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  1. Avshalom M. Adam & Dalia Rachman-moore (2004). The Methods Used to Implement an Ethical Code of Conduct and Employee Attitudes. Journal of Business Ethics 54 (3):225 - 244.
    In the process of implementing an ethical code of conduct, a business organization uses formal methods. Of these, training, courses and means of enforcement are common and are also suitable for self-regulation. The USA is encouraging business corporations to self regulate with the Federal Sentencing Guidelines (FSG). The Guidelines prescribe similar formal methods and specify that, unless such methods are used, the process of implementation will be considered ineffective, and the business will therefore not be considered to have complied with (...)
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  2. C. Fred Alford (2007). Whistle-Blower Narratives: The Experience of Choiceless Choice. Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (1):223-248.
    Most whistleblowers talk as if they never had a choice about whether to blow the whistle. This doesn't mean they acted suddenly, or impulsively, only that they believe they could not have done otherwise. Trying to make sense of this near universal answer to the question "Why did you do it?" the essay draws on narrative theory. Narrative theory distinguishes between actant and sender—that is, between actor and his or her values. This distinction helps to explain what it means to (...)
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  3. Arthur W. Apter & James Cummings (2002). Blowing Up the Power Set of the Least Measurable. Journal of Symbolic Logic 67 (3):915-923.
    We prove some results related to the problem of blowing up the power set of the least measurable cardinal. Our forcing results improve those of [1] by using the optimal hypothesis.
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  4. David Ardagh (2011). A Quasi-Personal Alternative to Some Anglo-American Pluralist Models of Organisations. Philosophy of Management 10 (3):41-58.
    An organisation which operates without a ‘self-concept’ of its goals, authorised roles, governance procedures regarding sharing information, decisional powers and procedures, and distribution of benefits, or without continuous audit of its impact on its end-users, other players in the practice, and the state, does so at some ethical risk.This paper argues that a quasi-personal model of the collective ethical agency of organisations and states is helpful in suggesting some of these key areas which are liable to need careful organisational design (...)
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  5. James E. Austin (2010). From Organization to Organization: On Creating Value. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):13 - 15.
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  6. Susan Ayers & Steven E. Kaplan (2005). Wrongdoing by Consultants: An Examination of Employees' Reporting Intentions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 57 (2):121 - 137.
    Organizations are increasingly embedded with consultants and other non-employees who have the opportunity to engage in wrongdoing. However, research exploring the reporting intentions of employees regarding the discovery of wrongdoing by consultants is scant. It is important to examine reporting intentions in this setting given the enhanced presence of consultants in organizations and the fact that wrongdoing by consultants changes a key characteristic of the wrongdoing. Using an experimental approach, the current paper reports the results of a study examining employees (...)
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  7. Marcello Barbieri (2002). Organic Codes. Sign Systems Studies 30 (2):743-753.
    Coding characteristics have been discovered not only in protein synthesis, but also in various other natural processes, thus showing that the genetic code is not an isolated case in the organic world. Other examples are the sequence codes, the adhesion code, the signal transduction codes, the splicing codes, the sugar code, the histone code, and probably more. These discoveries however have not had a significant impact because of the widespread belief that organic codes are not real but metaphorical entities. They (...)
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  8. Catherine Baroin (2013). Genre et codes vestimentaires à Rome. Clio 2:43-66.
    Si les textes juridiques et les usages de la Rome républicaine et impériale établissent un classement entre les vêtements selon le statut (libre/non libre), le sexe et l’âge, certains vêtements apparaissent comme unisexes et, surtout, ce sont la façon de les porter (habitus), les gestes (gestus) et la démarche (incessus) qui leur donnent les connotations masculines ou féminines. Le sens du vêtement est construit par un système d’oppositions (toga pura VS toga praetexta ; toga VS stola, etc.) qui ne fonctionnent (...)
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  9. Gérard Battail (2014). Barbieri’s Organic Codes Enable Error Correction of Genomes. Biosemiotics 7 (2):259-277.
    Barbieri introduced and developed the concept of organic codes. The most basic of them is the genetic code, a set of correspondence rules between otherwise unrelated sequences: strings of nucleotides on the one hand, polypeptidic chains on the other hand. Barbieri noticed that it implies ‘coding by convention’ as arbitrary as the semantic relations a language establishes between words and outer objects. Moreover, the major transitions in life evolution originated in new organic codes similarly involving conventional rules. Independently, dealing with (...)
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  10. Denis Beauchamp (1998). The Canadian Defense Ethics Program and the “Corporate Model”. Business and Society Review 100 (1):71-74.
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  11. Jack N. Behrman (2001). Adequacy of International Codes of Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (1):51 - 64.
    International codes of corporate behavior have been proposed, discussed, negotiated, and promulgated by governments, transnational corporations, and inter-corporate associations over the past few decades. It is not clear that they have been resoundingly as successful in changing corporate behavior – particularly as to corruption and environmental protection – as have national government requirements imposed on foreign enterprises and their own officials. This article arrays the many attempts to structure cooperative action to re-order corporate behavior on several dimensions – restrictive business (...)
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  12. James A. Benson & David L. Ross (1998). Sundstrand: A Case Study in Transformation of Cultural Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (14):1517 - 1527.
    This analysis examines whistleblowing within the context of organizational culture. Several factors which have provided impetus for organizations to emphasize ethical conduct and to encourage internal, rather than external, whistleblowing are identified. Inadequate protection for whistleblowers and statutory enticement for them to report ethical violations externally are discussed. Sundstrand's successful model for cultural change and encouragement of internal whistleblowing is analyzed to show how their model of demonstrating management's commitment to ethical conduct, establishing ethical expectations of employees, training to ensure (...)
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  13. Mark S. Blodgett (2011). Substantive Ethics: Integrating Law and Ethics in Corporate Ethics Programs. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):39-48.
    Continual corporate malfeasance signals the need for obeying the law and for enhancing business ethics perspectives. Yet, the relationship between law and ethics and its integrative role in defining values are often unclear. While integrity-based ethics programs emphasize ethics values more than law or compliance, viewing ethics as being integrated with law may enhance understanding of an organization’s core values. The author refers to this integration of law and ethics as “substantive ethics,” analogous to the substantive law that evolves over (...)
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  14. Janet L. Borgerson, Jonathan E. Schroeder, Martin Escudero Magnusson & Frank Magnusson (2009). Corporate Communication, Ethics, and Operational Identity: A Case Study of Benetton. Business Ethics: A European Review 18 (3):209-223.
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  15. Albert Borgmann (2011). Intelligence and the Limits of Codes. In Thomas Bartscherer (ed.), Switching Codes. Chicago University Press. 184.
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  16. Valérie Boussard (ed.) (2005). Au Nom de la Norme: Les Dispositifs de Gestion Entre Normes Organisationnelles Et Normes Professionnelles. Harmattan.
    Et derrière cette dernière se dessine le rôle des managers, premiers acteurs de ces dynamiques de changement, pour avoir intériorisé les principes de la rationalisation. Premiers acteurs ? Seuls acteurs ?
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  17. Peter Bowden (2010). STOPPING CORPORATE WRONGS. Australian Journal Professional and Applied Ethics 12 (1&2):55-69.
    The corporate meltdowns of this and the previous decade in the US - WorldCom, Enron, Tyco, and in Australia - FAI, HIH and AWB being among the many examples - have resulted in the governments of those two countries introducing legislation and policy guidelines aimed at minimising future corporate misbehaviour. -/- The US has introduced the Sarbanes Oxley Act, with requirements on corporate accountants and auditors, as well as its whistleblowing provisions. It has revised the Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations. (...)
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  18. Peter Bowden (2006). An Analysis of Whistleblower Protections. Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 8 (2).
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  19. John A. Brierley & Christopher J. Cowton (2000). Putting Meta-Analysis to Work: Accountants' Organizational-Professional Conflict. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 24 (4):343 - 353.
    Commentators on empirical research in business ethics have recommended that use should be made of meta-analysis – the quantitative analysis of a group of research studies. This paper elaborates upon those recommendations by conducting, as a "case study" for further reflection, a meta-analysis of studies of accountants' organizational-professional conflict (OPC) previously published in accounting and psychology journals. Of five variables capable of analysis, only the population correlation coefficient between OPC and organizational tenure is identified. It was not possible to find (...)
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  20. L. J. Brooks (1989). Corporate Ethical Performance: Trends, Forecasts and Outlooks. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (1):31 - 38.
    Executives, professionals, educators and labour leaders are requesting an update on corporate ethical trends. This article presents an examination of why the interest in corporate ethics is growing both in society and in corporations. An analysis follows of how corporations are responding to this interest, and of how that response might be enhanced through improved second-generation codes of ethical performance.
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  21. Leonard J. Brooks (1989). Corporate Codes of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 8 (2-3):117 - 129.
    The majority of North American corporations awakened to the need for their own ethical guidelines during the late 1970s and early 1980s, even though modern corporations are subject to a surprising multiplicity of external codes of ethics or conduct. This paper provides an understanding of both internal and external codes through a discussion of the factors behind the development of the codes, an analysis of internal codes and an identification of problems with them.
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  22. Cam Caldwell (2011). Duties Owed to Organizational Citizens – Ethical Insights for Today's Leader. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):343-356.
    Organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) has been widely recognized as a contributor to improving organizational performance and wealth creation. The purpose of this article is to briefly summarize the motives of many employees who exercise OCB and to identify the ethical duties owed by organizational leaders to the highly committed employees with whom they work. After reviewing the nature of OCB and the psychological contracts made with highly committed employees, we then use Hosmer’s framework of ten ethical perspectives to identify how (...)
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  23. Cam Caldwell, Larry A. Floyd, Ryan Atkins & Russell Holzgrefe (2012). Ethical Duties of Organizational Citizens: Obligations Owed by Highly Committed Employees. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):285-299.
    Individuals who demonstrate organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) contribute to their organization’s ability to create wealth, but they also owe their organizations a complex set of ethical duties. Although, the academic literature has begun to address the ethical duties owed by organizational leaders to organizational citizens, very little has been written about the duties owed by those who practice OCB to their organizations. In this article, we identify an array of ethical duties owed by those who engage in extra-role behavior and (...)
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  24. Emily F. Carasco & Jang B. Singh (2003). The Content and Focus of the Codes of Ethics of the World's Largest Transnational Corporations. Business and Society Review 108 (1):71-94.
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  25. Aged Care (2003). Codes and Declarations. Nursing Ethics 10 (1):205-209.
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  26. Archie B. Carroll (1998). We Hold the Key to Corporate Success. Business and Society 37 (1):66-67.
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  27. Wendy R. Carroll, Margaret C. McKee, Cathy Driscoll & Terry H. Wagar (2011). Examining the Business Ethics Training and Development Practices of Canadian Organizations. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:4-12.
    Ethics training has been highlighted as essential for building and fostering business ethics in organizations. National and international trends show that over 40% of businesses have some form of business ethics training. We use data collected from 199 firms to examine the presence of ethics training in top Canadian companies and found that the presence varied by region and firm size, and that the Canadian average (35%) lags other countries.
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  28. A. Scott Carson (2008). Codes of Ethics. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:43-54.
    This paper presents a philosophical critique of intuitionism and other current theories of rationality that underlie and, in some cases, question the cogency of codes of ethics. A classical theory of rationality is defended and a concept of ‘reasonableness’ is developed as an ideal-type in setting out the principles for an effective ethical education that can form the basis for implementing a code of conduct.
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  29. Cathy Cassell, Phil Johnson & Ken Smith (1997). Opening the Black Box: Corporate Codes of Ethics in Their Organizational Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (10):1077-1093.
    A review of the literature on Corporate Codes of Ethics suggests that whilst there exists an informative body of literature concerning the prevalence of such codes, their design, implementation and promulgation, it is also evident that there is a relative lack of consideration of their impact upon members' everyday organizational behaviour. By drawing upon organizational sociology and psychology this paper constructs a contextualist and interpretive model which seeks to enable an analysis and evaluation of their effects upon individual, group and (...)
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  30. Barry Castro (1995). Business Ethics: Some Observations on the Relationship Between Training, Affiliation, and Disciplinary Drift. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (9):781 - 786.
    This paper undertakes an inquiry into the relationship between the disciplinary training of business ethicists, their institutional affiliations, those whose work they cite, those with whom they collaborate, and — to some degree — the kind of work they do. It is intended as a response to both the historic injunction that we examine ourselves and to what is seen as the considerable disarray of the field.
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  31. Lewis Long-fung Chau & Wai-sum Siu (2000). Ethical Decision-Making in Corporate Entrepreneurial Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 23 (4):365 - 375.
    No research thus far has attempted to examine ethical decision- making in corporate entrepreneurial organizations. Results of such study would provide management executives with insights on what action, if any, is essential for achieving business ethics and corporate entrepreneurship simultaneously. This paper argues, theoretically, that the work characteristics, organizational characteristics, and some individual characteristics in a corporate entrepreneurial organization are conducive to ethical decisions. These characteristics help mitigate the adverse impact of the turbulent environments on ethical decision- making behavior. Based (...)
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  32. Al Y. S. Chen, Roby B. Sawyers & Paul F. Williams (1997). Reinforcing Ethical Decision Making Through Corporate Culture. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (8):855-865.
    Behaving ethically depends on the ability to recognize that ethical issues exist, to see from an ethical point of view. This ability to see and respond ethically may be related more to attributes of corporate culture than to attributes of individual employees. Efforts to increase ethical standards and decrease pressure to behave unethically should therefore concentrate on the organization and its culture. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how total quality (TQ) techniques can facilitate the development of a (...)
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  33. Ching‐Pu Chen & Chih‐Tsung Lai (2014). To Blow or Not to Blow the Whistle: The Effects of Potential Harm, Social Pressure and Organisational Commitment on Whistleblowing Intention and Behaviour. Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (3):327-342.
    This study uses a rational ethical decision-making framework to examine the influence of moral intensity (potential harm and social pressure) on whistleblowing intention and behaviour using organisational commitment as a moderator. A scenario was developed, and an online questionnaire was used to conduct an empirical analysis on the responses of 533 participants. The mean age and years of work experience of the respondents were 31 and 8.2 years, respectively. The results show, first, that while moral intensity is correlated with whistleblowing (...)
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  34. Theodore T. Y. Chen (2001). Ethics Control Mechanisms: A Comparative Observation of Hong Kong Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (4):391 - 400.
    Managers with different cultural backgrounds and under different circumstances have different views on what is acceptable ethical behaviour. This study attempts to determine whether major companies in Hong Kong share the same views as North American academics on what management ethical standards ought to be, and if so, whether any control mechanisms have been established to instill ethical behaviour within their organizations. Notable differences between the practice in these companies and those from a similar survey conducted in North America are (...)
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  35. Ali Iftikhar Choudhary, Syed Azeem Akhtar & Arshad Zaheer (2013). Impact of Transformational and Servant Leadership on Organizational Performance: A Comparative Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):433-440.
    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of two comparative leadership styles on organizational performance outcomes. The leadership styles undertaken is transformational and servant leadership. A sample of 155 participants is taken from profit-oriented service sector of Pakistan. Data through survey gathered on a five point likert scale from organizations. AMOS and SPSS are used for statistical analysis. The result shows that, transformational leadership has more impact on organizational learning than servant leadership. Furthermore organizational learning enhances organizational (...)
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  36. Frances Chua & Asheq Rahman (2011). Institutional Pressures and Ethical Reckoning by Business Corporations. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (2):307 - 329.
    Prior studies have provided explanations for the presence, use and dissemination of codes of corporate ethics or codes of corporate conduct of business corporations. Most such explanations are functional in nature, and are descriptive as they are derived from the codes and their associated documents. We search for more underlying explanations using two complementary theories: first, social contract theories explaining the exogenous and endogenous reasons of organizational behavior, and then institutional theory explaining why organizations take similar measures in response to (...)
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  37. Stephen Cohen (2013). Promoting Ethical Judgment in an Organisational Context. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):513-523.
    The essay argues that individual ethical judgment is a necessary ingredient in an organisation’s ethical performance. Attempts to systematise judgment, removing it from individual responsibility are not successful, and sometimes can even be counterproductive. Focus on systems of accountability can actually detract from the production of ethical behaviour. A number of examples are provided. Although it is much more difficult to produce, individual responsible decision-making and individual judgment should be the features that an organisation focuses on in its interest to (...)
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  38. D. A. L. Coldwell, T. Joosub & E. Papageorgiou (2012). Responsible Leadership in Organizational Crises: An Analysis of the Effects of Public Perceptions of Selected SA Business Organizations' Reputations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):133-144.
    ‘The loss of a stable state’ (Schon 1973 ) in organizational transformation can both be regarded as lamentable and inevitable. Transformation causes disruption and invasions of comfort zones to those affected by it, but it is nevertheless inevitable. The article maintains that while the loss of a stable state is inevitable in the stream of change confronting organizations today, points of stability and methods of dealing with instability are attainable through responsible management. The article postulates that steps taken by responsible (...)
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  39. Nina Corazzo (2010). Cracking the Codes. Semiotics:271-280.
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  40. S. J. Cowley (2008). The Codes Oflanguage: Turtles All the Way Up. Biosemiotics 1 (part 4):319-345.
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  41. Christopher J. Cowton & Not Me (2000). Do Codes Make a Difference? The Case of Bank Lending and the Environment. Journal of Business Ethics 24 (2):165 - 178.
    Codes of conduct are a conspicuous feature of modern business organization, but doubts have been raised regarding their efficacy in ensuring high standards of behavior. Although some of the issues involved have been discussed at some length in the business ethics literature, the amount of systematic empirical evidence on the impact of codes is very limited. This paper seeks to make a contribution to that body of knowledge by studying the policies and procedures of a sample of banks which have (...)
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  42. Christopher J. Cowton & Paul Thompson (2000). Do Codes Make a Difference? The Case of Bank Lending and the Environment. Journal of Business Ethics 24 (2):165 - 178.
    Codes of conduct are a conspicuous feature of modern business organization, but doubts have been raised regarding their efficacy in ensuring high standards of behavior. Although some of the issues involved have been discussed at some length in the business ethics literature, the amount of systematic empirical evidence on the impact of codes is very limited. This paper seeks to make a contribution to that body of knowledge by studying the policies and procedures of a sample of banks which have (...)
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  43. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  44. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  45. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  46. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  47. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  48. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  49. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  50. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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