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  1. Seiki Akama & Sadaaki Miyamoto (2008). Curry and Fitch on Paradox. Logique Et Analyse 203:271-283.
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  2. Victor Allis & Teunis Koetsier (1991). On Some Paradoxes of the Infinite. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 42 (2):187-194.
    In the paper below the authors describe three super-tasks. They show that although the abstract notion of a super-task may be, as Benacerraf suggested, a conceptual mismatch, the completion of the three super-tasks involved can be defined rather naturally, without leading to inconsistency, by means of a particular kinematical interpretation combined with a principle of continuity.
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  3. J. C. Beall (2009). Knowability and Possible Epistemic Oddities. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press. 105--125.
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  4. J. C. Beall (2007). Prolegomenon to Future Revenge. In , Revenge of the Liar: New Essays on the Paradox. Oxford University Press.
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  5. Jose Luis Bermudez (2009). Truth, Indefinite Extensibility, and Fitch's Paradox. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.
    A number of authors have noted that the key steps in Fitch’s argument are not intuitionistically valid, and some have proposed this as a reason for an anti-realist to accept intuitionistic logic (e.g. Williamson 1982, 1988). This line of reasoning rests upon two assumptions. The first is that the premises of Fitch’s argument make sense from an anti-realist point of view – and in particular, that an anti-realist can and should maintain the principle that all truths are knowable. The second (...)
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  6. D. Bostock (2011). Note on Heterologicality. Analysis 71 (2):252-259.
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  7. Manuel Bremer, Frege's Basic Law V and Cantor's Theorem.
    The following essay reconsiders the ontological and logical issues around Frege’s Basic Law (V). If focuses less on Russell’s Paradox, as most treatments of Frege’s Grundgesetze der Arithmetik (GGA)1 do, but rather on the relation between Frege’s Basic Law (V) and Cantor’s Theorem (CT). So for the most part the inconsistency of Naïve Comprehension (in the context of standard Second Order Logic) will not concern us, but rather the ontological issues central to the conflict between (BLV) and (CT). These ontological (...)
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  8. Mimma Bresciani Califano (ed.) (2008). Paradossi E Disarmonie Nelle Scienze E Nelle Arti. L. S. Olschki.
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  9. Berit Brogaard (2009). On Keeping Blue Swans and Unknowable Facts at Bay : A Case Study on Fitch's Paradox. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.
    (T5) ϕ → ◊Kϕ |-- ϕ → Kϕ where ◊ is possibility, and ‘Kϕ’ is to be read as ϕ is known by someone at some time. Let us call the premise the knowability principle and the conclusion near-omniscience.2 Here is a way of formulating Fitch’s proof of (T5). Suppose the knowability principle is true. Then the following instance of it is true: (p & ~Kp) → ◊K(p & ~Kp). But the consequent is false, it is not possible to know (...)
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  10. Johnw Burgess (2009). Can Truth Out? In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.
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  11. James Cargile (1979). Paradoxes, a Study in Form and Predication. Cambridge University Press.
    These are not just tricks or puzzles, but are intimately connected with some of the liveliest and most basic philosophical disputes about logical form, ...
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  12. Alonzo Church (2009). Referee Reports on Fitch's "Definition of Value". In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press. 13--20.
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  13. Michael Clark (2012). Paradoxes From A to Z, 3rd Ed. Routledge.
    This third edition is revised throughout, and adds nine new paradoxes that have important bearings in areas such as law, logic, ethics and probability.
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  14. Michael Clark (2009/2012). Spanish (2009), Italian (2011), Turkish (2011), German (2012) and French (2012) Translations of Paradoxes From A to Z, 2nd Ed. Editorial Gredos, S.A./Raffaello Cortina Editore.
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  15. Michael Clark (2007). Paradoxes From A to Z, 2nd Ed. Routledge.
    This essential guide to paradoxes takes the reader on a lively tour of puzzles that have taxed thinkers from Zeno to Galileo and Lewis Carroll to Bertrand Russell. Michael Clark uncovers an array of conundrums, such as Achilles and the Tortoise, Theseus' Ship, Hempel's Raven, and the Prisoners' Dilemma, taking in subjects as diverse as knowledge, ethics, science, art and politics. Clark discusses each paradox in non-technical terms, considering its significance and looking at likely solutions.
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  16. Michael Clark (2004/2006). Italian (2004) and Greek (2006) Translations of Paradoxes From A to Z. Raffaello Cortina Editore/Enalios.
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  17. Michael Clark (2002-2004). Extracts From Paradoxes From A to Z. Think (1-9).
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  18. Michael Clark (2002). Paradoxes From A to Z. Routledge.
    This essential guide to paradoxes takes the reader on a lively tour of puzzles that have taxed thinkers from Zeno to Galileo ...
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  19. Michael Clark (1989). A Paradox of Conditional Probability. Analysis 49 (1):16 - 21.
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  20. Michael Clark (1975). Utterer's Meaning and Implications About Belief. Analysis 35 (3):105 - 108.
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  21. Roy T. Cook (2013). Paradoxes. Polity.
    The care and feeding of your new paradoxes -- The truth about truth -- The title of this chapter will have its revenge -- Some collections are bigger and badder than others -- Bald, not bald, and kinda bald -- What we know about what we know -- Conclusion: many paradoxes, one solution?
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  22. John Corcoran (1989). Argumentations and Logic. ARGUMENTAION 3 (1):17-43.
    Argumentations are at the heart of the deductive and the hypothetico-deductive methods, which are involved in attempts to reduce currently open problems to problems already solved. These two methods span the entire spectrum of problem-oriented reasoning from the simplest and most practical to the most complex and most theoretical, thereby uniting all objective thought whether ancient or contemporary, whether humanistic or scientific, whether normative or descriptive, whether concrete or abstract. Analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and function of argumentations are described. Perennial philosophic (...)
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  23. Michael Dummett (2009). Fitch's Paradox of Knowability. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.
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  24. Eva Ejerhed & Sten Lindström (eds.) (1997). Logic, Action, and Cognition: Essays in Philosophical Logic. Kluwer Academic.
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  25. Nicholas Falletta (1983/1990). The Paradoxicon. Wiley.
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  26. Hartry Field, Harvey Lederman & Tore Fjetland Øgaard (forthcoming). Prospects for a Naive Theory of Classes. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic.
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  27. Frederic B. Fitch (1963). A Logical Analysis of Some Value Concepts. Journal of Symbolic Logic 28 (2):135-142.
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  28. Rohan French & David Ripley (forthcoming). Contractions of Noncontractive Consequence Relations. Review of Symbolic Logic.
    Some theorists have developed formal approaches to truth that depend on counterexamples to the structural rules of contraction. Here, we study such approaches, with an eye to helping them respond to a certain kind of objection. We define a contractive relative of each noncontractive relation, for use in responding to the objection in question, and we explore one example: the contractive relative of multiplicative-additive affine logic with transparent truth, or MAALT. -/- .
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  29. Thomas Gil (2005). Praktische Paradoxien. Parerga.
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  30. Nicholas Griffin (1995). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 3 (3):304-307.
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  31. Michael Hand (2009). Performance and Paradox. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.
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  32. Miroslav Hanke (2012). John Mair on Semantic Paradoxes. Studia Neoaristotelica 9 (2):154-183.
    John Mair (1467–1550) was an influential post-medieval scholar. This paper focuses on his Tractatus insolubilium, in which he proposed semantic analysis of self-referential phenomena, in particular on his solution to alethic and correspondence paradoxes and his treatment of their general semantic aspects as well as particular applications. His solution to paradoxes is based on the so-called “network evaluation”, i.e. on a semantics which defines the concepts of truth and correspondence with reality in contextual terms. Consequently, the relation between semantic valuation, (...)
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  33. W. D. Hart (2009). Invincible Ignorance. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.
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  34. Patrick Hughes (1975). Vicious Circles and Infinity: A Panoply of Paradoxes. Doubleday.
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  35. C. S. Jenkins (2009). The Mystery of the Disappearing Diamond. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press. 302--319.
    Addresses the question of why we find Fitch's knowability 'paradox' argument surprising.
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  36. Christoph Kelp & Duncan Pritchard (2009). Two Deflationary Approaches to Fitch-Style Reasoning. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press. 324--338.
    This paper considers two deflationary responses to the Fitch argument on behalf of the semantic anti-realistthat is, two responses which aim to evade the conclusion of that argument by, on a principled basis, weakening one of the principles essentially employed. The first deflationary approach that is consideredwhich proceeds by weakening the factivity principle for knowledgeis shown to be ultimately unpromising, but a second approachwhich proceeds by weakening the knowability principle that is at the heart of semantic anti-realismis shown to have (...)
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  37. Robert C. Koons (1992). Paradoxes of Belief and Strategic Rationality. Cambridge University Press.
    The purpose of this book is to develop a framework for analyzing strategic rationality, a notion central to contemporary game theory, which is the formal study of the interaction of rational agents, and which has proved extremely fruitful in economics, political theory, and business management. The author argues that a logical paradox (known since antiquity as "the Liar paradox") lies at the root of a number of persistent puzzles in game theory, in particular those concerning rational agents who seek to (...)
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  38. Jonathan Kvanvig (2009). Restriction Strategies for Knowability : Some Lessons in False Hope. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.
    The knowability paradox derives from a proof by Frederic Fitch in 1963. The proof purportedly shows that if all truths are knowable, it follows that all truths are known. Antirealists, wed as they are to the idea that truth is epistemic, feel threatened by the proof. For what better way to express the epistemic character of truth than to insist that all truths are knowable? Yet, if that insistence logically compels similar assent to some omniscience claim, antirealism is in jeopardy. (...)
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  39. G. Landini (2013). Zermelo and Russell's Paradox: Is There a Universal Set? Philosophia Mathematica 21 (2):180-199.
    Zermelo once wrote that he had anticipated Russell's contradiction of the set of all sets that are not members of themselves. Is this sufficient for having anticipated Russell's Paradox — the paradox that revealed the untenability of the logical notion of a set as an extension? This paper argues that it is not sufficient and offers criteria that are necessary and sufficient for having discovered Russell's Paradox. It is shown that there is ample evidence that Russell satisfied the criteria and (...)
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  40. Justin Leiber (1993). Paradoxes. Distributed in Usa by Focus Information Group.
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  41. Sten Lindström (2003). Frege's Paradise and the Paradoxes. In Krister Segerberg & Rysiek Sliwinski (eds.), A Philosophical Smorgasbord: Essays on Action, Truth and Other Things in Honour of Fredrick Stoutland. Uppsala Philosophical Studies 52.
    The main objective of this paper is to examine how theories of truth and reference that are in a broad sense Fregean in character are threatened by antinomies; in particular by the Epimenides paradox and versions of the so-called Russell-Myhill antinomy, an intensional analogue of Russell’s more well-known paradox for extensions. Frege’s ontology of propositions and senses has recently received renewed interest in connection with minimalist theories that take propositions (thoughts) and senses (concepts) as the primary bearers of truth and (...)
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  42. Sten Lindström (1997). Situations, Truth and Knowability: A Situation-Theoretic Analysis of a Paradox by Fitch. In Eva Ejerhed & Sten Lindström (eds.), Logic, Action and Cognition: Essays in Philosophical Logic. Kluwer.
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  43. Bernard Linsky (2009). Logical Types in Some Arguments About Knowability and Belief. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.
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  44. Dongen Ma (2004). Wu Zhi Mao Dun Yun Dong Gai Lun: Jian Tan Yu Zhou Li Shi Zhong de Ruo Gan Wen Ti. Xin Shi Dai Chu Ban She.
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  45. Robert L. Martin (1974). Relative Truth and Semantic Categories. Journal of Philosophical Logic 3 (1/2):149 - 153.
  46. Tim Maudlin (2007). Reducing Revenge to Discomfort. In J. C. Beall (ed.), Revenge of the Liar: New Essays on the Paradox. Oxford University Press.
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  47. Doris Olin (2003). Paradox. Acumen.
    An in-depth examination of paradoxes and the philosophical issues they raise.
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  48. Anna Orlandini (2003). Logical, Semantic and Cultural Paradoxes. Argumentation 17 (1):65-86.
    The property common to three kinds of paradoxes (logical, semantic, and cultural) is the underlying presence of an exclusive disjunction: even when it is put to a check by the paradox, it is still invoked at the level of implicit discourse. Hence the argumentative strength of paradoxical propositions is derived. Logical paradoxes (insolubilia) always involve two contradictory, mutually exclusive, truths. One truth is always perceived to the detriment of the other, in accordance with a succession which is endlessly repetitive. A (...)
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  49. Alessio Palmero Aprosio (2012). Pinocchio Nel Paese Dei Paradossi: Viaggio Tra le Contraddizioni Della Logica. Sironi.
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  50. William Poundstone (1988/1990). Labyrinths of Reason: Paradox, Puzzles, and the Frailty of Knowledge. Anchor Books.
    This sharply intelligent, consistently provocative book takes the reader on an astonishing, thought-provoking voyage into the realm of delightful uncertainty--a world of paradox in which logical argument leads to contradiction and common sense is seemingly rendered irrelevant.
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