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  1. David Ardagh (2011). A Quasi-Personal Alternative to Some Anglo-American Pluralist Models of Organisations. Philosophy of Management 10 (3):41-58.
    An organisation which operates without a ‘self-concept’ of its goals, authorised roles, governance procedures regarding sharing information, decisional powers and procedures, and distribution of benefits, or without continuous audit of its impact on its end-users, other players in the practice, and the state, does so at some ethical risk.This paper argues that a quasi-personal model of the collective ethical agency of organisations and states is helpful in suggesting some of these key areas which are liable to need careful organisational design (...)
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  2. Cam Caldwell (2011). Duties Owed to Organizational Citizens – Ethical Insights for Today's Leader. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):343-356.
    Organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) has been widely recognized as a contributor to improving organizational performance and wealth creation. The purpose of this article is to briefly summarize the motives of many employees who exercise OCB and to identify the ethical duties owed by organizational leaders to the highly committed employees with whom they work. After reviewing the nature of OCB and the psychological contracts made with highly committed employees, we then use Hosmer’s framework of ten ethical perspectives to identify how (...)
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  3. Cam Caldwell, Larry A. Floyd, Ryan Atkins & Russell Holzgrefe (2012). Ethical Duties of Organizational Citizens: Obligations Owed by Highly Committed Employees. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):285-299.
    Individuals who demonstrate organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) contribute to their organization’s ability to create wealth, but they also owe their organizations a complex set of ethical duties. Although, the academic literature has begun to address the ethical duties owed by organizational leaders to organizational citizens, very little has been written about the duties owed by those who practice OCB to their organizations. In this article, we identify an array of ethical duties owed by those who engage in extra-role behavior and (...)
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  4. Ali Iftikhar Choudhary, Syed Azeem Akhtar & Arshad Zaheer (2013). Impact of Transformational and Servant Leadership on Organizational Performance: A Comparative Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):433-440.
    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of two comparative leadership styles on organizational performance outcomes. The leadership styles undertaken is transformational and servant leadership. A sample of 155 participants is taken from profit-oriented service sector of Pakistan. Data through survey gathered on a five point likert scale from organizations. AMOS and SPSS are used for statistical analysis. The result shows that, transformational leadership has more impact on organizational learning than servant leadership. Furthermore organizational learning enhances organizational (...)
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  5. Stephen Cohen (2013). Promoting Ethical Judgment in an Organisational Context. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):513-523.
    The essay argues that individual ethical judgment is a necessary ingredient in an organisation’s ethical performance. Attempts to systematise judgment, removing it from individual responsibility are not successful, and sometimes can even be counterproductive. Focus on systems of accountability can actually detract from the production of ethical behaviour. A number of examples are provided. Although it is much more difficult to produce, individual responsible decision-making and individual judgment should be the features that an organisation focuses on in its interest to (...)
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  6. D. A. L. Coldwell, T. Joosub & E. Papageorgiou (2012). Responsible Leadership in Organizational Crises: An Analysis of the Effects of Public Perceptions of Selected SA Business Organizations' Reputations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):133-144.
    ‘The loss of a stable state’ (Schon 1973 ) in organizational transformation can both be regarded as lamentable and inevitable. Transformation causes disruption and invasions of comfort zones to those affected by it, but it is nevertheless inevitable. The article maintains that while the loss of a stable state is inevitable in the stream of change confronting organizations today, points of stability and methods of dealing with instability are attainable through responsible management. The article postulates that steps taken by responsible (...)
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  7. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  8. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  9. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  10. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  11. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  12. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  13. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  14. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  15. Kim Economides & Majella O'Leary (2007). Moral of the Story: Toward an Understanding of Ethics in Organisations and Legal Practice, The. Legal Ethics 10:5.
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  16. Russell Eisenman (2012). Organizational Distortion. Journal of Information Ethics 21 (1):9-11.
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  17. Peter A. French, Jeffrey Nesteruk & David T. Risser (1992). Corporations in the Moral Community. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich College Publishers.
  18. María Teresa Gastón (2012). Meatpacking Workers' Perceptions of Working Conditions, Psychological Contracts and Organizational Justice. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 9 (1):91-115.
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  19. J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  20. Richard Walsh-Bowers, Amy Rossiter & Isaac Prilleltensky (1996). The Personal is the Organizational in the Ethics of Hospital Social Workers. Ethics and Behavior 6 (4):321 – 335.
    Understanding the social context of clinical ethics is vital for making ethical discourse central in professional practice and for preventing harm. In this paper we present findings about clinical ethics from in depth interviews and consultation with 7 members of a hospital social work department. Workers gave different accounts of ethical dilemmas and resources for ethical decision making than did their managers, whereas workers and managers agreed on core-guiding ethical principles and on ideal situations for ethical discourse. We discuss the (...)
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Corporate Ethical Climate
  1. Howard Adelman (1991). Morality and Ethics in Organizational Administration. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (9):665 - 678.
    The article is a detailed case study of theft and fraud by an employee in an organization. The analysis suggests that in the process of dealing with the employee, the issue was notprimarily one of ethics, but of two moral principles in conflict, compassion and concern for a fellow human being and the morality governing responses to betrayal. The latter governed the results because that morality was congruent with the predominant ethics of the organization concerned with preserving the authority structure (...)
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  2. Alexandre Ardichvili, Douglas Jondle, Brenda Kowske, Edgard Cornachione, Jessica Li & Thomas Thakadipuram (2012). Ethical Cultures in Large Business Organizations in Brazil, Russia, India, and China. Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):415-428.
    This study focuses on comparison of perceptions of ethical business cultures in large business organizations from four largest emerging economies, commonly referred to as the BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India, and China), and from the US. The data were collected from more than 13,000 managers and employees of business organizations in five countries. The study found significant differences among BRIC countries, with respondents from India and Brazil providing more favorable assessments of ethical cultures of their organizations than respondents from China and (...)
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  3. Janet L. Borgerson, Jonathan E. Schroeder, Martin Escudero Magnusson & Frank Magnusson (2009). Corporate Communication, Ethics, and Operational Identity: A Case Study of Benetton. Business Ethics 18 (3):209-223.
    This article investigates conceptual and strategic relationships between corporate identity, organizational identity and ethics, utilizing the Benetton Corporation as an illustrative case study. Although much attention has been given to visual aspects of Benetton's renowned ethical brand building efforts, few studies have looked at how Benetton's employees, retail environments and trade events express ethical aspects of their well-known corporate identity. A multi-method case study, including interviews at retail outlets and trade events, sheds light on several important yet under-studied components of (...)
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  4. Aat Brakel (2007). The Moral Standard of a Company: Performing the Norms of Corporate Codes. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 3 (1):95-103.
    Bottom lines and codes provide a corporation with guidelines for dealing with the inside and outside world. Bottom lines have the oldest papers through Frederic Taylor's Scientific Management, dated beginning 20th century. Codes came into existence in its midst with the emerging sustainability agenda, referring both to technical detail and human judgement. Corporate codes present themselves as a policy document with collective rules handed down by way of a top-down approach. Since an effective code is dependent on the motivation of (...)
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  5. Chin-Yi Chen & Chin-Fang Yang (2012). The Impact of Spiritual Leadership on Organizational Citizenship Behavior: A Multi-Sample Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):107-114.
    This study investigates and compares the impact of spiritual leadership on organizational citizenship behavior in finance and retail service industries to determine the possibility of generalizing and applying spiritual leadership to other industries. This study used multi-sample analysis of structural equation modeling. The results show that values, attitudes, and behaviors of leaders have positive effects on meaning/calling and membership of the employees, and further facilitate employees to perform excellent organizational citizenship behaviors, including the altruism of assisting colleagues and the responsible (...)
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  6. Lynn D. Devenport, Ryan P. Brown, Stephen T. Murphy, Alison L. Antes, Ethan P. Waples, Michael D. Mumford & Shane Connelly (2009). Exposure to Unethical Career Events: Effects on Decision Making, Climate, and Socialization. Ethics and Behavior 19 (5):351-378.
    An implicit goal of many interventions intended to enhance integrity is to minimize peoples' exposure to unethical events. The intent of the present effort was to examine if exposure to unethical practices in the course of one's work is related to ethical decision making. Accordingly, 248 doctoral students in the biological, health, and social sciences were asked to complete a field appropriate measure of ethical decision making. In addition, they were asked to complete measures examining the perceived acceptability of unethical (...)
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  7. Emmanuel A. Erondu, Alex Sharland & John O. Okpara (2004). Corporate Ethics in Nigeria: A Test of the Concept of an Ethical Climate. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 51 (4):349-357.
    Behaving in an ethical manner is part of the social responsibility of a business. How employees perceive the business operates often drives how they will treat customers. If employees think their organization is ethical they are more likely to behave in an ethical manner themselves. The study focuses on the ethics of banking organizations in Nigeria using a multidimensional framework developed from prior research. The data were analyzed to test the robustness of the dimensions and evaluate whether the framework (...)
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  8. David J. Fritzsche (2000). Ethical Climates and the Ethical Dimension of Decision Making. Journal of Business Ethics 24 (2):125 - 140.
    Victor and Cullen (1987, 1988) developed a typology of ethical climates based upon the level of moral development of the work group (egoism, benevolence and principled a la Kohlberg, 1981) and the locus of analysis utilized in reaching decisions (individual, local, cosmopolitan). Building on this typology, data were obtained from a high technology company for the purpose of empirically extending the examination of the number of ethical climates that exist and portraying the relationship between ethical climates and the ethical dimension (...)
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  9. Weihui Fu & Satish P. Deshpande (2012). Factors Impacting Ethical Behavior in a Chinese State-Owned Steel Company. Journal of Business Ethics 105 (2):231-237.
    This study examines factors impacting ethical behavior of 208 employees of a Chinese state-owned steel company. Only rules climate had a significant impact on ethical behavior of respondents. Other ethical climate types such as professional, caring, instrumental, independence, and efficiency did not impact ethical behavior of respondents. Ethical behavior of peers, ethical behavior of successful managers, and overclaiming had a significant impact on ethical behavior of subjects.
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  10. Sean T. Hannah, Bruce J. Avolio & Fred O. Walumbwa (2011). Relationships Between Authentic Leadership, Moral Courage, and Ethical and Pro-Social Behaviors. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):555-578.
    Organizations constitute morally-complex environments, requiring organization members to possess levels of moral courage sufficient to promote their ethical action, while refraining from unethical actions when faced with temptations or pressures. Using a sample drawn from a military context, we explored the antecedents and consequences of moral courage. Results from this four-month field study demonstrated that authentic leadership was positively related to followers’ displays of moral courage. Further, followers’ moral courage fully mediated the effects of authentic leadership on followers’ ethical and (...)
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  11. Jean L. Johnson, Kelly D. Martin & Amit Saini (2011). Strategic Culture and Environmental Dimensions as Determinants of Anomie in Publicly-Traded and Privately-Held Firms. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (3):473-502.
    Anomie is a condition in which normative guidelines for governing conduct are absent. Using survey data from a sample of U.S. manufacturing firms, we explore the impact of internal (cultural) and external (environmental) determinants of organizational anomie. We suggest that four internal organizational factors can generate or suppress organizational anomie, including strategic aggressiveness, long-term orientation, competitor orientation, and strategic flexibility. Similarly, we argue that external contextual factors, including competitive intensity and technological turbulence, can influence organizational anomie. We extend anomie and (...)
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  12. Muel Kaptein & Jan Van Dalen (2000). The Empirical Assessment of Corporate Ethics: A Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 24 (2):95 - 114.
    Empirical analyses of the ethics of corporations with the aim to improve the state of corporate ethics are rare. This paper develops an integrated, normative model of corporate ethics by conceptualizing the ethical quality of organizations and by relating this contextual quality to various expressions of immoral behavior. This so-called Ethics Qualities Model for organizations, which contains 21 ethical qualities, allows one to assess the ethical content of institutional groups of individuals. A proper conceptualization is highly relevant both for the (...)
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  13. Kathryn Pavlovich & Keiko Krahnke (2012). Empathy, Connectedness and Organisation. Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):131-137.
    In this paper, we conceptually explore the role of empathy as a connectedness organising mechanism. We expand ideas underlying positive organisational scholarship and examine leading-edge studies from neuroscience and quantum physics that give support to our claims. The perspective we propose has profound implications regarding how we organise and how we manage. First, we argue that empathy enhances connectedness through the unconscious sharing of neuro-pathways that dissolves the barriers between self and other. This sharing encourages the integration of affective and (...)
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  14. Masoud Shadnam & Thomas B. Lawrence (2011). Understanding Widespread Misconduct in Organizations. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (3):379-407.
    Reports of widespread misconduct in organizations have become sadly commonplace. Sexual abuse in the Catholic Church, accounting fraud in large corporations, and physical and sexual harassment in the military implicate not only the individuals involved, but the organizations and fields in which they happened. In this paper we describe such situations as instances of “moral collapse” and develop a multi-level theory of moral collapse that draws on institutional theory as its central orienting lens. We draw on institutional theory because of (...)
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  15. Devora Shapiro & Marilea Bramer (2013). Gender Issues in Corporate Leadership. Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics:1177-1189.
    Gender greatly impacts access to opportunities, potential, and success in corporate leadership roles. We begin with a general presentation of why such discussion is necessary for basic considerations of justice and fairness in gender equality and how the issues we raise must impact any ethical perspective on gender in the corporate workplace. We continue with a breakdown of the central categories affecting the success of women in corporate leadership roles. The first of these includes gender-influenced behavioral factors, such as the (...)
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  16. Ronald R. Sims & Johannes Brinkmann (2003). Enron Ethics (Or: Culture Matters More Than Codes). [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 45 (3):243 - 256.
    This paper describes and discusses the Enron Corporation debacle. The paper presents the business ethics background and leadership mechanisms affecting Enron''s collapse and eventual bankruptcy. Through a systematic analysis of the organizational culture at Enron (following Schein''s frame of reference) the paper demonstrates how the company''s culture had profound effects on the ethics of its employees.
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  17. Yau-De Wang & Hui-Hsien Hsieh (2012). Toward a Better Understanding of the Link Between Ethical Climate and Job Satisfaction: A Multilevel Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):535-545.
    Research concerning the relationship between psychological ethical climate and job satisfaction is popular in the literature. However, to date, no study in the literature has simultaneously investigated both the effects of individual-level and organization-level ethical climates on employees’ job satisfaction. On the basis of a multilevel analysis, the present study used a sample of 472 full-time employees from 31 organizations in Taiwan to examine the above two effects. Results from the analyses showed that within the organizations, individual employees’ instrumental climate (...)
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Corporate Codes of Ethics
  1. George C. S. Benson (1989). Codes of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 8 (5):305 - 319.
    Partly as a result of much recent evidence of business and government crime, a large proportion of major corporations have adopted codes of ethics; government service is also making more use of them. The electrical manufacturing anti-trust conspiracy and 1973–1976 investigation of foreign and domestic bribery were immediate prods. There are also government codes of which the ASPA code is most widely distributed. Corporate codes discuss relations to employees, interemployee relationships, whistle blowing, effect on environment, commercial bribery, insider information, other (...)
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  2. Mark S. Blodgett & Patricia J. Carlson (1997). Corporate Ethics Codes: A Practical Application of Liability Prevention. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1363-1369.
    With the great increase in litigation, insurance costs, and consumer prices, both managers and businesses should take a proactive position in avoiding liability. Legal liability may attach when a duty has been breached; many actions falling into this category are also considered unethical. Since much of business liability is caused by a breach of a duty by a business to either an individual, another business, or to society, this article asserts that the practice of liability prevention is a practical business (...)
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  3. Aat Brakel (2007). The Moral Standard of a Company: Performing the Norms of Corporate Codes. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 3 (1):95-103.
    Bottom lines and codes provide a corporation with guidelines for dealing with the inside and outside world. Bottom lines have the oldest papers through Frederic Taylor's Scientific Management, dated beginning 20th century. Codes came into existence in its midst with the emerging sustainability agenda, referring both to technical detail and human judgement. Corporate codes present themselves as a policy document with collective rules handed down by way of a top-down approach. Since an effective code is dependent on the motivation of (...)
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  4. Johannes Brinkmann & Knut Ims (2003). Good Intentions Aside: Drafting a Functionalist Look at Codes of Ethics. Business Ethics 12 (3):265–274.
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  5. Heather E. Canary & Marianne M. Jennings (2008). Principles and Influence in Codes of Ethics: A Centering Resonance Analysis Comparing Pre- and Post-Sarbanes-Oxley Codes of Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):263 - 278.
    This study examines the similarities and differences in pre- and post-Sarbanes-Oxley corporate ethics codes and codes of conduct using the framework of structuration theory. Following the passage of the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) legislation in 2002 in the United States, publicly traded companies there undertook development and revision of their codes of ethics in response to new regulatory requirements as well as incentives under the U.S. Corporate Sentencing Guidelines, which were also revised as part of the SOX mandates. Questions that remain are (...)
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  6. Margaret Anne Cleek & Sherry Lynn Leonard (1998). Can Corporate Codes of Ethics Influence Behavior? Journal of Business Ethics 17 (6):619 - 630.
    There is increasing public interest in understanding the nature of corporate ethics due to the knowledge that unethical decisions and activities frequently undermine the performance and abilities of many organizations. Of the current literature found on the topic of ways organizations can influence ethical behavior, a majority is found on the issue of corporate codes of ethics.Most discussions on codes of ethics evaluate the contents of the codes and offer opinions on their wording, content, and/or value. Unfortunately, very little research (...)
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  7. Han Donker, Deborah Poff & Saif Zahir (2008). Corporate Values, Codes of Ethics, and Firm Performance: A Look at the Canadian Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):527 - 537.
    In this empirical study, we present two new models that are corporate ethics based. The first model numerically quantifies the corporate value index (CV-Index) based on a set of predefined parameters and the second model estimates the market-to-book values of equity in relation to the CV-Index as well as other parameters. These models were applied to Canadian companies listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX). Through our analysis, we found statistically significant evidence that corporate values (CV-Index) positively correlated with firm (...)
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  8. William C. Frederick (1991). The Moral Authority of Transnational Corporate Codes. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (3):165 - 177.
    Ethical guidelines for multinational corporations are included in several international accords adopted during the past four decades. These guidelines attempt to influence the practices of multinational enterprises in such areas as employment relations, consumer protection, environmental pollution, political participation, and basic human rights. Their moral authority rests upon the competing principles of national sovereignty, social equity, market integrity, and human rights. Both deontological principles and experience-based value systems undergird and justify the primacy of human rights as the fundamental moral authority (...)
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  9. Claus Strue Frederiksen (2010). The Relation Between Policies Concerning Corporate Social Responsibility (Csr) and Philosophical Moral Theories – an Empirical Investigation. Journal of Business Ethics 93 (3):357 - 371.
    This article examines the relation between policies concerning Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and philosophical moral theories. The objective is to determine which moral theories form the basis for CSR policies. Are they based on ethical egoism, libertarianism, utilitarianism or some kind of common-sense morality? In order to address this issue, I conducted an empirical investigation examining the relation between moral theories and CSR policies, in companies engaged in CSR. Based on the empirical data I collected, I start by suggesting some (...)
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  10. Eyun-Jung Ki, Hong-Lim Choi & Junghyuk Lee (2012). Does Ethics Statement of a Public Relations Firm Make a Difference? Yes It Does!! Journal of Business Ethics 105 (2):267-276.
    Attempting to determine solutions for unethical practices in the field, this research was designed to assess the effectiveness of public relations firms’ ethics statements in decreasing the incidence of malpractice. This study revealed an encouraging finding that practitioners working in firms with ethical parameters were significantly more likely to engage in ethical practices. Moreover, educating public relations practitioners about the content of ethics statement could positively influence their ethical practices. At the same time, this study’s findings suggest further questions for (...)
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  11. Einar Marnburg (2000). The Behavioural Effects of Corporate Ethical Codes: Empirical Findings and Discussion. Business Ethics 9 (3):200–210.
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  12. Patrick E. Murphy (2005). Developing, Communicating and Promoting Corporate Ethics Statements: A Longitudinal Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (2):183 - 189.
    This paper reports on the findings of the third in a series of surveys of large U.S.-based and multinational corporations on their ethics statements. Focusing on four types – values statement, corporate credo, code of ethics and Internet privacy policy – we find growth in the use of these statements over the last decade. We discuss the external communication of these statements, including the avenues that are now used for promotion and their intended audiences. The paper concludes with a number (...)
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  13. Patrick E. Murphy (1995). Corporate Ethics Statements: Current Status and Future Prospects. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (9):727 - 740.
    This paper reports on a study of large U.S. based corporations concerning the status of formal ethics statements. Almost all responding firms (91%) have promulgated a formal code of ethics while one-half have published values statements and about one-third have a corporate credo. Analysis of these statements concentrated on to whom they are communicated; whether codes of ethics contain information pertinent to the industry, include sanctions for violations and provide specific guidance regarding gifts. Conclusions and implications for managers and researchers (...)
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