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  1. Derek Allan (1990). Finding the Battle: History and the Individual in 'Les Conquérants' and 'La Condition Humaine’. Australian Journal of French Studies (2):173-181.
    Discusses the gulf between the individual and collective experience, and the way the gulf is bridged in two of Malraux's novels.
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  2. J. M. Armstrong (1998). Aristotle on the Philosophical Nature of Poetry. Classical Quarterly 48 (2):447-455.
    In Poetics chapter 9, Aristotle famously claims that poetry is more philosophical than history. What does this mean? I argue that he is talking about the metaphysics of events. Poets seek causal coherence among the events in their stories. Historians must report what happened whether or not the events of history exhibit causal coherence. This makes the poet's job more philosophical than the historian's, for the poet is seeking a unified plot -- an action-type -- that serves as the backbone (...)
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  3. Paul B. Armstrong (1986). The Multiple Existence of a Literary Work. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 44 (4):321-329.
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  4. Karl Aschenbrenner (1968). Implications of Frege's Philosophy of Language for Literature. British Journal of Aesthetics 8 (4):319-334.
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  5. Guy Bennett-Hunter (2009). Absurd Creation: An Existentialist View of Art? Philosophical Frontiers 4 (1):49-58.
    What are we to make of works of art whose apparent point is to convince us of the meaninglessness and absurdity of human existence? I examine, in this paper, the attempt of Albert Camus to provide philosophical justification of art in the face of the supposed fact of absurdity and note its failure as such with specific reference to Sartre’s criticism. Despite other superficial similarities, I contrast Camus’s concept of the absurd with that of his ‘existentialist’ colleagues, including Sartre, and (...)
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  6. Ben Blumson, Story Size.
    The shortest stories are zero words long. There is no maximum length.
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  7. Gregory Currie (1991). Work and Text. Mind 100 (3):325-340.
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  8. Xiaomang Deng (2010). The Phenomenological Ontology of Literature. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):621-630.
    Literary ontology is essentially a phenomenological issue rather than one of epistemology, sociology, or psychology. It is a theory of the phenomenological essence intuited from a sense of beauty, based on the phenomenological ontology of beauty, which puts into brackets the sociohistorical premises and material conditions of aesthetic phenomena. Beauty is the objectified emotion. This is the phenomenological definition of the essence of beauty, which manifests itself on three levels, namely emotion qua selfconsciousness, sense of beauty qua emotion, and sentiment (...)
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  9. John Dilworth (2002). The Fictionality of Plays. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (3):263–273.
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  10. Antony Easthope (1985). The Problem of Polysemy and Identity in the Literary Text. British Journal of Aesthetics 25 (4):326-339.
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  11. Jeffrey Goodman (2005). Defending Author-Essentialism. Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):200-208.
    Creationism is the view that fictional individuals such as Sherlock Holmes are contingently existing abstracta that come about due to the intentional activities of authors. Author-essentialism is the stronger thesis that the author responsible for bringing a fictional individual into existence at a time is essential to the existence of that individual. Takashi Yagisawa has recently attacked this view on the following grounds: author-essentialists rely on an ontological parallelism between fictional individuals and whole works of fiction, but this parallelism fails (...)
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  12. Jorge J. E. Gracia (2001). Borges's "Pierre Menard": Philosophy or Literature? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (1):45-57.
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  13. Nancy J. Holland (2002). Genre Fiction and "the Origin of the Work of Art". Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):216-223.
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  14. Robert Howell (2002). Ontology and the Nature of the Literary Work. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (1):67–79.
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  15. Roman Ingarden (1973). The Literary Work of Art. Evanston,Northwestern University Press.
    Though it is inter-disciplinary in scope, situated as it is on the borderlines of ontology and logic, philosophy of literature and theory of language, Ingarden's work has a deliberately narrow focus: the literary work, its structure and ...
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  16. Pedro Karczmarczyk (2007). La subjetivización de la estética y el valor cognitivo del arte según Gadamer. Analogía Filosófica: Revista de Filosofía, Investigación y Difusión (1):127-173.
    En este trabajo analizamos la reivindicación gadameriana del valor cognitivo de arte como un ejemplo de un modo de conocimiento que permite concebir de mejor manera la comprensión que tiene lugar en las ciencias del espíritu. Dicha reivindicación presupone el desconocimiento del valor cognitivo del arte operado por la subjetivización de la estética con Kant y una vuelta a los presupuestos de la tradición humanista. Por ello en la introducción presentamos en esquema los conceptos humanistas de tacto, gusto, sentido común (...)
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  17. Peter Lamarque (2002). Work and Object. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 102 (2):141–162.
    The paper considers what kinds of things are musical, literary, pictorial and sculptural works, how they relate to physical objects or abstract types, and what their identity and survival conditions are. Works are shown to be cultural objects with essential intentional and relational properties. These essential properties are connected to conditions of production and conditions of reception, of both a generic and work-specific kind. It is argued that work-identity is value-laden, whereby essential to the survival of a work is the (...)
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  18. Paisley Livingston & Andrea Sauchelli (2011). Philosophical Perspectives on Fictional Characters. New Literary History 42 (2):337-360.
    This paper takes up a series of basic philosophical questions about the nature and existence of fictional characters. We begin with realist approaches that hinge on the thesis that at least some claims about fictional characters can be right or wrong because they refer to something that exists, such as abstract objects. Irrealist approaches deny such realist postulations and hold instead that fictional characters are a figment of the human imagination. A third family of approaches, based on work by Alexius (...)
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  19. Christy Mag Uidhir (2013). Art & Art-Attempts. Oxford University Press.
    Although few philosophers agree about what it is for something to be art, most, if not all, agree that art must be in some sense intention dependent. -/- Christy Mag Uidhir argues that artworks are the products of the attempts (goal-oriented intention-directed activities) in which we engage, and these attempts not only succeed or fail but have products that reflect that success or failure. It is not just that an artwork must be the product of intentional action but rather that (...)
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  20. Christy Mag Uidhir (2013). Art, Metaphysics, & the Paradox of Standards. In , Art & Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press.
    I consider the field of aesthetics to be at its most productive and engaging when adopting a broadly philosophically informative approach to its core issues (e.g., shaping and testing putative art theoretic commitments against the relevant standard models employed in philosophy of language, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind) and to be at its most impotent and bewildering when cultivating a philosophically insular character (e.g., selecting interpretative, ontological, or conceptual models solely for fit with pre-fixed art theoretic commitments). For example, when (...)
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  21. Jeff Mitscherling (1985). Roman Ingarden's "the Literary Work of Art": Exposition and Analyses. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 45 (3):351-381.
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  22. Anna Mudde (2013). Beauvoir's Metaphysical Novel: Literature, Philosophy, and Ambiguity. In Ann Ward (ed.), Socrates and Dionysus: Philosophy and Art in Dialogue. Cambridge Scholars Press.
    In this essay, I explore the ways that Beauvoir’s description of philosophical novels reveals her understanding of consciousness as a particular sort of ambiguity: that which not only gives the world meaning, but which also, necessarily, finds meaning in the world through the values, ideas, and objects given to it by others. It is through the philosophical (metaphysical) novel that Beauvoir finds a medium for the philosophical communication of ambiguity – that is, a medium for writing human being. More specifically, (...)
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  23. Stein Haugom Olsen (1976). Defining a Literary Work. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (2):133-142.
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  24. B. Smith & A. Cevolini (1999). Deferenza testuale. Divus Thomas 102 (3):92-116.
    Works of philosophy written in English have spawned a massive secondary literature dealing with ideas, problems or arguments. But they have almost never given rise to works of ‘commentary’ in the strict sense, a genre which is however a dominant literary form not only in the Confucian, Vedantic, Islamic, Jewish and Scholastic traditions, but also in relation to more recent German-language philosophy. Yet Anglo-Saxon philosophers have themselves embraced the commentary form when dealing with Greek or Latin philosophers outside their own (...)
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  25. Barry Smith (1979). Roman Ingarden: Ontological Foundations for Literary Theory. In John Odmark (ed.), Language, Literature and Meaning I: Problems of Literary Theory. Benjamins. 373-390.
    The paper seeks to apply the work of the Polish phenomenologist Roman Ingarden to certain problems in literary theory; contrasts the notions of ontological and epistemological incompleteness of the represented objects of a literary work and considers the question of the nature of such objects. The paper concludes by analyzing some of the degrees of freedom possessed by the readings of literary work in relation to the work itself.
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  26. Jon Stewart (1995). Borges on Language and Translation. Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):320-329.
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  27. B. R. Tilghman (1982). Danto and the Ontology of Literature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 40 (3):293-299.
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  28. S. J. Wilsmore (1987). The Role of Titles in Identifying Literary Works. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (4):403-408.
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