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  1. Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas de Block (eds.) (2011). Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Oxford University Press.
    Maladapting Minds discusses a number of reasons why philosophers of psychiatry should take an interest in evolutionary explanations of mental disorders and, more generally, in evolutionary thinking. First of all, there is the nascent field of evolutionary psychiatry. Unlike other psychiatrists, evolutionary psychiatrists engage with ultimate, rather than proximate, questions about mental illnesses. Being a young and youthful new discipline, evolutionary psychiatry allows for a nice case study in the philosophy of science. Secondly, philosophers of psychiatry have engaged with evolutionary (...)
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  2. Nomy Arpaly (2005). How It is Not "Just Like Diabetes&Quot;: Mental Disorders and the Moral Psychologist. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):282–298.
  3. Alan Baddeley (2007). Working Memory, Thought, and Action. OUP Oxford.
    'Working Memory, Thought, and Action' is the magnum opus of one of the most influential cognitive psychologists of the past 50 years. This new volume on the model he created (with Graham Hitch) discusses the developments that have occurred within the model in the past twenty years, and places it within a broader context. -/- Working memory is a temporary storage system that underpins our capacity for coherent thought. Some 30 years ago, Baddeley and Hitch proposed a way of thinking (...)
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  4. William P. Banks (1996). Korsakoff and Amnesia. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):22-26.
  5. Michael Bavidge (2006). Under the Floorboards: Examining the Foundations of Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):75-77.
  6. Derek Bolton (1996). Mind, Meaning, and Mental Disorder: The Nature of Causal Explanation in Psychology and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophical ideas about the mind, brain, and behavior can seem theoretical and unimportant when placed alongside the urgent questions of mental distress and disorder. However, there is a need to give direction to attempts to answer these questions. On the one hand, a substantial research effort is going into the investigation of brain processes and the development of drug treatments for psychiatric disorders, and on the other, a wide range of psychotherapies is becoming available to adults and children with mental (...)
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  7. John Bond & Lynne Corner (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment: Where Does It Go From Here? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):29-30.
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  8. Lisa Bortolotti & Rochelle Cox (2009). Faultless Ignorance: Strengths and Limitations of Epistemic Definitions of Confabulation. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):952-965.
    There is no satisfactory account for the general phenomenon of confabulation, for the following reasons: (1) confabulation occurs in a number of pathological and non-pathological conditions; (2) impairments giving rise to confabulation are likely to have different neural bases; and (3) there is no unique theory explaining the aetiology of confabulations. An epistemic approach to defining confabulation could solve all of these issues, by focusing on the surface features of the phenomenon. However, existing epistemic accounts are unable to offer sufficient (...)
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  9. Pascal Boyer (2011). Intuitive Expectations and the Detection of Mental Disorder: A Cognitive Background to Folk-Psychiatries. Philosophical Psychology 24 (1):95-118.
  10. Mark Bratton (2010). Anorexia, Welfare, and the Varieties of Autonomy: Judicial Rhetoric and the Law in Practice. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (2):159-162.
    In English medical law, it is something of an axiom that adult competent patients have an absolute right to refuse all and any medical treatment, including potentially life-saving and life-sustaining treatment. This legal proposition, which is embedded in the doctrine of consent, has for the last few decades been regarded as the expression of the philosophical principle of personal autonomy and ethical right of self-determination. The Western ethical and legal traditions places heavy emphasis on notions of personal sovereignty reflected in (...)
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  11. Axel Buchner & Edgar Erdfelder (1996). On Assumptions of, Relations Between, and Evaluations of Some Process Dissociation Measurement Models. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (4):581-594.
  12. Axel Buchner & Werner Wippich (1996). Investigating Fame Judgments: On the Generality of Hypotheses, Conclusions, and Measurement Models. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):226-231.
  13. Daniel Collerton & Elaine Perry (2011). Dreaming and Hallucinations – Continuity or Discontinuity? Perspectives From Dementia with Lewy Bodies. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1016-1020.
  14. Daniel Collerton, Elaine Perry & Ian McKeith (2005). Still PADing Along: Perception and Attention Remain Key Factors in Understanding Complex Visual Hallucinations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):776-794.
    Commentators agree that the Perception and Attention Deficit (PAD) model is a promising model for accounting for recurrent complex visual hallucinations (RCVH) across several disorders, though with varying detailed criticisms. Its central tenets are not modified, but further consideration of generative models of visual processing and the relationship of proto-objects and memory systems allows the PAD model to deal with variations in phenomenology. The commentaries suggest new ways to generate evidence that will test the model.
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  15. Joe Cruz (1997). Simulation and the Psychology of Sociopathy. Behavioral And Brain Sciences 20 (3):525-527.
    Mealey's (1995a) psychological explanation of the sociopath's antisocial activity appeals to an incomplete or nonstandard theory of mind. This is not the only possible mechanism of mental state attribution. The simulation theory of mental state ascription offers a better hope of explaining the diverse elements of sociopathy reported by Mealey.
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  16. Richard J. Davidson, Amygdalar and Hippocampal Substrates of Anxious Temperament Differ in Their Heritability.
    Anxious temperament (AT) in human and non-human primates is a trait-like phenotype evident early in life that is characterized by increased behavioural and physiological reactivity to mildly threatening stimuli1–4. Studies in children demonstrate that AT is an important risk factor for the later development of anxiety disorders, depression and comorbid substance abuse5. Despite its importance as an early predictor of psychopathology, little is known about the factors that predispose vulnerable children to develop AT and the brain systems that underlie its (...)
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  17. Ricardo de Oliveira-Souza, Jorge Moll, Fátima Azevedo Ignácio & Paul J. Eslingerc (2002). Catatonia: A Window Into the Cerebral Underpinnings of Will. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):582-584.
    The will is one of the three pillars of the trilogy of mind that has pervaded Western thought for millennia, the other two being affectivity and cognition (Hilgard 1980). In the past century, the concept of will was imperceptibly replaced by the cognitive-oriented behavioral qualifiers “voluntary,” “goal-directed,” “purposive,” and “executive” (Tranel et al. 1994), and has lost much of its heuristic merits, which are related to the notion of “human autonomy” (Lhermitte 1986). We view catatonia as the clinical expression of (...)
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  18. David DeGrazia (1994). Autonomous Action and Autonomy-Subverting Psychiatric Conditions. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (3):279-297.
    The following theses are defended in this paper: (1) The concept of autonomous action is centrally relevant to understanding numerous psychiatric conditions, namely, conditions that subvert autonomy; (2) The details of an analysis of autonomous action matter; a vague or rough characterization is less illuminating; (3) A promising analysis for this purpose (and generally) is a version of the "multi-tier model". After opening with five vignettes, I begin the discussion by highlighting strengths and weaknesses of contributions by other authors who (...)
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  19. Damiaan Denys (2011). Obsessionality & Compulsivity: A Phenomenology of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6 (1):3-.
    Progress in psychiatry depends on accurate definitions of disorders. As long as there are no known biologic markers available that are highly specific for a particular psychiatric disorder, clinical practice as well as scientific research is forced to appeal to clinical symptoms. Currently, the nosology of obsessive-compulsive disorder is being reconsidered in view of the publication of DSM-V. Since our diagnostic entities are often simplifications of the complicated clinical profile of patients, definitions of psychiatric disorders are imprecise and always indeterminate. (...)
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  20. Simon Dymond & Louise McHugh (2005). Symbolic Behavior and Perspective-Taking Are Forms of Derived Relational Responding and Can Be Learned. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):697-697.
    Numerous questions remain unanswered concerning the functional determinants of symbolic behavior and perspective-taking, particularly regarding the capabilities of children with autism. An alternative approach that considers these behaviors to be forms of derived relational responding allows for the design of functional intervention programs to establish such repertoires in individuals for whom they are absent.
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  21. Roar Fosse (2000). William James's The Fringe of Consciousness REM Mentation in Narcoleptics and Normals. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):514-515.
  22. Gregory Fricchione (2002). Catatonia: A Disorder of Motivation and Movement. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):584-585.
    Georg Northoff employs a comparison with Parkinson's disease in an effort to tease apart the underlying pathophysiology of psychogenic catatonia. Northoff's extensive treatment of the subject is abetted by his own research as well as the research of others. Nevertheless, a number of points concerning basal ganglia/thalamocortical processing need to be raised, some adding support to his hypothesis and others detracting from it.
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  23. Pascual Angel Gargiulo & Adriana Ines Landa de Gargiulo (2004). Perception and Psychoses: The Role of Glutamatergic Transmission Within the Nucleus Accumbens Septi. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):792-793.
    In agreement with Behrendt & Young (B&Y), we considered the role of perception disturbances in schizophrenia in our first clinical approaches, using the Bender test with schizophrenic patients. Following this, we reproduced nuclear symptoms of schizophrenia in animal models, showing that perceptual disturbances, acquisition disturbances, and decrease in affective levels can be induced by glutamatergic blockade within the nucleus accumbens septi. Our results link the proposed corticostriatal dysfunction with the thalamocortical disturbances underlying perceptual problems reviewed by B&Y.
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  24. Philip Gerrans (2003). Nativism and Neuroconstructivism in the Explanation of Williams Syndrome. Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):41-52.
    Nativists about syntactic processing have argued that linguisticprocessing, understood as the implementation of a rule-basedcomputational architecture, is spared in Williams syndrome, (WMS)subjects – and hence that it provides evidence for a geneticallyspecified language module. This argument is bolstered by treatingSpecific Language Impairments (SLI) and WMS as a developmental doubledissociation which identifies a syntax module. Neuroconstructivists haveargued that the cognitive deficits of a developmental disorder cannot beadequately distinguished using the standard gross behavioural tests ofneuropsychology and that the linguistic abilities of the (...)
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  25. Simona Giordano (2010). The Fisherman and the Assassin: Reflections on Anorexia Nervosa. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (2):163-167.
    A short story of an assassin and a sleeping old Fisherman: Before I explain the rationale of this anecdote, let me begin my response by saying how grateful I am to Bratton and Tomasini for engaging with me over such a thorny and unpleasant topic. Many of us have either suffered eating disorders, or have a relative or a friend who has had an eating disorder, or who has died with anorexia. I still remember giving a talk on anorexia nervosa, (...)
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  26. Robert Gordon, Autism and the "Theory of Mind" Debate Robert M. Gordon and John A. Barker.
    With this understanding, children are better able to anticipate the behavior of others and to attune their own behavior accordingly. In mentally retarded children with Down's syndrome, attainment of such competence is delayed, but it is generally acquired by the time they reach the mental age of 4, as measured by tests of nonverbal intelligence. Thus from a developmental perspective, attainment of the mental age of 4 appears to be of profound significance for acquisition of what we shall call psychological (...)
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  27. Claude Gottesmann (2004). Paradoxical Sleep and Schizophrenia Have the Same Neurobiological Support. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):794-795.
    During the paradoxical dreaming sleep stage, characterized by hallucinations and delusions, as in schizophrenia, the increased subcortical release of dopamine, the presynaptic inhibition of thalamic relay nuclei, and serotonergic disinhibition are in accordance with the model for the mechanism of hallucination-induction.
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  28. Richard Griffin & Daniel C. Dennett, What Does the Study of Autism Tell Us About the Craft of Folk Psychology?
    Autism is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by difficulties in social interaction (APA, 2000). Successful social interaction relies, in part, on determining the thoughts and feelings of others, an ability commonly attributed to our faculty of folk or common-sense psychology. Because the symptoms of autism should be present by around the second birthday, it follows that the study of autism should tell us something about the early emerging mechanisms necessary for the development of an intact faculty of folk psychology. Our aims (...)
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  29. Thomas Grisso & Paul S. Appelbaum (2007). Appreciating Anorexia: Decisional Capacity and the Role of Values. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (4):293-297.
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  30. Mary R. Harvey & Judith Lewis Herman (1994). Amnesia, Partial Amnesia, and Delayed Recall Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):295-306.
  31. William S. Helton, Martin J. Dorahy & Paul N. Russell (2011). Dissociative Tendencies and Right-Hemisphere Processing Load: Effects on Vigilance Performance. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):696-702.
  32. Helene Hembrooke & Stephen J. Ceci (1995). Traumatic Memories: Do We Need to Invoke Special Mechanisms? Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):75-82.
  33. Allan Hobson & Ursula Voss (2011). A Mind to Go Out Of: Reflections on Primary and Secondary Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):993-997.
  34. Ralph E. Hoffman, Maxine Varanko, Thomas H. McGlashan & Michelle Hampson (2004). Auditory Hallucinations, Network Connectivity, and Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):860-861.
    Multidisciplinary studies indicate that auditory hallucinations may arise from speech perception neurocircuitry without disrupted theory of mind capacities. Computer simulations of excessive pruning in speech perception neural networks provide a model for these hallucinations and demonstrate that connectivity reductions just below a “psychotogenic threshold” enhance information processing. These data suggest a process whereby vulnerability to schizophrenia is maintained in the human population despite reproductive disadvantages of this illness.
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  35. Jakob Hohwy & Raben Rosenberg (2005). Cognitive Neuropsychiatry: Conceptual, Methodological and Philosophical Perspectives. World Journal of Biological Psychiatry 6 (3):192-197.
    Cognitive neuropsychiatry attempts to understand psychiatric disorders as disturbances to the normal function of human cognitive organisation, and it attempts to link this functional framework to relevant brain structures and their pathology. This recent scientific discipline is the natural extension of cognitive neuroscience into the domain of psychiatry. We present two examples of recent research in cognitive neuropsychiatry: delusions of control in schizophrenia, and affective disorders. The examples demonstrate how the cognitive approach is a fruitful and necessary supplement to the (...)
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  36. Mark L. Howe, Mary L. Courage & Carole Peterson (1994). How Can I Remember When "I" Wasn′T There: Long-Term Retention of Traumatic Experiences and Emergence of the Cognitive Self. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):327-355.
  37. Mary Lyn Huffman, Angela M. Crossman & Stephen J. Ceci (1997). “Are False Memories Permanent?”: An Investigation of the Long-Term Effects of Source Misattributions. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (4):482-490.
  38. Julian C. Hughes (2011). Thinking Through Dementia. OUP Oxford.
    With a rapidly expanding elderly population, there has been a marked increase in the incidence of dementia, and this dreadful, debilitating illness now affects - directly or indirectly - millions of people across the world. Dementia throws up a number of particular clinical, ethical, and conceptual problems, which mostly reflect complicated evaluative decisions, for instance about diagnosis and the distinction between normal and abnormal ageing. -/- Different disciplines approach dementia in different ways - thus there are disease, cognitive neuropsychology, and (...)
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  39. Glyn Humphreys (2012). There's Binding and There's Binding, or is There Just Binding? : Neuropsychological Insights From Bálint's Syndrome. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press. 324.
  40. Daniel D. Hutto (2003). Folk Psychological Narratives and the Case of Autism. Philosophical Papers 32 (3):345-361.
    This paper builds on the insights of Jerome Bruner by underlining the central importance of narratives explaining actions in terms of reasons, arguing that by giving due attention to the central roles that narratives play in our everyday understanding of others provides a better way of explicating the nature and source of that activity than does simulation theory, theory-theory or some union of the two. However, although I promote Bruner’s basic claims about the roles narratives play in this everyday enterprise, (...)
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  41. Ejgil Jespersen, Anika A. Jordbru & Egil Martinsen (2008). Conversion Gait Disorder—Meeting Patients in Behaviour, Reuniting Body and Mind. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (2):185-199.
    The Hospital for Rehabilitation, Stavern, in Norway has treated patients with physical symptoms with no organic cause, so called conversion disorder patients, for over a decade. For four years research on the treatment has been carried out. Patients with conversion disorder seem not to fit in traditional somatic hospitals because their patienthood depends upon psychiatric diagnosis. Ironically, they appear not to belong in psychiatric hospitals because of their physical symptoms. The treatment offered these patients at hospitals for rehabilitation is adapted (...)
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  42. Ayeesha K. Kamal & Nicholas D. Schiff (2002). Does the Form of Akinetic Mutism Linked to Mesodiencephalic Injuries Bridge the Double Dissociation of Parkinson's Disease and Catatonia? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):586-587.
    Northoff provides a compelling argument supporting a kind of “double dissociation” of Parkinson's disease and catatonia. We discuss a related form of akinetic mutism linked to mesodiencephalic injuries and suggest an alternative to the proposed “horizontal” versus “vertical” modulation distinction. Rather than a “directional” difference in patterned neuronal activity, we propose that both disorders reflect hypersynchrony within typically interdependent but segregated networks facilitated by a common thalamic gating mechanism.
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  43. Bonnie J. Kaplan (1999). The Neurobiology of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) as a Model of the Neurobiology of Personality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):526-527.
  44. Roumen Kirov (2006). Spectrum of Child Psychiatric Disorders and Ritualized Behavior: Where is the Link? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):622-623.
    There is a spectrum of child psychiatric and neurological disorders, in all of which a comorbidity with obsessive-compulsive disorder and ritualized behavior is very common. Therefore, they may appear as a basis for the rituals in children that cross into adolescence and adulthood. Resolving the nature of these disorders may help us to better understand “Why ritualized behavior?” (Published Online February 8 2007).
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  45. Herman H. H. J. Kolk & Robert J. Hartsuiker (1999). Aphasia, Prefrontal Dysfunction, and the Use of Word-Order Strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):103-103.
    Caplan & Waters's neuropsychological evidence for two types of verbal working memory rests entirely on a very restricted definition of “syntactic complexity,” one in terms of word order. This opens the possibility that the dissociation they observe relates to the differential use of word-order strategies rather than to the structure of verbal working memory.
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  46. S. S. Korsakoff (1996). Medico-Psychological Study of a Memory Disorder. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):2-21.
  47. Neil Levy (2007). Norms, Conventions, and Psychopaths. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (2):pp. 163-170.
  48. Neil Levy (2007). The Responsibility of the Psychopath Revisited. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (2):pp. 129-138.
    The question of the psychopath's responsibility for his or her wrongdoing has received considerable attention. Much of this attention has been directed toward whether psychopaths are a counterexample to motivational internalism (MI): Do they possess normal moral beliefs, which fail to motivate them? In this paper, I argue that this is a question that remains conceptually and empirically intractable, and that we ought to settle the psychopath's responsibility in some other way. I argue that recent empirical work on the moral (...)
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  49. Göran Lindqvist & Helge Malmgren (1993). Classification and Diagnosis of Organic Mental Disorders. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Supplement 88:5-17.
    A new diagnostic system for organic psychiatry is presented. We first define "organic psychiatry", and then give the theoretical basis for conceiving organic psychiatric disorders in terms of hypothetical psychopathogenetic processes, HPP:s. Such hypothetical disorders are not strictly identical to the clusters of symptoms in which they typically manifest themselves, since the symptoms may be concealed or modified by intervening factors in non typical circumstances and/or in the simultaneous presence of several disorders. The six basic disorders in our system are (...)
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  50. Michael Loughlin (2011). Psychologism, Overpsychologism, and Action. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (4):305-309.
    To someone coming fairly fresh to this debate, Sykes’ paper is somewhat shocking. The psychogenic inference seems such an obvious fallacy, yet he shows, with detailed reference to both diagnostic practice and the literature on mental disorders, the extraordinary pervasiveness of its influence, extending even to the systematic ambiguities built into key diagnostic terms. Sykes characterizes the inference in the following terms: “If there is no known physical cause for a symptom or disorder, the cause must be psychological” (2010, 290). (...)
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