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  1. Leonard Angel (2015). Is There Adequate Empirical Evidence for Reincarnation? An Analysis of Ian Stevenson’s Work. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 575-583.
    This article reviews the research of “top rebirth scientist” Ian Stevenson on spontaneous past-life memory cases, focusing on three key problems with Stevenson’s work. First, his research of entirely anecdotal case reports contains a number of errors and omissions. Second, like other reincarnation researchers, Stevenson has done no controlled experimental work on such cases; yet only such research could ever resolve whether the correspondences found between a child’s statements and a deceased person’s life exceed what we might find by chance. (...)
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  2. Anthony P. Atkinson, I. S. Baker, Susan J. Blackmore, William Braud, Jean E. Burns, R. H. S. Carpenter, Christopher J. S. Clarke, Ralph D. Ellis, David Fontana, Christopher C. French, D. Radin, M. Schlitz, Stefan Schmidt & Max Velmans (2005). Open Peer Commentary on 'the Sense of Being Stared At' Parts 1 &. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (6):50-116.
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  3. Keith Augustine (2015). Introduction. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 1-47.
    The Introduction provides a general overview of the issues discussed in The Myth of an Afterlife in more detail in the individual selections, structured according to the four parts of the volume, plus preceding introductory and subsequent concluding comments. -/- [1. Preliminary Considerations] [2. Empirical Arguments for Annihilation] [3. Conceptual and Empirical Difficulties for Survival] [4. Problematic Models of the Afterlife] [5. Dubious Evidence for Survival] [6. The Importance of Empirical Consideration] [7. Alternative Paranormal Explanations of the Survival Evidence] [8. (...)
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  4. Keith Augustine (2015). Near-Death Experiences Are Hallucinations. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 529-569.
    Reports of near-death experiences (NDEs) with suggestive or manifestly hallucinatory features strongly imply that NDEs are not glimpses of an afterlife, but rather internally generated fantasies. Such features include discrepancies between what is seen in the seemingly physical environment of “out-of-body” NDEs and what is actually happening in the physical world at the time, bodily sensations felt after near-death experiencers (NDErs) have ostensibly departed the physical world altogether and entered a transcendental realm, encounters with living persons and fictional characters while (...)
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  5. Keith Augustine (2007). Does Paranormal Perception Occur in Near-Death Experiences? Journal of Near Death Studies 25 (4):203-236.
    While most near-death researchers have disregarded reports of near-death experiences (NDEs) with hallucinatory features, many have sought cases of veridical paranormal perception during NDEs. But despite more than a quarter century of near-death studies, no compelling evidence that NDErs can obtain information from remote locations during their NDEs has been forthcoming. This paper, Part I of a critique of survivalist interpretations of NDEs, reviews the quality of the evidence for veridical observations during NDEs, and finds the case for veridical paranormal (...)
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  6. Keith Augustine (2007). Near-Death Experiences with Hallucinatory Features. Journal of Near Death Studies 26 (1):3-31.
    Though little systematic attention has been given to near-death experiences (NDEs) with clear or suggestive hallucinatory features, reports of such experiences strongly imply that NDEs are not glimpses of an afterlife. This paper, Part II of a critique of survivalist interpretations of NDEs, surveys NDEs incorporating out-of-body discrepancies, bodily sensations, encounters with living persons and fictional characters, random or insignificant memories, returns from a point of no return, hallucinatory imagery, and unfulfilled predictions. Though attempts to accommodate hallucinatory NDEs within a (...)
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  7. Keith Augustine (2007). Psychophysiological and Cultural Correlates Undermining a Survivalist Interpretation of Near-Death Experiences. Journal of Near Death Studies 26 (2):89-125.
    This paper, Part III of a critique of survivalist interpretations of near-death experiences (NDEs), considers psychophysiological and cultural correlates of NDEs suggesting that such experiences are solely products of individuals' minds rather than windows into a transcendental realm. While current psychophysiological models do not fully explain out-of-body experiences (OBEs) and NDEs, several psychophysiological correlates offer promising clues about the mechanisms implicated in their production. These correlates do not definitively identify their precise causes, but strongly imply that such experiences represent internally (...)
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  8. Keith Augustine & Yonatan I. Fishman (2015). The Dualist’s Dilemma: The High Cost of Reconciling Neuroscience with a Soul. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 203-292.
    Tight correlations between mental states and brain states have been observed time and again within the ethology of biologically ingrained animal behaviors, the comparative psychology of animal minds, the evolutionary psychology of mental adaptations, the behavioral genetics of inherited mental traits, the developmental psychology of the maturing mind, the psychopharmacology of mind-altering substances, and cognitive neuroscience more generally. They imply that our mental lives are only made possible because of brain activity—that having a functioning brain is a necessary condition for (...)
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  9. Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.) (2015). The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case Against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Because every single one of us will die, most of us would like to know what—if anything—awaits us afterward, not to mention the fate of lost loved ones. Given the nearly universal vested interest we personally have in deciding this question in favor of an afterlife, it is no surprise that the vast majority of books on the topic affirm the reality of life after death without a backward glance. But the evidence of our senses and the ever-gaining strength of (...)
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  10. Christian Battista, Nicolas Gauvrit & Etienne LeBel (2015). Madness in the Method: Fatal Flaws in Recent Mediumship Experiments. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 615-630.
    This paper reviews one of the most methodologically rigorous studies of mediumship conducted to date. On the surface, the statistical procedures used by Julie Beischel and Gary E. Schwartz in the study seem to support the existence of anomalous information reception (AIR), but in fact have been misapplied. Other methodological flaws are fatal, including unaccounted for researcher degrees of freedom, which completely calls into question Beischel and Schwartz’s conclusion regarding AIR. We conclude by proposing an experimental design more appropriate for (...)
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  11. John Beloff (1990). Parapsychology and Radical Dualism. In The Relentless Question. Mcfarland & Company.
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  12. John Beloff (1990). The Relentless Question. McFarland & Company.
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  13. John Beloff (1989). Dualism: A Parapsychological Perspective. In J. Smythies & John Beloff (eds.), The Case for Dualism. Virginia University Press.
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  14. John Beloff (1987). Parapsychology and the Mind-Body Problem. Inquiry 30 (September):215-25.
    The paper argues that there are effectively only two tenable theories of the mind?brain relationship: ?epiphenomenalism? and ?radical dualism? (interactionism). So long as account is taken only of the conventional sciences, the odds are heavily stacked in favour of epiphenomenalism. However, once the findings of parapsychology are admitted to consideration, a very different situation obtains. It is here argued that parapsychology only makes sense within a dualist metaphysic.
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  15. John Beloff (1980). Could There Be a Physical Explanation for Psi? Journal of the Society for Psychical Research 50:263-272.
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  16. John Beloff (1976). Mind-Body Interactionism in Light of the Parapsychological Evidence. Theoria to Theory 10 (May):125-37.
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  17. John Beloff (1973). The Subliminal and the Extrasensory. Parapsychology Review 4:23-27.
  18. D. J. Bem & C. Honorton (1994). Does Psi Exist? Replicable Evidence for an Anomalous Process of Information Transfer. Psychological Bulletin 115:4-18.
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  19. L. Stafford Betty (2004). Mind, Paranormal Experience, and the Inadequacy of Materialism. International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (3):373-392.
    Contemporary materialist theories purporting to account for experience are seriously flawed, for they fail to accommodate the full range of human experience, especially paranormal experience. Substance Dualism (SD) is re-examined in light of this experience,including telepathy and clairvoyance, mediumship, the near-death experience, and reincarnation cases involving children’s memories. A different kind of materialism postulating degrees of fi neness and vibration—one prefigured by the ancient Stoics and developed hereunder the heading Transcendental Materialism (TM)—is also explored. The inadequacies of both reductive and (...)
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  20. Dick Bierman (2003). Does Consciousness Collapse the Wave-Packet? Mind and Matter 1 (1):45-57.
    The 'subjective reduction' interpretation of measurement in quantum physics proposes that the collapse of the wave-packet, associated with measurement, is due to the consciousness of human observers. A refined conceptual replication of an earlier experiment, designed and carried out to test this interpretation in the 1970s, is reported. Two improvements are introduced. First, the delay between pre-observation and final observation of the same quantum event is increased from a few microseconds in the original experiment to one second in this replication. (...)
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  21. Dick Bierman (2001). On the Nature of Anamalous Phenomena: Another Reality Between the World of Subjective Consciousness and the Objective World of Physics? In P. Loockvane (ed.), The Physical Nature of Consciousness. John Benjamins. 29--269.
  22. Dick Bierman (1998). Do Psi Phenomena Suggest Radical Dualism? In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.
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  23. Susan Blackmore (2015). The Implausibility of Astral Bodies and Astral Worlds. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 393-403.
    Astral body views posit that an exotic double with a definite location in space—an astral or ethereal body—leaves the normal biological body during out-of-body experiences or after death. In this paper the severe difficulties confronting such a view are reviewed, difficulties concerning not only the nature of the double which travels, but the nature of the world in which it travels. Three exhaustive possibilities are considered: that a physical double travels in the physical world; that a nonphysical double travels in (...)
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  24. Susan Blackmore (2015). Out-of-Body Experiences Are Not Evidence for Survival. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 519-527.
    This paper reviews the evidence that something leaves the body during out-of-body experiences (OBEs) and thus could potentially survive death. First, during OBEs people can purportedly see things at a distance without using the recognized senses. Second, some claim that the double or astral body can be detected. Finally, there is evidence from OBEs occurring near death. This paper evaluates each in turn.
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  25. Susan Blackmore (1992). Psychic Experiences: Psychic Illusions. Skeptical Inquirer 16:367-376.
    Why do so many people believe in psychic phenomena? Because they have psychic experiences. And why do they have psychic experiences? Because such experiences are an inevitable consequence of the way we think. I suggest that, like visual illusions, they are the price we pay for a generally very effective relationship with a massively complex world.
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  26. Susan J. Blackmore (2001). What Can the Paranormal Teach Us About Consciousness ? Skeptical Inquirer 25 (2):22-27.
    Consciousness is a hot topic. Relegated to the fringes of science for most of the twentieth century, the question of consciousness only crept back to legitimacy with the collapse of behaviourism in the 1960s and 1970s, and only recently became an acceptable term for psychologists to use. Now many neuroscientists talk enthusiastically about the nature of consciousness, there are societies and regular conferences, and some say that consciousness is the greatest challenge for twenty-first century science. Although confusion abounds, there is (...)
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  27. Susan J. Blackmore (1998). Why Psi Tells Us Nothing About Consciousness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.
    Also published in 1998 in S.R.Hameroff, A.W.Kaszniak and .C.Scott (Eds) _Toward a Science of_ _Consciousness II._ MIT Press. 701-707. Note that there were problems with the editing of this volume and there are some misprints. This version is correct.
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  28. Susan J. Blackmore (1991). Psi in Science. Journal of the Society for Psychical Research 57:404-11.
  29. W. G. Braud (1994). The Role of Mind in the Physical World: A Psychologist's View. European Journal of Parapsychology 10:66-77.
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  30. Stephen E. Braude (ed.) (1986). The Limits of Influence: Psychokinesis and the Philosophy of Science. Routledge and Kegan Paul.
    The Limits of Influence is a detailed examination and defense of the evidence for largescale-psychokinesis . It examines the reasons why experimental evidence has not, and perhaps cannot, convince most skeptics that PK is genuine, and it considers why traditional experimental procedures are important to reveal interesting facts about the phenomena.
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  31. Stephen E. Braude (1979). ESP and Psychokineses: A Philosophical Examination. Temple University Press.
    This work was the first sustained philosophical study of psychic phenomena to follow C.D. Broad's LECTURES ON PSYCHICAL RESEARCH, written nearly twenty years ...
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  32. Jean E. Burns (2006). The Arrow of Time and the Action of the Mind at the Molecular Level. In Daniel P. Sheehan (ed.), Frontiers of Time. American Inst. Of Physics.
    A new event is defined as an intervention in the time reversible dynamical trajectories of particles in a system. New events are then assumed to be quantum fluctuations in the spatial and momentum coordinates, and mental action is assumed to work by ordering such fluctuations. It is shown that when the cumulative values of such fluctuations in a mean free path of a molecule are magnified by molecular interaction at the end of that path, the momentum of a molecule can (...)
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  33. Jean E. Burns (2003). What is Beyond the Edge of the Known World? Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (6-7):7-28.
    Experiments show that psi differs from known physical processes in a variety of ways, and these differences are described herein. Because of these, psi cannot be accounted for in terms of presently known physical laws. A number of theories, of which we review a sampling, suggest ways in which known physical laws might be expanded in order to account for psi. However, there is no agreement on which of these theories, if any, will ultimately provide a general explanation. A further (...)
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  34. Jean E. Burns (2002). Quantum Fluctuations and the Action of the Mind. Noetic Journal 3 (4):312-317.
    It is shown that if mental influence can change a position or momentum coordinate within the limits of the uncertainty principle, such change, when magnified by a single interaction, is sufficient to order the direction of traveling molecules. Mental influence could initiate an action potential in the brain through this process by using the impact of ordered molecules to open the gates of sodium channels in neuronal membranes. It is shown that about 80 ordered molecules, traveling at thermal velocity in (...)
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  35. Jean E. Burns (1993). Current Hypotheses About the Nature of the Mind-Brain Relationship and Their Relationship to Findings in Parapsychology. In K. Ramakrishna Rao (ed.), Cultivating Consciousness. Praeger.
  36. Jean E. Burns (1993). Time, Consciousness, and Psi. In B. Kane, J. Millay & D. H. Brown (eds.), Silver Threads: 25 Years of Parapsychology Research. Praeger.
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  37. Jean E. Burns (1986). Consciousness and Psi. PSI Research 5:166-205.
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  38. Christopher J. S. Clarke (2005). The Sense of Being Stared At: Its Relevance to the Physics of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (6):78-82.
  39. Geoffrey O. Dean & Ivan W. Kelly (2003). Is Astrology Relevant to Consciousness and Psi? Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (6):175-198.
    Abstract: Many astrologers attribute a successful birth-chart reading to what they call intuition or psychic ability,where the birth chart acts like a crystal ball. As in shamanism,they relate consciousness to a transcendent reality that,if true, might require are-assessment of present biological theories of consciousness.In Western countries roughly 1 person in 10,000 is practising or seriously studying astrology, so their total number is substantial. Many tests of astrologers have been made since the 1950s but only recently has a coherent review been (...)
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  40. Frank B. Dilley (1990). Telepathy and Mind-Brain Dualism. Journal of the Society for Psychical Research 56:129-37.
  41. Frank B. Dilley (1989). Mind-Brain Interaction and Psi. Southern Journal of Philosophy 26 (4):469-80.
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  42. Magne Dybvig (1987). On the Philosophy of Psi. Inquiry 30 (September):253-275.
    The paper attempts to clarify some conceptual, epistemological, and ontological issues connected with so?called psi phenomena. In part I an attempt is made to clarify the various ways in which the concept of psi may be used. The concept is tied to the concept of intentional content. Part II discusses how psi phenomena can be verified/falsified and in what sense parapsychology may be a scientific discipline in spite of there being no empirically well?founded theories about psi as such. In part (...)
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  43. Hoyt L. Edge (1989). Psi, Self, and the New Mentalism. In L. Henkel & John R. Palmer (eds.), Research in Parapsychology 1989. Scarecrow Press.
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  44. Werner Ehm (2005). Meta-Analysis O Mind-Matter Experiments: A Statistical Modeling Perspective. Mind and Matter 3 (1):85-132.
    Are there relationships between consciousness and the material world? Empirical evidence for such a connection was reported in several meta-analyses of mind-matter experiments designed to address this question. In this paper we consider such meta-analyses from a statistical modeling perspective, emphasizing strategies to validate the models and the associated statistical procedures. In particular, we explicitly model increased data variability and selection mechanisms, which permits us to estimate 'selection profiles ' and to reassess the experimental effect in view of potential other (...)
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  45. J. Eisenbud (1975). The Mind-Matter Interface. Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research 69:115-26.
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  46. Amit Goswami (1986). The Quantum Theory of Consciousness and Psi. PSI Research 5:145-65.
  47. David Ray Griffin (1994). Dualism, Materialism, Idealism, and Psi: A Reply to John Palmer. Journal of the American Society of Psychical Research 88:23-39.
  48. David Ray Griffin (1993). Parapsychology and Philosophy: A Whiteheadian Postmodern Perspective. Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research 87:217-88.
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  49. Stanislav Grof (2000). Psychology of the Future: Lessons From Modern Consciousness Research. State University of New York Press.
    This accessible and comprehensive overview of the work of Stanislav Grof, one of the founders of transpersonal psychology, was specifically written to acquaint...
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  50. S. R. Hameroff, A. W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.) (1996). Towards a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press.
    Toward a Science of Consciousness marks the first major gathering—a landmark event—devoted entirely to unlocking the mysteries of consciousness.
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