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  1. C. Anthony Anderson (1990). Some Emendations of Gödel's Ontological Proof. Faith and Philosophy 7 (3):291-303.
    Kurt Gödel’s version of the ontological argument was shown by J. Howard Sobel to be defective, but some plausible modifications in the argument result in a version which is immune to Sobel’s objection. A definition is suggested which permits the proof of some of Godel’s axioms.
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  2. Leslie Armour (1960). The Ontological Argument and the Concepts of Completeness and Selection. Review of Metaphysics 14 (2):280 - 291.
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  3. Oded Balaban & Asnat Avshalom (1990). The Ontological Argument Reconsidered. Journal of Philosophical Research 15:279-310.
    The ontological argument--first proposed by St. Anselm and subsequently deveIoped by Descartes, Leibniz, Kant, Hegel and Marx--furnishes a key to understanding the relationship between thought and reality. In this article we shall focus on Hegel’s attitude towards the ontological argument as set out in his Science of Logic, where it appears as a paradigm of the relationship between thought and reality. It should be remarked, moreover, that our choice of the subject was not random and that it was seIected for (...)
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  4. Albert G. A. Balz (1953). Concerning the Ontological Argument. Review of Metaphysics 7 (2):207 - 224.
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  5. Pierfrancesco Basile (2010). Kant, Spinoza, and the Metaphysics of the Ontological Proof. Metaphysica 11 (1):17-37.
    This paper provides an interpretation and evaluation of Spinoza's highly original version of the ontological proof in terms of the concept of substance instead of the concept of perfection in the first book of his Ethics. Taking the lead from Kant'€™s critique of ontological arguments in the Critique of Pure Reason, the paper explores the underlying ontological and epistemological presuppositions of Spinoza'€™s proof. The main topics of consideration are the nature of Spinoza's definitions, the way he conceives of the relation (...)
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  6. Stephen T. Davis (1976). Does the Ontological Argument Beg the Question? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 7 (4):433 - 442.
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  7. Daniel A. Dombrowski (2006). Rethinking the Ontological Argument: A Neoclassical Theistic Response. Cambridge University Press.
    In recent years, the ontological argument and theistic metaphysics have been criticized by philosophers working in both the analytic and continental traditions. Responses to these criticisms have primarily come from philosophers who make use of the traditional, and problematic, concept of God. In this volume, Daniel A. Dombrowski defends the ontological argument against its contemporary critics, but he does so by using a neoclassical or process concept of God, thereby strengthening the case for a contemporary theistic metaphysics. Relying on the (...)
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  8. James Hardy (1996). Burdens of Proof. Journal of Philosophical Research 21:321-330.
    Proponents of modal versions of the ontological argument have traditionally defended the prernise that God possibly exists by arguing that such a premise is more plausible than its negation. In this paper I argue that such a defense is insufficient to justify acceptance of the premise within the scope of a modal proof, and that this insufficiency accounts for the lack of probative force of these versions of the ontological argument. Rather, I claim that what is needed is a defense (...)
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  9. William Hasker (1982). Is There a Second Ontological Argument? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):93 - 101.
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  10. James Kellenberger (1999). The Fool of the Psalms and Religious Epistemology. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 45 (2):99-113.
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  11. Srećko Kovač (2012). Modal Collapse in Gödel's Ontological Proof. In Miroslaw Szatkowski (ed.), Ontological Proofs Today. Ontos Verlag. 50--323.
    After introductory reminder of and comments on Gödel’s ontological proof, we discuss the collapse of modalities, which is provable in Gödel’s ontological system GO. We argue that Gödel’s texts confirm modal collapse as intended consequence of his ontological system. Further, we aim to show that modal collapse properly fits into Gödel’s philosophical views, especially into his ontology of separation and union of force and fact, as well as into his cosmological theory of the nonobjectivity of the lapse of time. As (...)
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  12. J. R. Lucas, The Ontological Argument.
    The ontological argument has run for a long time, regularly refuted, regularly re-appearing in a new form. Something can be learnt from its longevity. Its proponents must be on to something, or it would not have survived its many refutations. But equally, it must have been much misformulated, or it would not have seemed evidently fallacious to its many critics. Perhaps it does express a deep philosophical intimation. Certainly it has been taken to prove more than it really can establish. (...)
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  13. Gareth B. Matthews & Lynne Rudder Baker (2010). The Ontological Argument Simplified. Analysis 70 (2):210-212.
    The ontological argument in Anselm’s Proslogion II continues to generate a remarkable store of sophisticated commentary and criticism. However, in our opinion, much of this literature ignores or misrepresents the elegant simplicity of the original argument. The dialogue below seeks to restore that simplicity, with one important modification. Like the original, it retains the form of a reductio, which we think is essential to the argument’s great genius. However, it seeks to skirt the difficult question of whether 'exists' is a (...)
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  14. Jason Megill & Joshua M. Mitchell (2009). A Modest Modal Ontological Argument. Ratio 22 (3):338-349.
    We formulate a new modal ontological argument; specifically, we show that there is a possible world in which an entity that has at least the property of omnipotence exists. Then we argue that if such an entity is possible, it is necessary as well.
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  15. Yujin Nagasawa (2010). The Ontological Argument and the Devil. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (238):72-91.
    The 'parody objection' to the ontological argument for the existence of God advances parallel arguments apparently proving the existence of various absurd entities. I discuss recent versions of the parody objection concerning the existence of 'AntiGod' and the devil, as introduced by Peter Millican and Timothy Chambers. I argue that the parody objection always fails, because any parody is either (i) not structurally parallel to the ontological argument, or (ii) not dialectically parallel to the ontological argument. Moreover, once a parody (...)
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  16. Yujin Nagasawa (2007). Millican on the Ontological Argument. Mind 116 (464):1027-1040.
    Peter Millican (2004) provides a novel and elaborate objection to Anselm's ontological argument. Millican thinks that his objection is more powerful than any other because it does not dispute contentious 'deep philosophical theories' that underlie the argument. Instead, it tries to reveal the 'fatal flaw' of the argument by considering its 'shallow logical details'. Millican's objection is based on his interpretation of the argument, according to which Anselm relies on what I call the 'principle of the superiority of existence' (PSE). (...)
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  17. Michael J. O'Neill (2006). A Peculiar “Faith”: On R.G. Collingwood's Use of Saint Anselm's Argument. Saint Anselm Journal 3 (2):32-47.
    In this paper, I discuss the role of Anselm’s ontological argument in the philosophy of R.G. Collingwood. Anselm’s argument appears prominently in Collingwood’s Essay on Philosophical Method (1933) and Essay on Metaphysics (1940), as well as in his early work Speculum Mentis (1924). In the proof, Collingwood finds the central expression of the priority of “faith” in the first principles of thought to reason’s activities. For Collingwood, it is Anselm’s proof that clearly expresses this relationship between faith and reason. The (...)
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  18. Paul E. Oppenheimer & Edward N. Zalta (1991). On the Logic of the Ontological Argument. Philosophical Perspectives 5:509-529.
    In this paper, the authors show that there is a reading of St. Anselm's ontological argument in Proslogium II that is logically valid (the premises entail the conclusion). This reading takes Anselm's use of the definite description "that than which nothing greater can be conceived" seriously. Consider a first-order language and logic in which definite descriptions are genuine terms, and in which the quantified sentence "there is an x such that..." does not imply "x exists". Then, using an ordinary logic (...)
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  19. Paul Oppenheimer & Edward N. Zalta (2011). A Computationally-Discovered Simplification of the Ontological Argument. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (2):333 - 349.
    The authors investigated the ontological argument computationally. The premises and conclusion of the argument are represented in the syntax understood by the automated reasoning engine PROVER9. Using the logic of definite descriptions, the authors developed a valid representation of the argument that required three non-logical premises. PROVER9, however, discovered a simpler valid argument for God's existence from a single non-logical premise. Reducing the argument to one non-logical premise brings the investigation of the soundness of the argument into better focus. Also, (...)
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  20. Graham Oppy (2008). The Ontological Argument. In Paul Copan & Chad V. Meister (eds.), Philosophy of Religion: Classic and Contemporary Issues. Blackwell Pub..
    In "The Ontological Argument", Philosophy 63, 1988, pp.83 91) Stephen Makin offers a defence of what he calls "Anselm's Ontological Argument". I am not much interested in the question whether the argument which Makin defends can properly be attributed to St. Anselm, though I suspect that there is considerable room for disagreement on this score; rather, I want to suggest that the argument which Makin offers is quite clearly invalid (and hence unsound) -and I also want to suggest that it (...)
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  21. Peter B. Todd (2013). Teilhard and Other Modern Thinkers on Evolution, Mind, and Matter. Teilhard Studies (66):1-22.
    In his The Phenomenon of Man, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin develops concepts of consciousness, the noosphere, and psychosocial evolution. This paper explores Teilhard’s evolutionary concepts as resonant with thinking in psychology and physics. It explores contributions from archetypal depth psychology, quantum physics, and neuroscience to elucidate relationships between mind and matter. Teilhard’s work can be seen as advancing this psychological lineage or psychogenesis. That is, the evolutionary emergence of matter in increasing complexity from sub-atomic particles to the human brain and (...)
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  22. Peter B. Todd (ed.) (2012). The Individuation of God:Integrating Science and Religion. Chiron Publications.
    Todd argues for the integration of science and religion to form a new paradigm for the third millennium. He counters both the arguments made by fundamentalist Christians against science and the rejection of religion by the New Atheists, in particular Richard Dawkins and his followers. Drawing on the work of scientists, psychologists, philosophers, and theologians, Todd challenges the materialistic reductionism of our age and offers an alternative grounded in the visionary work taking place in a wide array of disciplines including (...)
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  23. William F. Vallicella (2000). Does the Cosmological Argument Depend on the Ontological? Faith and Philosophy 17 (4):441-458.
    Does the cosmological argument (CA) depend on the ontological (OA)? That depends. If the OA is an argument “from mere concepts,” then no; if the OA is an argument from possibility, then yes. That is my main thesis. Along the way, I explore a number of subsidiary themes, among them, the nature of proof in metaphysics, and what Kant calls the “mystery of absolute necessity.”.
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  24. Peter van Inwagen (2009). Some Remarks on the Modal Ontological Argument. Philo 12 (2):217-227.
    This paper examines the so-called modal ontological argument. It pays special attention to the role that the symmetry and transitivity of the accessibility relation play in the argument, and examines various approaches to a defense of the “possibility premise,” the premise of the argument that states that the existence of a perfect being is metaphysically possible. It contains an analysis of Gödel’s attempt to show that this premise is true, and of a recent formulation by David Johnson of Gödel’s argument.
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Anselm's Ontological Argument
  1. István Aranyosi (2013). God, Mind, and Logical Space. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In God, Mind and Logical Space István Aranyosi takes the reader on a journey for the mind by revisiting the fundamental questions and the everlasting debates in philosophy of religion, ontology, and the philosophy of mind. The first part deals with issues in ontology, and the author puts forward a radical view according to which all thinkable objects and states of affairs have an equal claim to existence in a way that renders existence a relative notion. In the second part (...)
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  2. Lynne Rudder Baker (2013). Updating Anselm Again. Res Philosophica 90 (1):23-32.
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  3. Einar Duenger Bohn (2012). Anselmian Theism and Indefinitely Extensible Perfection. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):671-683.
    The Anselmian Thesis is the thesis that God is that than which nothing greater can be thought. In this paper, I argue that such a notion of God is incoherent due to greatness being indefinitely extensible: roughly, for any great being that can be, there is another one that is greater, so there cannot be a being than which nothing greater can be. Someone will say that it is impossible to produce the best, because there is no perfect creature, and (...)
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  4. Hugh S. Chandler (1993). Some Ontological Arguments. Faith and Philosophy 10 (Jan):18-180.
    This was an attempt to show what is wrong with Anselm’s ‘Ontological Argument’ for the existence of God. My present view is that Peter Millican has given us a similar, but much better line of attack in his “The One Fatal Flaw….” Paper.
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  5. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2009). Gottesbeweis Oder Gedankenexperiment Christlicher Theologie? Zu Dombrowskis Verteidigung des Ontologischen Arguments. Jahrbuch für Religionsphilosophie 8:69-91.
    In this paper I argue that Daniel A. Dombrowski's defence of a version of Anselm's ontological argument fails.
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  6. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2009). Thought Experimenting with God. Revisiting the Ontological Argument. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 51 (3):249-267.
    The ontological argument is one of the most intriguing lines of reasoning in Western thought. Leaving behind debates over the proper relation between science and religion, it makes a simple move from conceptual analysis to existence in order to prove the existence of god. The ontological argument will be reviewed against the background of the contemporary debate on thought experiments. Assuming that the ontological argument fails as a philosophical proof, I will argue that its move from concept to existence might (...)
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  7. Gene Fendt (2005). The Relation of Monologion and Proslogion. Heythrop Journal 46 (2):149–166.
    This paper argues that Monologion and Proslogion though distinguishable are not really separable. They are distinct as "the way in" and "the way when one is in" but "the way in" reveals itself as a discovery of already being in; thus these ways are distinct in act, but not in being. Monologion moves from imaginary ignorance to real reverence, while Proslogion begins within reverence to achieve understanding.
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  8. Chris Heathwood (2011). The Relevance of Kant's Objection to Anselm's Ontological Argument. Religious Studies 47 (3):345 - 357.
    The most famous objection to the ontological argument is given in Kant's dictum that existence is not a real predicate. But it is not obvious how this slogan is supposed to relate to the ontological argument. Some, most notably Alvin Plantinga, have even judged Kant's dictum to be totally irrelevant to Anselm's version of the ontological argument. In this paper I argue, against Plantinga and others, that Kant's claim is indeed relevant to Anselm's argument, in the straightforward sense that if (...)
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  9. Philip Hugly & Charles Sayward (1990). Offices and God. Sophia 29:29-34.
    Pavel Tichy presents an interpretation of Anselm’s Proslogion III argument. Tichy presents an interpretation of this argument and raises doubts about one of the premises. The authors contend that Tichy’s interpretation of Anselm is wrong. The argument Tichy comes to raise doubts about is not Anselm’s.
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  10. Tomasz Jarmużek, Maciej Nowicki & Andrzej Pietruszczak (2006). An Outline of the Anselmian Theory of God. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 91 (1):317-330.
    The article presents a formalization of Anselm's so-called Ontological Arguments from Proslogion . The main idea of our research is to stay to the original text as close as is possible. We show, against some common opinions, that (i) the logic necessary for the formalization must be neither a purely sentential modal calculus, nor just non-modal first-order logic, but a modal first-order theory; (ii) such logic cannot contain logical axiom ⌜ A → ⋄ A ⌝; (iii) none of Anselm's reasonings (...)
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  11. Brian Leftow (2002). Anselm's Neglected Argument. Philosophy 77 (3):331-347.
    Anselm is commonly credited with two a priori arguments for God's existence, the non-modal argument of Proslogion 2 and a modal argument some find in Proslogion 3. But his Reply to Gaunilo contains a third. The argument as Anselm gives it has flaws, but they are not fatal, and its main premise can serve as the basis of a simpler, stronger argument.
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  12. David Lewis (1970). Anselm and Actuality. Noûs 4 (2):175-188.
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  13. T. L. Miethe (forthcoming). The Ontological Argument: A Research Bibliography. Modern Schoolman.
    Within the past two decades or so there has been a gradual renewal of interest in metaphysics in general and in the theistic arguments in particular. "the ontological argument: a research bibliography," is the most comprehensive bibliography ever done on this argument for god's existence, with over 330 items listed. the article is divided into the following categories: general histories of the argument; the argument in anselm; in the middle ages after anselm; from descartes to kant; in continental philosophy; in (...)
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  14. Thomas Morris (1987). Perfect Being Theology. Noûs 21 (1):19-30.
  15. R. Michael Perry (2009). God Versus the Multiverse: An Ontological Argument Against the Existence of a Supreme Being: With a Hopeful Alternative. In Death and Anti-Death, Volume 7: Nine Hundred Years After St. Anselm (1033-1109). Ria University Press.
    Anselm’s ontological argument for the existence of God is examined. It is concluded that Anselm errs in assuming the greatest "thing" must be a sentient being. The existence of God, then, is not established by Anselm’s argument, and is concluded to be unlikely for other reasons as well, one being that a perfected sentient being would be a logical impossibility. An afterlife and personal immortality are not precluded however; these goals could be reached by future scientific means. For now cryonics (...)
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  16. Lydia Schumacher (2011). The Lost Legacy of Anselm's Argument: Re-Thinking the Purpose of Proofs for the Existence of God. Modern Theology 27 (1):87 - 101.
    In his ?Proslogion?, Anselm presents a proof for God?s existence which has attracted a tremendous amount of scholarly attention. In spite of all that has been said about this proof and proofs for God?s existence more generally, scholarly consensus seems to dissipate when it comes to determining whether theistic proofs are persuasive and sound. In this article, I will argue that there is a way to provide compelling proof for the existence of God. To substantiate this claim, I will not (...)
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  17. Jim Stone (1989). Anselm's Proof. Philosophical Studies 57 (1):79 - 94.
  18. Eric Wilson (2010). The Ontological Argument Revisited: A Reply to Rowe. Forum Philosophicum 15 (1):37 - 44.
    Saint Anselm’s ontological argument is perhaps the most intriguing of all the traditional speculative proofs for the existence of God. Yet, his argument has been rejected outright by many philosophers. Most challenges stem from the basic conviction that no amount of logical analysis of a concept that is limited to the bounds of the "understanding" will ever be able to "reason" the existence in "reality" of any thing answering such a limited concept. However, it is not the intent of this (...)
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Descartes' Ontological Argument
  1. Jesús A. Díaz (1988). Cartesian Analyticity. Southern Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):47-55.
    The syllogism and the predicate calculus cannot account for an ontological argument in Descartes' Fifth Meditation and related texts. Descartes' notion of god relies on the analytic-synthetic distinction, which Descartes had identified before Leibniz and Kant did. I describe how the syllogism and the predicate calculus cannot explain Descartes' ontological argument; then I apply the analytic-synthetic distinction to Descartes’ idea of god.
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  2. Steven M. Duncan, Kant's Critique of the Ontological Argument: FAIL.
    In this paper, I argue that Kant's famous critique of the Ontological Argument largely begs the question against that argument, and is no better when supplemented by the modern quantificational analysis of "exists." In particular, I argue that the claim, common to Hume and Kant, that conceptual truths can never entail substantive existential claims is false,and thus no ground for rejecting the Ontological Argument.
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  3. Hector Ferreiro (2012). La interpretación hegeliana del Cogito. In Luis Lorenzo & Andrea Paul (eds.), Perspectivas de investigación en Filosofía: Aporías de la razón moderna. Ediciones de la Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento. 41-52.
    Hegel ve en la tesis del Cogito la formulación germinal de dos tesis centrales de su propio Sistema, a saber: a) la de la unidad del ser y el pensar, y b) la del carácter absoluto de la subjetividad, es decir, en otros términos, la del carácter omniabarcador de la racionalidad humana. La lectura que Hegel hace del Cogito cartesiano se ubica desde el primer momento más allá de la cuestión particular de la exactitud exegética. Hegel no pretende erigirse en (...)
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  4. T. L. Miethe (forthcoming). The Ontological Argument: A Research Bibliography. Modern Schoolman.
    Within the past two decades or so there has been a gradual renewal of interest in metaphysics in general and in the theistic arguments in particular. "the ontological argument: a research bibliography," is the most comprehensive bibliography ever done on this argument for god's existence, with over 330 items listed. the article is divided into the following categories: general histories of the argument; the argument in anselm; in the middle ages after anselm; from descartes to kant; in continental philosophy; in (...)
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  5. Lawrence Nolan & John Whipple (2006). The Dustbin Theory of Mind: A Cartesian Legacy? Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 3:33-55.
  6. Michael C. Rhodes (2006). Demonstration and Deity. Theandros 4 (2).
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Ontological Arguments for Theism, Misc
  1. Carlos Arboleda Mora (2014). Richard Kearney y la cuarta reducción fenomenológica. Escritos 22 (49):313-335.
    Uno de los fenomenólogos de la nueva generación que sigue la línea de Husserl, Heidegger, Marion y Lévinas es Richard Kearney. Este filósofo irlandés, católico, propone una cuarta reducción fenomenológica, esto es, volver al eschaton enraizado en la existencia cotidiana: encontrar la voz y el rostro de lo más alto en lo más bajo. Es como la realización de aquella idea heideggeriana de que “Sólo aquello del mundo que es de poca monta llegará alguna vez a ser cosa.” (Heidegger 159). (...)
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  2. Hugh Chandler, Augustine's Argument for the Existence of God.
    Roughly speaking, Augustine claims that ‘Immutable Truth’ is superior to the human mind and, consequently a legitimate candidate for the role of God. Clearly there is such a thing as Immutable Truth. So either that is God, or there is something superior to Immutable Truth, and that superior thing is God. I spell out this argument, and offer some objections to it.
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