This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
23 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Felicia Ackerman (1990). Analysis, Language, and Concepts: The Second Paradox of Analysis. Philosophical Perspectives 4:535-543.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Kenneth Barber (1968). A Note on a Paradox of Analysis. Philosophical Studies 19 (3):37 - 43.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Max Black (1945). The "Paradox of Analysis" Again: A Reply. Mind 54 (215):272-273.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Max Black (1944). The "Paradox of Analysis". Mind 53 (211):263-267.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. H. G. Callaway (1993). Context for Meaning and Analysis, A Critical Study in the Philosophy of Language. Rodopi.
    This book provides a concise overview, with excellent historical and systematic coverage, of the problems of the philosophy of language in the analytic tradition. Howard Callaway explains and explores the relation of language to the philosophy of mind and culture, to the theory of knowledge, and to ontology. He places the question of linguistic meaning at the center of his investigations. The teachings of authors who have become classics in the field, including Frege, Russell, Carnap, Quine, Davidson, and Putnam are (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Dennis Earl (2007). A Semantic Resolution of the Paradox of Analysis. Acta Analytica 22 (3):189-205.
    The paradox of analysis has been a problem for analytic philosophers at least since Moore’s time, and it is especially significant for those who seek an account of analysis along classical lines. The present paper offers a new solution to the paradox, where a theory of analysis is given where (1) analysandum and analysans are distinct concepts, due to their failing to share the same conceptual form, yet (2) they are related in virtue of satisfying various semantic constraints on the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. P. K. Feyerabend (1956). A Note on the Paradox of Analysis. Philosophical Studies 7 (6):92 - 96.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Richard A. Fumerton (1983). The Paradox of Analysis. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 43 (4):477-497.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Norwood Russell Hanson (1963). Equivalence: The Paradox of Theoretical Analysis. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):217 – 232.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Gary Kemp (1995). Salmon on Fregean Approaches to the Paradox of Analysis. Philosophical Studies 78 (2):153 - 162.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Lennart (1962). Comments on the Paradox of Analysis. Inquiry 5 (1-4):260 – 264.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Leonard Linsky (1949). Some Notes on Carnap's Concept of Intensional Isomorphism and the Paradox of Analysis. Philosophy of Science 16 (4):343-347.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. C. Mason Myers (1971). Moore's Paradox of Analysis. Metaphilosophy 2 (4):295–308.
    The nature of conceptual analysis is elucidated by a proposed solution to moore's paradox of analysis. Occurrent, Dispositional, And property concepts are distinguished, And the notion of epistemic gain is introduced and explained. It is shown that although a correct analysis equates property concepts this is done with epistemic gain. It is argued that in a correct analysis there must be no identity between analysans and analysandum in respect to occurrent concepts. The relevance of thought experiments to conceptual analysis is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Michael Nelson (2008). Frege and the Paradox of Analysis. Philosophical Studies 137 (2):159 - 181.
    In an unpublished manuscript of 1914 titled ‘Logic in mathematics’, Gottlob Frege offered a rich account of the paradox of analysis. I argue that Frege there claims that the explicandum and explicans of a successful analysis express the same sense and that he furthermore appreciated that this requires that one cannot conclude that two sentences differ in sense simply because it is possible for a (minimally) competent speaker to accept one without accepting the other. I claim that this is shown (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Richard C. Potter & Roderick M. Chisholm (1981). The Paradox of Analysis: A Solution. Metaphilosophy 12 (1):1–6.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. S. D. Rieber (1994). The Paradoxes of Analysis and Synonymy. Erkenntnis 41 (1):103 - 116.
    The very idea of informative analysis gives rise to a well-known paradox. Yet a parallel puzzle, herein called the paradox of synonymy, arises for statements which do not express analyses. The paradox of synonymy has a straightforward metalinguistic solution: certain words are referring to themselves. Likewise, the paradox of analysis can be solved by recognizing that certain expressions in an analysis statement are referring to their own semantic structures.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. T. W. Schick Jr (1986). Kant, Analyticity, and the Paradox of Analysis. Idealistic Studies 16 (2):125-131.
  18. Wilfrid Sellars (1950). Gestalt Qualities and the Paradox of Analysis. Philosophical Studies 1 (6):92 - 94.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Wilfrid Sellars (1950). The Identity of Linguistic Expressions and the Paradox of Analysis. Philosophical Studies 1 (2):24 - 31.
  20. Achille Varzi (1998). A Note on Analysis and Circular Definitions. Grazer Philosophische Studien 54:107-113.
    Analyses, in the simplest form assertions that aim to capture an intimate link between two concepts, are viewed since Russell's theory of definite descriptions as analyzing descriptions. Analysis therefore has to obey the laws governing definitions including some form of a Substitutivity Principle (SP). Once (SP) is accepted the road to the paradox of analysis is open. Popular reactions to the paradox involve the fundamental assumption (SV) that sentences differing only in containing an analysandum resp. an analysans express the same (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Xuefeng Wen (2007). A Propositional Logic with Relative Identity Connective and a Partial Solution to the Paradox of Analysis. Studia Logica 85 (2):251 - 260.
    We construct a a system PLRI which is the classical propositional logic supplied with a ternary construction , interpreted as the intensional identity of statements and in the context . PLRI is a refinement of Roman Suszko’s sentential calculus with identity (SCI) whose identity connective is a binary one. We provide a Hilbert-style axiomatization of this logic and prove its soundness and completeness with respect to some algebraic models. We also show that PLRI can be used to give a partial (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Morton G. White (1948). On the Church-Frege Solution of the Paradox of Analysis. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 9 (2):305-308.
  23. Morton G. White (1945). A Note on the "Paradox of Analysis". Mind 54 (213):71-72.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation