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  1. Luís Urbano Afonso (2010). Devoções Maiores E Devoções Menores Na Pintura Mural Portuguesa Dos Séculos XV E XVIGreater and Lesser Religious Practices in 15th and 16th Century Portuguese Mural Painting. [REVIEW] Cultura:11-23.
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  2. Joseph C. Allard (1982). Mechanism, Music, and Painting in 17th Century France. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 40 (3):269-279.
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  3. Philip Alperson (ed.) (1992). The Philosophy of the Visual Arts. Oxford University Press.
    Most instructors who teach introductory courses in aesthetics or the philosophy of arts use the visual arts as their implicit reference for "art" in general, yet until now there has been no aesthetics anthology specifically orientated to the visual arts. This text stresses conceptual and theoretical issues, first examining the very notion of "the visual arts" and then investigating philosophical questions raised by various forms, from painting, the paradigmatic form, to sculpture, photography, film, dance, kitsch, and other forms on the (...)
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  4. Jerome Ashmore (1977). Sound in Kandinsky's Painting. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (3):329-336.
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  5. Jerome Ashmore (1955). Some Differences Between Abstract and Non-Objective Painting. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 13 (4):486-495.
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  6. Jerome Ashmore (1951). The Old and the New in Non-Objective Painting. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 9 (4):294-300.
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  7. Bernard Baars (2008). Velasquez and the Postmodern Circle of Mirrors. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (9):35-39.
    I agree with Uzi Awret that Diego Velasquez's seminal painting, Las Meninas, is an expression of self-consciousness in many different ways. But my first response was to the feeling tone Velasquez evokes in his work, which felt dark and rather grim to me. I think this painting may be a meditation on the mortification of the flesh, a theme that was surely familiar to Velasquez. It is a contemplation of human vanity. Self-consciousness is not just a cognitive act. The so-called (...)
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  8. Stephen Bann (1970). Experimental Painting: Construction, Abstraction, Destruction, Reduction. London,Studio Vista.
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  9. Katerina Bantinaki (2010). Pictorial Perception as Twofold Experience. In Catharine Abell Katerina Bantinaki (ed.), Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction. Oup Oxford.
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  10. R. B. Beckett (1964). Photogenic Drawings. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 27:342-343.
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  11. Jiri Benovsky (2014). The Limits of Photography. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (5):716-733.
    This paper is about what counts as a photograph and what does not. One way in which this question arises stems from new technologies that keep changing our way of producing photographs, such as digital photography, which not only has now widely replaced traditional film photography but also challenges the very limits of what we count as a photograph. I shall discuss below at some length different aspects of digital photography, but also want to focus here on a new striking (...)
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  12. Rona Blogg (1933). About the Art of Painting. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 11 (2):99 – 109.
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  13. Peg Brand (2007). Painting the Difference: Sex and Spectator in Modern Art by Harrison, Charles. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (2):244–246.
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  14. Robert Briscoe, Depiction, Pictorial Experience, and Vision Science.
    Pictures are 2D surfaces designed to elicit 3D-scene-representing experiences from their viewers. In this essay, I argue that philosophers have tended to underestimate the relevance of research in vision science to understanding the nature of pictorial experience or ‘seeing-in’, to use Richard Wollheim’s familiar expression. Both the deeply entrenched methodology of virtual psychophysics as well as empirical studies of pictorial space perception provide compelling support for the view that seeing-in and seeing face-to-face are experiences of the same psychological, explanatory kind. (...)
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  15. Donald Brook (1983). Painting, Photography and Representation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 42 (2):171-180.
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  16. Norman Bryson (1978). Hazlitt on Painting. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 37 (1):37-45.
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  17. Christopher Butler (2004). Pleasure and the Arts: Enjoying Literature, Painting, and Music. Oxford University Press.
    How do the arts give us pleasure? Covering a very wide range of artistic works, from Auden to David Lynch, Rembrandt to Edward Weston, and Richard Strauss to Keith Jarrett, Pleasure and the Arts offers us an explanation of our enjoyable emotional engagements with literature, music, and painting. The arts direct us to intimate and particularized relationships, with the people represented in the works, or with those we imagine produced them. When we listen to music, look at a purely abstract (...)
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  18. David Carrier (1987). Naturalism and Allegory in Flemish Painting. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (3):237-249.
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  19. David Carrier (1973). Adrian Stokes and the Theory of Painting. British Journal of Aesthetics 13 (2):133-145.
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  20. Curtis L. Carter (1974). Langer and Hofstadter on Painting and Language: A Critique. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 32 (3):331-342.
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  21. Dan Cavedon-Taylor (2011). The Space of Seeing-In. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (3):271-278.
    Recent work on seeing-in has taken a pluralist turn. There is variety among pictures, so we should expect variety among seeing-in. Dominic Lopes’s taxonomy of seeing-in is arguably the most thorough that is currently available. Lopes identifies five varieties of seeing-in. In this paper I identify a sixth: pseudo-actualism. This paper improves our current best taxonomy of seeing-in.
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  22. Clive Cazeaux (1999). Synaesthesia and Epistemology in Abstract Painting. British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (3):241-251.
  23. Chung-yuan Chang (1969). On Stephen C. Pepper's "on the Uses of Symbolism in Sculpture and Painting". Philosophy East and West 19 (3):279-283.
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  24. Ron Chrisley (2008). Painting an Experience: Las Meninas, Consciousness and the Aesthetic Mode. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (9):40-45.
    Paintings are usually paintings of things: a room in a palace, a princess, a dog. But what would it be to paint not those things, but the experience of seeing those things? Las Meninas is sufficiently sophisticated and masterfully executed to help us explore this question. Of course, there are many kinds of paintings: some abstract, some conceptual, some with more traditional subjects. Let us start with a focus on naturalistically depictive paintings: paintings that aim to cause an experience in (...)
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  25. David Ridgley Clark (1963). Landscape Painting Effects in Pope's Homer. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 22 (1):25-28.
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  26. Earle Jerome Coleman (1978). Philosophy of Painting by Shih-Tʻao: A Translation and Exposition of His Hua-Pʻu (Treatise on the Philosophy of Painting). Mouton.
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  27. Elizabeth Burns Coleman (2004). Appreciating "Traditional" Aboriginal Painting Aesthetically. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (3):235-247.
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  28. Elizabeth Burns Coleman (2001). Aboriginal Painting: Identity and Authenticity. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (4):385–402.
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  29. Paul Crowther (1985). Greenberg's Kant and the Problem of Modernist Painting. British Journal of Aesthetics 25 (4):317-325.
    This paper analyzes the kantian aspects of greenberg's theory of modernism. It is argued first that the distinctiveness of greenberg's theory lies not in a kantian-Style aesthetic formalism, But rather in an intellectualist notion of aesthetic value which greenberg associates with a kantian-Style self-Critical method. It is then argued that greenberg's use of this kantian notion of self-Criticism in order to explain the development of modernist painting, Leads him into insuperable problems.
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  30. W. Joseph Cummins (1982). Plato and Greek Painting. Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (1):91-92.
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  31. Gregory Currie (1991). Photography, Painting and Perception. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (1):23-29.
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  32. Carlette Engel de Janosi (1953). The Forest of Fontainebleau in Painting and Writing. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 11 (4):390-396.
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  33. Marc De Mey (2001). Jan Van Eyck Going Beyond Color: The Grisailles in the Ghent Altar-Piece. Philosophica 68.
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  34. Jacques Derrida (1987). The Truth in Painting. University of Chicago Press.
    "The four essays in this volume constitute Derrida's most explicit and sustained reflection on the art work as pictorial artifact, a reflection partly by way of philosophical aesthetics (Kant, Heidegger), partly by way of a commentary on art works and art scholarship (Van Gogh, Adami, Titus-Carmel). The illustrations are excellent, and the translators, who clearly see their work as both a rendering and a transformation, add yet another dimension to this richly layered composition. Indispensable to collections emphasizing art criticism and (...)
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  35. John Dilworth (2008). The Propositional Challenge to Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (2):115-144.
    It is generally accepted that Picasso might have used a different canvas as the vehicle for his painting Guernica, and also that the artwork Guernica itself necessarily represents a certain historical episode—rather than, say, a bowl of fruit. I argue that such a conjunctive acceptance entails a broadly propositional view of the nature of representational artworks. In addition, I argue—via a comprehensive examination of possible alternatives—that, perhaps surprisingly, there simply is no other available conjunctive view of the nature of representational (...)
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  36. William V. Dunning (1991). The Concept of Self and Postmodern Painting: Constructing a Post-Cartesian Viewer. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (4):331-336.
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  37. Eugene Clinton Elliott (1958). On the Understanding of Color in Painting. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 16 (4):453-470.
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  38. Andreas Elpidorou (2010). Imagination in Non-Representational Painting. In Jonathan Webber (ed.), Reading Sartre: On Phenomenology and Existentialism. Routledge.
  39. C. E. Emmer (2004). Representing Place. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 57 (3):610-612.
  40. Véronique Fóti (ed.) (1996). Merleau-Ponty: Difference, Materiality, Painting.
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  41. Véronique Marion Fóti (ed.) (1996). Merleau-Ponty: Difference, Materiality, Painting. Humanities Press.
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  42. Cynthia Freeland (2007). Portraits in Painting and Photography. Philosophical Studies 135 (1):95 - 109.
    This article addresses the portrait as a philosophical form of art. Portraits seek to render the subjective objectively visible. In portraiture two fundamental aims come into conflict: the revelatory aim of faithfulness to the subject, and the creative aim of artistic expression. In the first part of my paper, studying works by Rembrandt, I develop a typology of four different things that can be meant when speaking of an image’s power to show a person: accuracy, testimony of presence, emotional characterization, (...)
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  43. Wayne J. Froman (1988). Action Painting and the World-as-Picture. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (4):469-475.
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  44. Jeffrey L. Geller (1993). Painting, Parapraxes, and Unconscious Intentions. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (3):377-387.
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  45. Jonathan Gilmore (2000). The Life of a Style: Beginnings and Endings in the Narrative History of Art. Cornell University Press.
    In The Life of a Style, Jonathan Gilmore claims that such narrative developments inhere in the history of art itself.By exploring such topics as the discovery ...
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  46. Alan H. Goldman (1995). The Aesthetic Value of Representation in Painting. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (2):297-310.
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  47. R. A. Goodrich (1982). Plato on Poetry and Painting. British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (2):126-137.
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  48. Donald A. Gordon (1951). Experimental Psychology and Modern Painting. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 9 (3):227-243.
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  49. Carla Gottlieb (1958). Movement in Painting. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 17 (1):22-33.
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  50. Stephen Grossberg (2006). The Art of Seeing and Painting. Technical Report.
    The human urge to represent the three-dimensional world using two-dimensional pictorial representations dates back at least to Paleolithic times. Artists from ancient to modern times have struggled to understand how a few contours or color patches on a flat surface can induce mental representations of a three-dimensional scene. This article summarizes some of the recent breakthroughs in scientifically understanding how the brain sees that shed light on these struggles. These breakthroughs illustrate how various artists have intuitively understand paradoxical properties about (...)
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