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  1. G. Abend (2013). What the Science of Morality Doesn't Say About Morality. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (2):157-200.
    In this article I ask what recent moral psychology and neuroscience can and can’t claim to have discovered about morality. I argue that the object of study of much recent work is not morality but a particular kind of individual moral judgment. But this is a small and peculiar sample of morality. There are many things that are moral yet not moral judgments. There are also many things that are moral judgments yet not of that particular kind. If moral things (...)
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  2. Joseph Agassi (2013). Book Review: Tacit and Explicit Knowledge. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (2):275-279.
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  3. Joseph Agassi (2007). What Collapse, Exactly? Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (1):74-84.
    Hilary Putnam makes two related points in his recent collection of essays: (1) Values can be rational, and their inescapable intrusion into every kind of discourse is welcome. (2) Ignoring or suppressing this fact is common yet irrational. This is of course true; yet the intrusion in question can be trivial, and it can be problematic. Putnam ignores this here. The book is pleasant to read; it is infused with friendly and appreciative personal anecdotes and observations. It is almost entirely (...)
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  4. Nimrod Bar-Am (2013). Book Review: Popper, Objectivity, and the Growth of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (3):397-400.
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  5. Susan E. Bernick (1991). Toward a Value-Laden Theory: Feminism and Social Science. Hypatia 6 (2):118 - 136.
    Marjorie Shostak's ethnography, Nisa: The Life and Words of a !Kung Woman, is analyzed as a case study of feminist social science. Three principles of feminist research are suggested as standards for evaluation. After discussion of the principles and analysis of the text, I raise a criticism of the principles as currently sketched. The entire project is framed by the question of how best to resolve conflict between researcher and participant accounts.
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  6. Gérald Berthoud & Beat Sitter-Liver (eds.) (1996). The Responsible Scholar: Ethical Considerations in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Watson Pub. International.
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  7. William P. Brandon (1982). "Fact" and "Value" in the Thought of Peter Winch: Linguistic Analysis Broaches Metaphysical Questions. Political Theory 10 (2):215-244.
    Collingwood's... descendants... will be engaged in conceptual analysis not unlike other modern forms of conceptual analysis but not so isolated, in principle and in practice, from the panorama of the human past, from the rich diversity of contemporary cultures, and from the perplexities of individual experience in art, religion, the privacies of thought, and the publicity of action. They will search out the a priori elements in experience and the empirical genesis of thought. They may try, although they will surely (...)
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  8. Thomas Brante (2010). Review Essay: Perspectival Realism, Representational Models, and the Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 40 (1):107-117.
    In this book, Ronald Giere seeks to resolve the opposition between objectivism and constructivism by suggesting a third way, perspectival realism, according to which both sides are partly right. To prove his case, Giere reconstructs some of the acknowledged puzzle pieces in the philosophy of science (theory, observation, etc.). To my mind, of most interest is the piece Giere calls “representional model.” Constituting the basis of every science, it functions as a template that governs data collection as well as theory (...)
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  9. Maria Stella Martins Bresciani (2005). O Charme da Ciência E a Sedução da Objetividade: Oliveira Vianna Entre Intérpretes Do Brasil. Editora Unesp.
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  10. Matthew J. Brown (2013). Science, Values, and Democracy in the Global Climate Change Debate. In Shane Ralston (ed.), Philosophical Pragmatism and International Relations: Essays for a Bold New World. Lexington. 127-158.
    This chapter will develop and apply ideas drawn from and inspired by Dewey’s work on science and democracy to the context of international relations (IR). I will begin with Dewey’s views on the nature of democracy, which lead us into his philosophy of science. I will show that scientific and policy inquiry are inextricably related processes, and that they both have special requirements in a democratic context. There are some challenges applying these ideas to the IR case, but these challenges (...)
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  11. H. H. Bruun (2009). Book Review: McFalls, Laurence (Ed.). (2007). Max Weber's "Objectivity" Reconsidered. Toronto, Canada: University of Toronto Press. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (3):535-539.
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  12. Hans Henrik Bruun (2008). Objectivity, Value Spheres, and "Inherent Laws": On Some Suggestive Isomorphisms Between Weber, Bourdieu, and Luhmann. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (1):97-120.
    I give an account of Max Weber's views concerning the basis of the objectivity of the cultural sciences. In this connection, I offer a critical discussion of his distinction between different "value spheres," each with its own "intrinsic logic." I then consider parallels between Weber's "value spheres" and central elements of Bourdieu's field theory and Luhmann's systems theory, and try to show to what extent Bourdieu's and Luhmann's problems, and the solutions they suggest, can be seen as similar to Weber's. (...)
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  13. Jiwei Ci (2011). Social Science and the Diversity of Its Roles for Democracy. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 25 (2):179 - 190.
  14. Rory J. Conces (1997). Blurred Visions: Philosophy, Science, and Ideology in a Troubled World. Peter Lang.
  15. Sharon Crasnow (2004). Review: Objectivity: Feminism, Values, and Science. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (1):280 - 291.
  16. Frank Cunningham (1980). In Defence of Objectivity. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 10 (4):417-426.
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  17. Ronald Curtis (1993). The Essential Nature of the Method of the Natural Sciences: Response to A T Nuyen's Truth, Method, and Objectivity. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (1):73-76.
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  18. Fred D'Agostino (1995). Social Science as a Social Institution: Neutrality and the Politics of Social Research. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (3):396-405.
    Philosophy of Social Science, that social scientific investigations do not and cannot meet the liberal requirement of "neutrality" most familiar to social scientists in the form of Max Weber's requirement of value-freedom. He argues, moreover, that this is for "institutional," not idiosyncratic, reasons: methodological demands (e.g., of validity) impel social scientists to pass along into their "objective" investigations the values of the people, groups, and cultures they are studying. In this paper, I consider the implications of Root's claims for the (...)
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  19. Mark Diesendorf (1982). Science Under Social and Political Pressures. In D. R. Oldroyd (ed.), Science and Ethics: Papers Presented at a Symposium Held Under the Aegis of the Australian Academy of Science, University of New South Wales, November 7, 1980. New South Wales University Press.
  20. Paul Diesing (1972). Subjectivity and Objectivity in the Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 2 (1):147-165.
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  21. Matt L. Drabek (2010). Interactive Classification and Practice in the Social Sciences. Poroi 6 (2):62-80.
    This paper examines the ways in which social scientific discourse and classification interact with the objects of social scientific investigation. I examine this interaction in the context of the traditional philosophical project of demarcating the social sciences from the natural sciences. I begin by reviewing Ian Hacking’s work on interactive classification and argue that there are additional forms of interaction that must be treated.
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  22. David A. Duquette (1995). Philosophy, Anthropology, and Universal Human Rights. Social Philosophy Today 11:139-153.
  23. Morris Eames (1979). Scientific Grounds for Valuational Norms. Journal of Social Philosophy 10 (3):1-3.
  24. Regis A. Factor & Stephen P. Turner (1979). The Limits of Reason and Some Limitations of Weber's Morality. Human Studies 2 (1):301 - 334.
  25. Paul K. Feyerabend (1978). From Incompetent Professionalism to Professionalized Incompetence—the Rise of a New Breed of Intellectuals. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 8 (1):37-53.
  26. James E. Fleming & Sanford Levinson (eds.) (2012). Evolution and Morality. NYU Press.
    Part I. Naturalistic ethics -- Part II. Law and behavioral morality -- Part III. Biopolitical science.
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  27. R. G. Frey (1978). Contributory Causation and the Objectivity of the Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 8 (2):175-179.
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  28. R. G. Frey (1978). Contributory Causation and Objectivity: A Final Instalment. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 8 (2):182-183.
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  29. A. C. Genova (1976). Can a Scientific Theory Legitimately Be Restricted on Ethical or Political Grounds? Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 7 (1):119-127.
  30. Tracy L. Gonzalez-Padron, O. C. Ferrell, Linda Ferrell & Ian A. Smith (2012). A Critique of Giving Voice to Values Approach to Business Ethics Education. Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (4):251-269.
    Mary Gentile’s Giving Voice to Values presents an approach to ethics training based on the idea that most people would like to provide input in times of ethical conflict using their own values. She maintains that people recognize the lapses in organizational ethical judgment and behavior, but they do not have the courage to step up and voice their values to prevent the misconduct. Gentile has developed a successful initiative and following based on encouraging students and employees to learn how (...)
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  31. Leonid Grinin, Peter Herrmann, Andrey Korotayev & Arno Tausch (eds.) (2010). History & Mathematics: Processes and Models of Global Dynamics.
    A more and more important role is played by new directions in historical research that study long-term dynamic processes and quantitative changes. This kind of history can hardly develop without the application of mathematical methods. The history is studied more and more as a system of various processes, within which one can detect waves and cycles of different lengths – from a few years to several centuries, or even millennia. This issue is the third collective monograph in the series of (...)
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  32. Alan G. Gross (2000). The Science Wars and the Ethics of Book Reviewing. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 30 (3):445-450.
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  33. Zehavit Gross (2013). The Attitudes of Israeli Arab and Jewish High School Students Towards Extrinsic and Intrinsic Values. Journal of Moral Education 42 (1):88-101.
  34. M. Gunther & K. Reshaur (1971). Science and Values in Political "Science". Philosophy of the Social Sciences 1 (1):113-121.
  35. Martyn Hammersley (2005). Should Social Science Be Critical? Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (2):175-195.
    has become an honorific title used by researchers to commend their work, or the particular approach they adopt. Conversely, the work of others is often dismissed on the grounds that it is "uncritical". However, there are important questions about what the term critical means, about what we should be critical of, and about the form that criticism ought to take. These questions are addressed here in relation to both the role of the social researcher itself and that of researchers operating (...)
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  36. Sandra Harding (1990). Starting Thought From Women's Lives: Eight Resources for Maximizing Objectivity. Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):140-149.
  37. David Henderson (2002). Norms, Normative Principles, and Explanation: On Not Getting is From Ought. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (3):329-364.
    It seems that hope springs eternal for the cherished idea that norms (or normativeprinciples) explain actions or regularities in actions. But it also seems thatthere are many ways of going wrong when taking norms and normative principlesas explanatory. The author argues that neither norms nor normative principles—insofar as they are the sort of things with normative force—is explanatoryof what is done. He considers the matter using both erotetic and ontic models ofexplanation. He further considers various understandings of norms. Key Words: (...)
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  38. Christopher Hodgkinson (1996). Administrative Philosophy: Values and Motivations in Administrative Life. Pergamon.
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  39. Robert Hollinger (1975). Can a Scientific Theory Be Legitimately Criticized, Rejected, Condemned, or Suppressed on Ethical or Political Grounds? Journal of Value Inquiry 9 (4):303-306.
  40. L. E. E. J. & CHRISTIAN D. SCHUNN (2011). Social Biases and Solutions for Procedural Objectivity. Hypatia 26 (2):352-373.
    An empirically sensitive formulation of the norms of transformative criticism must recognize that even public and shared standards of evaluation can be implemented in ways that unintentionally perpetuate and reproduce forms of social bias that are epistemically detrimental. Helen Longino's theory can explain and redress such social bias by treating peer evaluations as hypotheses based on data and by requiring a kind of perspectival diversity that bears, not on the content of the community's knowledge claims, but on the beliefs and (...)
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  41. Roland Jackson, Fiona Barbagallo & Helen Haste (2005). Strengths of Public Dialogue on Science‐Related Issues. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (3):349-358.
    This essay describes the value and validity of public dialogue on science?related issues. We define what is meant by ?dialogue?, the context within which dialogue takes place in relation to science, and the purposes of dialogue. We introduce a model to describe and analyse the practice of dialogue, at different stages in the development of science, its applications and their consequences. Finally, we place the practice of dialogue on science?related issues in relation to the wider political process and draw out (...)
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  42. P. A. Johnson (1986). Book Reviews : The Need for Interpretation--Contemporary Conceptions of the Philosopher's Task. Edited by Sollace Mitchell and Michael Rosen. Atlantic Highlands, N.J.: Humanities Press, 1983. Pp. VIII + 182. $29.50 (Hardback. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 16 (4):503-505.
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  43. Todd Jones (1999). Arbitrary Arbitrariness: Reply to Segal. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 29 (2):310-314.
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  44. Robert Welsh Jordan (2001). Hartmann, Schutz, and the Hermeneutics of Action. Axiomathes 12 (3-4):327-338.
    Hartmann's way of conceiving what he terms "the actual ought-to-be [aktuales Seinsollen]" offers a fruitful approach to crucial issues in the phenomenology of action. The central issue to be dealt with concerns the description of the "constitution" of anticipated possibilities as projects for action. Such potentialities are termed "problematic possibilities" and are contrasted with "open possibilities" in most of the works published by Husserl as well as those published by Alfred Schutz. The description given by Alfred Schutz emphasized that the (...)
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  45. F. M. Kamm (2009). Neuroscience and Moral Reasoning: A Note on Recent Research. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (4):330-345.
  46. Jonathan Katz (1989). Rational Common Ground in the Sociology of Knowledge. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 19 (3):257-271.
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  47. John Kekes (1979). Rationality and the Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 9 (1):105-113.
  48. Kieran Keohane (1993). Central Problems in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences After Postmodernism: Reconciling Consensus and Hegemonic Theories of Epistemology and Political Ethics. Philosophy and Social Criticism 19 (2):145-169.
  49. Kyung-Man Kim (1996). Hierarchy of Scientific Consensus and the Flow of Dissensus Over Time. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 26 (1):3-25.
    During the last few years, several sociological accounts of scientific consensus appeared in which a radically skeptical view of cognitive consensus in science was advocated. Challenging the traditional realist conception of scientific consensus as a sui generis social fact, the radical skeptics claim to have shown that the traditional historical sociologist's supposedly definitive account of scientific consensus is only a linguistic chimera that easily can be deconstructed by the application of different interpretive schema to the given data. I will argue (...)
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  50. Harold Kincaid (2009). Fact and Value in Democratic Theory. In Jeroen Van Bouwel (ed.), The Social Sciences and Democracy. Palgrave Macmillan.
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