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  1. Marc D. Abrams (1998). The Red Maple Paradox. BioScience 48 (5):355-364.
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  2. Seiki Akama & Sadaaki Miyamoto (2008). Curry and Fitch on Paradox. Logique Et Analyse 203:271-283.
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  3. Victor Allis & Teunis Koetsier (1991). On Some Paradoxes of the Infinite. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 42 (2):187-194.
    In the paper below the authors describe three super-tasks. They show that although the abstract notion of a super-task may be, as Benacerraf suggested, a conceptual mismatch, the completion of the three super-tasks involved can be defined rather naturally, without leading to inconsistency, by means of a particular kinematical interpretation combined with a principle of continuity.
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  4. Alan Ross Anderson (1970). Review: B. Meltzer, The Third Possibility; B. Meltzer, I. J. Good, Two Forms of the Prediction Paradox; William H. Halberstadt, In Defence of Euclid: A Reply to B. Meltzer. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (3):458-459.
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  5. Miroslava Anđelković (1997). Predictor Paradox. Theoria 40 (4):121-126.
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  6. Guillermo Badía (2013). Mundos posibles y paradojas. Areté. Revista de Filosofía 25 (2):219-229.
    Robert Adams' definition of a possible world is paradoxical according to Selmer Bringsjord, Patrick Grim and, more recently, Cristopher Menzel. The proofs given by Bringsjord and Grim relied crucially on the Powerset Axiom; Christoper Menzel showed that, while this continued tobe the case, there was still hope for Adams' definition, but Menzel he undustedan old russellian paradox in order to prove that we could obtain the same paradoxical consequences without appealing to any other set theory than the Axiomof Separation. Nevertheless, (...)
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  7. Maya Bar-Hillel & Avishai Margalit (1985). Gideon's Paradox — a Paradox of Rationality. Synthese 63 (2):139 - 155.
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  8. William H. Baumer (1965). Invalidly Invalidating a Paradox. Philosophical Quarterly 15 (61):350-352.
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  9. J. C. Beall (2009). Knowability and Possible Epistemic Oddities. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press. 105--125.
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  10. J. C. Beall (2007). Prolegomenon to Future Revenge. In , Revenge of the Liar: New Essays on the Paradox. Oxford University Press.
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  11. Timothy M. Beardsley (2010). The Environmentalist's Paradox. BioScience 60 (8):567-567.
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  12. Jean Paul Van Bendegem (1994). Ross' Paradox Is an Impossible Super-Task. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (2):743 - 748.
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  13. Jean Paul Van Bendegem (1987). Zeno's Paradoxes and the Tile Argument. Philosophy of Science 54 (2):295 - 302.
    A solution of the Zeno paradoxes in terms of a discrete space is usually rejected on the basis of an argument formulated by Hermann Weyl, the so-called tile argument. This note shows that, given a set of reasonable assumptions for a discrete geometry, the Weyl argument does not apply. The crucial step is to stress the importance of the nonzero width of a line. The Pythagorean theorem is shown to hold for arbitrary right triangles.
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  14. Jean Paul Bendegevanm (1987). Zeno's Paradoxes and the Tile Argument. Philosophy of Science 54 (2):295-.
    A solution of the zeno paradoxes in terms of a discrete space is usually rejected on the basis of an argument formulated by hermann weyl, The so-Called tile argument. This note shows that, Given a set of reasonable assumptions for a discrete geometry, The weyl argument does not apply. The crucial step is to stress the importance of the nonzero width of a line. The pythagorean theorem is shown to hold for arbitrary right triangles.
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  15. Jose Luis Bermudez (2009). Truth, Indefinite Extensibility, and Fitch's Paradox. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.
    A number of authors have noted that the key steps in Fitch’s argument are not intuitionistically valid, and some have proposed this as a reason for an anti-realist to accept intuitionistic logic (e.g. Williamson 1982, 1988). This line of reasoning rests upon two assumptions. The first is that the premises of Fitch’s argument make sense from an anti-realist point of view – and in particular, that an anti-realist can and should maintain the principle that all truths are knowable. The second (...)
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  16. J. Blau & U. Blau (1995). Epistemic Paradoxes. 1. Dialectica 49 (2-4):169-193.
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  17. Jorge Bosch (1972). ``The Examination Paradox and Formal Prediction&Quot. Logique Et Analyse 15:505-525.
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  18. D. Bostock (2011). Note on Heterologicality. Analysis 71 (2):252-259.
    1. For simplicity, let the domain of our first-level quantifiers, ‘∀ x’ and so on, be words, and in particular just those words which are adjectives. And let the adjective ‘heterological’ be abbreviated just to As is well known, one cannot legitimately stipulate that Why not? Well, the obvious answer is that if is supposed to be an adjective, then this alleged stipulation would imply the contradiction But contradictions cannot be true, and it is no use stipulating that they shall (...)
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  19. Luc Bovens & Wlodek Rabinowicz (2005). De doctrinale paradox. Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 97 (1).
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  20. Steven J. Brams (1981). A Resolution of the Paradox of Omniscience. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 3:17-30.
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  21. Manuel Bremer, Frege's Basic Law V and Cantor's Theorem.
    The following essay reconsiders the ontological and logical issues around Frege’s Basic Law (V). If focuses less on Russell’s Paradox, as most treatments of Frege’s Grundgesetze der Arithmetik (GGA)1 do, but rather on the relation between Frege’s Basic Law (V) and Cantor’s Theorem (CT). So for the most part the inconsistency of Naïve Comprehension (in the context of standard Second Order Logic) will not concern us, but rather the ontological issues central to the conflict between (BLV) and (CT). These ontological (...)
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  22. Mimma Bresciani Califano (ed.) (2008). Paradossi E Disarmonie Nelle Scienze E Nelle Arti. L. S. Olschki.
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  23. Berit Brogaard (2009). On Keeping Blue Swans and Unknowable Facts at Bay : A Case Study on Fitch's Paradox. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.
    (T5) ϕ → ◊Kϕ |-- ϕ → Kϕ where ◊ is possibility, and ‘Kϕ’ is to be read as ϕ is known by someone at some time. Let us call the premise the knowability principle and the conclusion near-omniscience.2 Here is a way of formulating Fitch’s proof of (T5). Suppose the knowability principle is true. Then the following instance of it is true: (p & ~Kp) → ◊K(p & ~Kp). But the consequent is false, it is not possible to know (...)
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  24. Johnw Burgess (2009). Can Truth Out? In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.
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  25. Linda Claire Burns (forthcoming). Vagueza: a metáfora de frege e o paradoxo sorites. Critica.
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  26. James Cargile (1990). SAINSBURY, R. M. Paradoxes. [REVIEW] Philosophy 65:106.
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  27. James Cargile (1979). Paradoxes, a Study in Form and Predication. Cambridge University Press.
    These are not just tricks or puzzles, but are intimately connected with some of the liveliest and most basic philosophical disputes about logical form, ...
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  28. Alonzo Church (2009). Referee Reports on Fitch's "Definition of Value". In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press. 13--20.
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  29. Michael Clark (2012). Paradoxes From A to Z, 3rd Ed. Routledge.
    This third edition is revised throughout, and adds nine new paradoxes that have important bearings in areas such as law, logic, ethics and probability.
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  30. Michael Clark (2009/2012). Spanish (2009), Italian (2011), Turkish (2011), German (2012) and French (2012) Translations of Paradoxes From A to Z, 2nd Ed. Editorial Gredos, S.A./Raffaello Cortina Editore.
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  31. Michael Clark (2007). Paradoxes From A to Z, 2nd Ed. Routledge.
    This essential guide to paradoxes takes the reader on a lively tour of puzzles that have taxed thinkers from Zeno to Galileo and Lewis Carroll to Bertrand Russell. Michael Clark uncovers an array of conundrums, such as Achilles and the Tortoise, Theseus' Ship, Hempel's Raven, and the Prisoners' Dilemma, taking in subjects as diverse as knowledge, ethics, science, art and politics. Clark discusses each paradox in non-technical terms, considering its significance and looking at likely solutions.
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  32. Michael Clark (2004/2006). Italian (2004) and Greek (2006) Translations of Paradoxes From A to Z. Raffaello Cortina Editore/Enalios.
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  33. Michael Clark (2004). Paradox 7: The Unexpected Examination. Think 3 (7):109-111.
    In this regular series Michael Clark, editor of the journal Analysis, presents a number of the most intriguing philosophical paradoxes. Here we examine the paradox of the unexpected examination.
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  34. Michael Clark (2002-2004). Extracts From Paradoxes From A to Z. Think (1-9).
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  35. Michael Clark (2002). Paradoxes From A to Z. Routledge.
    This essential guide to paradoxes takes the reader on a lively tour of puzzles that have taxed thinkers from Zeno to Galileo ...
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  36. Michael Clark (1989). A Paradox of Conditional Probability. Analysis 49 (1):16 - 21.
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  37. Michael Clark (1975). Utterer's Meaning and Implications About Belief. Analysis 35 (3):105 - 108.
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  38. Jeffrey Cobb (2002). Kuczynski on Partial Knowledge and the Paradox of Analysis. Metaphilosophy 33 (5):597-601.
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  39. Pablo Cobreros, Paul Egré, David Ripley & Robert van Rooij (2012). Tolerant, Classical, Strict. Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (2):347 - 385.
    In this paper we investigate a semantics for first-order logic originally proposed by R. van Rooij to account for the idea that vague predicates are tolerant, that is, for the principle that if x is P, then y should be P whenever y is similar enough to x. The semantics, which makes use of indifference relations to model similarity, rests on the interaction of three notions of truth: the classical notion, and two dual notions simultaneously defined in terms of it, (...)
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  40. Nino Cocchiarella (1973). Whither Russell's Paradox of Predication? In Milton Karl Munitz (ed.), Logic and Ontology. New York,New York University Press. 133--158.
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  41. D. G. Collingridge (1971). Pucettts 'Paradox'. Philosophy 46 (176):158-.
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  42. Roy T. Cook (2013). Paradoxes. Polity.
    The care and feeding of your new paradoxes -- The truth about truth -- The title of this chapter will have its revenge -- Some collections are bigger and badder than others -- Bald, not bald, and kinda bald -- What we know about what we know -- Conclusion: many paradoxes, one solution?
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  43. John Corcoran (1989). Argumentations and Logic. ARGUMENTAION 3 (1):17-43.
    Argumentations are at the heart of the deductive and the hypothetico-deductive methods, which are involved in attempts to reduce currently open problems to problems already solved. These two methods span the entire spectrum of problem-oriented reasoning from the simplest and most practical to the most complex and most theoretical, thereby uniting all objective thought whether ancient or contemporary, whether humanistic or scientific, whether normative or descriptive, whether concrete or abstract. Analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and function of argumentations are described. Perennial philosophic (...)
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  44. Marcel Crabbé (2011). Reassurance for the Logic of Paradox. Review of Symbolic Logic 4 (3):479-485.
    Counterexamples to reassurance relative to a relation between models of the logic of paradox are provided. Another relation, designed to fix the problem in logic without equality, is introduced and discussed in connection with the issue of classical recapture.
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  45. Theodore de Laguna (1916). On Certain Logical Paradoxes. Philosophical Review 25 (1):16-27.
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  46. Michael Dummett (2009). Fitch's Paradox of Knowability. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.
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  47. Eva Ejerhed & Sten Lindström (eds.) (1997). Logic, Action, and Cognition: Essays in Philosophical Logic. Kluwer Academic.
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  48. Nicholas Falletta (1983/1990). The Paradoxicon. Wiley.
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  49. Hartry Field, Harvey Lederman & Tore Fjetland Øgaard (forthcoming). Prospects for a Naive Theory of Classes. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic.
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  50. Frederic B. Fitch (1963). A Logical Analysis of Some Value Concepts. Journal of Symbolic Logic 28 (2):135-142.
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