literary history. In particular, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Andrew Goffey (2009). REVIEWS-Graham Harman-Prince of Networks: Bruno Latour and Metaphysics. Radical Philosophy 158:47.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Peter Gratton (2013). Post-Deconstrcuctive Realism: It's About Time. Speculations (IV):84-90.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Peter Gratton (2010). Tim Morton, The Ecological Thought. [REVIEW] Speculations 1 (1):192-199.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Peter Gratton, Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Levi Bryant & Paul Ennis (2010). Interviews: Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Ian Bogost, Levi Bryant and Paul Ennis. Speculations 1 (1):84-134.
    The context for these interviews was a seminar [Peter Gratton] conducted on speculative realism in the Spring 2010. There has been great interest in speculative realism and one reason Gratton surmise[s] is not just the arguments offered, though [Gratton doesn't] want to take away from them; each of these scholars are vivid writers and great pedagogues, many of whom are in constant contact with their readers via their weblogs. Thus these interviews provided an opportunity to forward student questions about their (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Graham Harman (2014). Stengers on Emergence. Biosocieties 9 (1):99-104.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Graham Harman (2014). Badiou's Horses and Baudelaire's Cats. In Caroline Picard (ed.), Ghost Nature. 31-41.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Graham Harman (2014). Gold. In Jeffrey Jerome Cohen (ed.), Prismatic Ecology: Ecotheory Beyond Green. University of Minnesota Press. 106-123.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Graham Harman (2013). The Revenge of the Surface: Heidegger, McLuhan, Greenberg. Paletten (291/292):66-73.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Graham Harman (2013). Undermining, Overmining, and Duomining: A Critique. In Jenna Sutela (ed.), ADD Metaphysics. Aalto University Design Research Laboratory.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Graham Harman (2013). Tristan Garcia and the Thing-In-Itself. Parrhesia (16):26-34.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Graham Harman (2013). An Outline of Object-Oriented Philosophy. Science Progress 96 (2):187-199.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Graham Harman (2013). Objects Are the Root of All Philosophy. In Penny Harvey, Eleanor Conlin Castella, Gillian Evans & Hannah Knox (eds.), Objects and Materials: A Routledge Companion. Routledge.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Graham Harman (2013). Aristotle with a Twist. In Eileen A. Joy, Anna Klosowska, Nicola Masciandro & Michael O'Rourke (eds.), Speculative Medievalisms: Discography. punctum books.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Graham Harman (2013). Objets Et Architecture/Objects and Architecture. In Marie-Ange Brayer & Frédéric Migayrou (eds.), Naturaliser l’Architecture/Naturalizing Architecture. Editions HYX.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Graham Harman (2013). Bells and Whistles: More Speculative Realism. Zero Books.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Graham Harman (2013). Conclusions: Assemblage Theory and its Future. In Michele Acuto & Simon Curtis (eds.), Reassembling International Theory: Assemblage Thinking and International Relation. Palgrave Macmillan. 118-131.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Graham Harman (2013). The Current State of Speculative Realism. Speculations (IV):22-28.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Graham Harman (2012). On the Supposed Societies of Chemicals, Atoms, and Stars in Gabriel Tarde. In Godofredo Pereira (ed.), Savage Objects.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Graham Harman (2012). Concerning Stephen Hawking's Claim That Philosophy is Dead. Filozofski Vestnik 32 (2):11-22.
    The article begins from Stephen Hawking's well-known claim that philosophy is dead, and considers several other quotations in which philosophy is either belittled or subordinated outright to the natural sciences. This subordination requires a downward reductionism that is paralleled by the upward reductionism of the linguistic turn and social constructionist theories. Rather than undermining or overmining mid-sized individual entities, philosophy must deal with objects on their own terms. This suggests a possible tactical alliance between philosophy and the arts.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Graham Harman (2012). Violence and Splendor. Singularum 1:2-17.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Graham Harman (2012). Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy. Zero Books.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Graham Harman (2012). Object-Oriented France: The Philosophy of Tristan Garcia. Continent 2 (1):6-21.
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 6–21. The French philosopher and novelist Tristan Garcia was born in Toulouse in 1981. This makes him rather young to have written such an imaginative work of systematic philosophy as Forme et objet , 1 the latest entry in the MétaphysiqueS series at Presses universitaires de France. But this reference to Garcia’s youthfulness is not a form of condescension: by publishing a complete system of philosophy in the grand style, he has already done what none of us (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Graham Harman (2012). The Mesh, the Strange Stranger, and Hyperobjects: Morton’s Ecological Ontology. Tarp 2 (1):16-19.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 133