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  1. Robert S. Adler & William J. Bigoness (1992). Contemporary Ethical Issues in Labor-Management Relations. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (5-6):351-360.
    Numerous labor-management issues possess ethical dimensions and pose ethical questions. In this article, the authors discuss four labor-management issues that present important contemporary problems: union organizing, labor-management negotiations, employee involvement programs, and union obligations of fair representation. In the authors view, labor and management too often view their ethical obligations as beginning and ending at the law''s boundaries. Contemporary business realities suggest that cooperative and enlightened modes of interaction between labor and management seem appropriate.
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  2. Alexander Gabovich & Vladimir Kuznetsov (2011). Is the Personal-Member Institution of the Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences Justified in the Light of Scientometric Indicators? Sociology of Science and Technology 2 (2):47-68.
    Existence of state-supported academies of science is a distinctive feature of the fundamental-science organization in Ukraine. Their research staff is divided into two groups: (i) personal members (academicians and corresponding members) and the rest of the researchers. First-group members have numerous economic and status privileges. It is officially purported that personal members are scientifically qualified than their colleagues. We analyzed this hypothesis on the basis of international indicators of the scientifi c activity (numbers of publications in the international peer-reviewed journals (...)
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  3. Chieh-Peng Lin, Yuan-Hui Tsai, Sheng-Wuu Joe & Chou-Kang Chiu (2012). Modeling the Relationship Among Perceived Corporate Citizenship, Firms' Attractiveness, and Career Success Expectation. Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):83-93.
    Drawing on propositions from the signaling theory and expectancy theory, this study hypothesizes that the perceived corporate citizenship of job seekers positively affects a firm’s attractiveness and career success expectation. This study’s proposed research hypotheses are empirically tested using a survey of graduating MBA students seeking a job. The empirical findings show that a firm’s corporate citizenship provides a competitive advantage in attracting job seekers and fostering optimistic career success expectation. Such findings substantially complement the growing literature arguing that corporate (...)
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  4. Domenic Marbaniang (forthcoming). Roots of Corruption: A Christian Philosophical Examination. In Paul Cho (ed.), CMS Papers. Union Biblical Seminary.
    At the root of the corruption problem is its moral and economic nature. The economic problem is a moral problem. Modern theories of corruption are usually empirical in nature. However, they are not without their ideological dimensions though in the modern scheme of things, a normative framework is usually not rationally entertained. Empiricism combined with materialism takes on the reins of economies; however, disregard of the spiritual will not bring any lasting solution. A vision of the absolute is needed. There (...)
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  5. James Rocha (2011). Autonomy Within Subservient Careers. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (3):313-328.
    While there is much literature on autonomy and the conditions for its attainment, there is less on how those conditions reflect on agents’ ordinary careers. Most people’s careers involve a great deal of subservient activity that would prevent the kind of control over agents’ actions that autonomy would seem to require. Yet, it would seem strange to deny autonomy to every agent who regularly follows orders at work—to do so would make autonomy a futile ideal. Most contemporary autonomy accounts provide (...)
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  6. Peter Waring & John Lewer (2004). The Impact of Socially Responsible Investment on Human Resource Management: A Conceptual Framework. Journal of Business Ethics 52 (1):99-108.
    Socially responsible investment (SRI) has increasingly assumed a major role in global equity markets. In this article we argue that the continued growth in investors seeking to align their ethical concerns with their investment strategies may influence the way in which the employment relationship is managed in publicly-listed corporations. After tracing the historical development of SRI, its implications for the conduct of human resource management (HRM) are examined. We conclude by analysing a number of the key problems associated with investor (...)
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  7. Garrath Williams (2006). 'Infrastructures of Responsibility': The Moral Tasks of Institutions. Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (2):207–221.
    The members of any functioning modern society live their lives amid complex networks of overlapping institutions. Apart from the major political institutions of law and government, however, much normative political theory seems to regard this institutional fabric as largely a pragmatic convenience. This paper contests this assumption by reflecting on how institutions both constrain and enable spheres of effective action and responsibility. In this way a society’s institutional fabric constitutes, in Samuel Scheffler’s phrase, an infrastructure of responsibility. The paper discusses (...)
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