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  1. David Archard (2013). Against Paternalism: Justifying Coercive Paternalism by Sarah Conly, 2012 Cambridge, Cambridge University Press216 Pp, £55.00 (Hb). [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (4):397-400.
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  2. Samuel Bard (1769/1996). A Discourse Upon the Duties of a Physician: With Some Sentiments, on the Usefulness and Necessity of a Public Hospital: Delivered Before the President and Governors of King' College, Held on the 16th of May 1769: As Advice to Those Gentlemen Who Then Received the First Medical Degrees Conferred by That University. [REVIEW] Applewood Books.
    This classic essay on the responsibilities of a doctor was first published in New York in 1769. It remains a perfect gift for a young doctor just starting out or for one who is older and wiser. This classic will be an inspiration to any who read its timeless message.
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  3. Tom L. Beauchamp (2009). Principles of Biomedical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This edition represents a thorough-going revision of what has become a classic text in biomedical ethics. Major structural changes mark the revision. The authors have added a new concluding chapter on methods that, along with its companion chapter on moral theory, emphasizes convergence across theories, coherence in moral justification, and the common morality. They have simplified the opening chapter on moral norms which introduces the framework of prima facie moral principles and ways to specify and balance them. Together with the (...)
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  4. Tom L. Beauchamp (1994). Principles of Biomedical Ethics / Tom L. Beauchamp, James F. Childress. Oxford University Press.
    This is an extremely thorough revision of the leading textbook of bioethics. The authors have made many improvements in style, organization, argument and content. These changes reflect advances in the bioethics literature over the past five years. The most dramatic expansions of the text are in the comprehensiveness with which the authors treat different currents in ethical theory and the greater breadth and depth of their discussion of public policy and public health issues. In every chapter, readers will find new (...)
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  5. Kerry Brace & Leon VandeCreek (1991). The Justification of Paternalistic Actions in Psychotherapy. Ethics and Behavior 1 (2):87 – 103.
    This article defines the nature of paternalistic interventions in psychotherapy and discusses reasons why the client's right to consent to treatment is important. We describe a reasoning process developed by Culver and Gert (1982) that can be used to determine when paternalistic actions are and are not ethically justifiable in mental health practice. We demonstrate how this procedure may be applied to psychotherapy by using a number of case illustrations.
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  6. Dan W. Brock (1985). Review Essay/a Case for Limited Paternalism. Criminal Justice Ethics 4 (2):79-88.
    John Kleinig, Paternalism Totowa, NJ: Rowman & Allanheld, 1984, xiii + 242 pp.
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  7. D. G. Brown (1989). More on Self-Enslavement and Paternalism in Mill. Utilitas 1 (01):144-.
  8. Stephen M. Campbell (2013). An Analysis of Prudential Value. Utilitas 25 (03):334-54.
    This essay introduces and defends a new analysis of prudential value. According to this analysis, what it is for something to be good for you is for that thing to contribute to the appeal or desirability of being in your position. I argue that this proposal fits well with our ways of talking about prudential value and well-being; enables promising analyses of the related concepts of luck, selfishness, self-sacrifice, and paternalism; preserves the relationship between prudential value and the attitudes of (...)
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  9. James F. Childress (1982). Who Should Decide?: Paternalism in Health Care. Oxford University Press.
    "A very good book indeed: there is scarcely an issue anyone has thought to raise about the topic which Childress fails to treat with sensitivity and good judgement....Future discussions of paternalism in health care will have to come to terms with the contentions of this book, which must be reckoned the best existing treatment of its subject."--Ethics. "A clear, scholarly and balanced analysis....This is a book I can recommend to physicians, ethicists, students of both fields, and to those most affected--the (...)
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  10. Michael Cholbi (2013). Kantian Paternalism and Suicide Intervention. In Christian Coons Michael Weber (ed.), Paternalism: Theory and Practice. Cambridge University Press.
  11. Simon Clarke (2003). Paternalism and Access to Medical Records. Journal of Information Ethics 12 (1):80-91.
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  12. Norman O. Dahl (1988). Review Essay / Against Legal Paternalism. Criminal Justice Ethics 7 (2):67-78.
    Joel Feinberg, Harm to Self Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986, xxiii + 412 pp.
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  13. Ulrich Diehl (2003). Über die Würde der Kinder als Patienten. In C. Wiesemann, A. Dörries, G. Wolfslast & A. Simon (eds.), Das Kind als Patient. Campus.
    In der Medizin gehören Kinder neben Ausländern, Behinderten und psychiatrisch Erkrankten zu den besonders vulnerablen Patientengruppen. Im Folgenden soll die Frage nach der Würde der Kinder in medizinethischer Hinsicht behandelt werden. Dazu werden drei Thesen erläutert und begründet: (1.) das Prinzip der Menschenwürde kann nicht ganz außer Acht gelassen werden, wenn Kinder als Patienten in medizinethischer Hinsicht thematisiert werden; (2.) das Prinzip der Menschenwürde wird in der Medizinethik nicht schon vollständig durch die medizinethischen Prinzipien der Patientenautonomie und der Fürsorge für (...)
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  14. Kalle Grill & Jessica Fahlquist (2012). Responsibility, Paternalism and Alcohol Interlocks. Public Health Ethics 5 (2):116-127.
    Drink driving causes great suffering and material destruction. The alcohol interlock promises to eradicate this problem by technological design. Traditional counter-measures to drink driving such as policing and punishment and information campaigns have proven insufficient. Extensive policing is expensive and intrusive. Severe punishment is disproportionate to the risks created in most single cases. If the interlock becomes inexpensive and convenient enough, and if there are no convincing moral objections to the device, it may prove the only feasible as well as (...)
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  15. Daniel Groll (2014). Medical Paternalism - Part 1. Philosophy Compass 9 (3):194-203.
    Medical clinicians – doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners etc. – are charged to act for the good of their patients. But not all ways of acting for a patient's good are on par: some are paternalistic; others are not. What does it mean to act paternalistically, both in general and specifically in a medical context? And when, if ever, is it permissible for a clinician to act paternalistically? -/- This paper deals with the first question, with a special focus on paternalism (...)
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  16. Daniel Groll (2014). Medical Paternalism – Part 2. Philosophy Compass 9 (3):194-203.
    Medical clinicians – doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners etc. – are charged to act for the good of their patients. But not all ways of acting for a patient's good are on par: some are paternalistic; others are not. What does it mean to act paternalistically, both in general and specifically in a medical context? And when, if ever, is it permissible for a clinician to act paternalistically? In Medical Paternalism Part 1, I answered the first question. This paper answers the (...)
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  17. Daniel Groll (2012). Paternalism, Respect, and the Will. Ethics 122 (4):692-720.
    In general, we think that when it comes to the good of another, we respect that person’s will by acting in accordance with what he wills because he wills it. I argue that this is not necessarily true. When it comes to the good of another person, it is possible to disrespect that person’s will while acting in accordance with what he wills because he wills it. Seeing how this is so, I argue, enables us to clarify the distinct roles (...)
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  18. Pelle Guldborg Hansen (2012). Should We Be “Nudging” for Cadaveric Organ Donations? American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):46-48.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 46-48, February 2012.
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  19. Peter Hobson (1984). Another Look at Paternalism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (2):293-304.
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  20. Heidi Hurd (2009). Paternalism On Pain of Punishment. Criminal Justice Ethics 28 (1):49-73.
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  21. Sandro Limentani (2002). From Paternalism to Managerialism. Philosophy of Management 2 (1):3-9.
    Traditionally, medical professionals have taken a paternalistic stance towards their patients and have relied on a traditional approach to medical ethics. In recent years, in Britain, however, a new 'managerialism' has developed in the National Health Service (the NHS). This stresses consumerism and greater patient choice and is changing the relationship between doctors and patients. This paper draws out the implications for patients. It describes the ethical characteristics of the two conflicting approaches and argues the need to stress again the (...)
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  22. Alex John London (2012). A Non-Paternalistic Model of Research Ethics and Oversight: Assessing the Benefits of Prospective Review. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):930-944.
    This paper offers a non-paternalistic justification for prospective research review as providing a credible social assurance that the institutions of scientific advancement respect and affirm the moral equality of all community members and as creating a “market” in which stakeholders working to advance diverse ends also advance the common good.
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  23. S. Van McCrary & A. Terry Walman (1990). Procedural Paternalism in Competency Determination. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 18 (1-2):108-113.
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  24. J. -F. Menard (2010). A 'Nudge' for Public Health Ethics: Libertarian Paternalism as a Framework for Ethical Analysis of Public Health Interventions? Public Health Ethics 3 (3):229-238.
    Is it possible to interfere with individual decision-making while preserving freedom of choice? The purpose of this article is to assess whether ‘libertarian paternalism’, a set of political and ethical principles derived from the observations of behavioural sciences, can form the basis of a viable framework for the ethical analysis of public health interventions. First, the article situates libertarian libertarianism within the broader context of the law and economics movement. The main tenets of the approach are then presented and particular (...)
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  25. Michael S. Merry (2007). The Well-Being of Children, the Limits of Paternalism, and the State: Can Disparate Interests Be Reconciled? Ethics and Education 2 (1):39-59.
    For many, it is far from clear where the prerogatives of parents to educate as they deem appropriate end and the interests of their children, immediate or future, begin. In this article I consider the educational interests of children and argue that children have an interest in their own well-being. Following this, I will examine the interests of parents and consider where the limits of paternalism lie. Finally, I will consider the state's interest in the education of children and discuss (...)
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  26. Rick Momeyer (2000). Heavy Drinking on Campus and University Paternalism. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):147-151.
    Both for reasons of their own and because of congressionally mandated changes in the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, many colleges and universities have changed the way they deal with alcohol abuse by their students. One of these changes has been to adopt a policy of “Parental Notification” according to which parents of an underaged student found guilty of consuming alcohol are notified after a first offense. I argue that this is a paternalistic policy in need of justification, and (...)
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  27. Mark Munsterhjelm & Frederic Gilbert (2010). How Do Research Duties Conflict with Aboriginal Rights? Genetics Research and Biobank Problem in Taiwan. Dilemata 2 (4):33-56.
    Taiwan has a population of 23 million, of which some 500,000 are Aborigines. Recent conflicts over a national biobank as part of Taiwan's biotechnological industrial development, genetic research on Aboriginal origins, and commercialization of research findings involving Aborigines have raised a number of important ethical conflicts. These ethical conflicts involve on one hand, the importance of researchers' duties, and on the other hand, Aboriginal rights. This paper will go in three steps. First, this paper describes the three cases of ethical (...)
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  28. A. T. Nuyen (1983). Paternalism and Liberty. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (3):27-38.
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  29. Ayşe Begüm Ötken & Tuna Cenkci (2012). The Impact of Paternalistic Leadership on Ethical Climate: The Moderating Role of Trust in Leader. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (4):525 - 536.
    The purpose of this empirical study is to investigate the effect of paternalistic leadership (PL) on ethical climate and the moderating role of trust in leader. Convenience sampling is used as a sampling procedure and the data were obtained from 227 Turkish employees. The findings indicated that PL had some effect on ethical climate. Furthermore, partial support was found for the moderating effect of trust in leader on the relationship between PL and ethical climate. The results of the study showed (...)
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  30. Elizabeth Prior Jonson, Margaret Lindorff & Linda McGuire (2012). Paternalism and the Pokies: Unjustified State Interference or Justifiable Intervention? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):259-268.
    The Australian Productivity Commission and a Joint Select Committee on Gambling Reform have recommended implementation of a mandatory pre-commitment system for electronic gambling. Organizations associated with the gambling industry have protested that such interventions reduce individual rights, and will cause a reduction in revenue which will cost jobs and reduce gaming venue support for local communities. This article is not concerned with the design details or the evidence base of the proposed scheme, but rather with the fundamental criticism that a (...)
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  31. Laura Purdy (1992). In Their Best Interest? The Case Against Equal Rights for Children. Cornell University Press.
    Proponents of children's liberation (CL) argue that there are no morally relevant differences between children and adults. Consequently, special protective laws that limit children's freedom are unjustified, and should be abolished. Protectionists reject the premise of this argument, and hence also the conclusion. Proponents of CL mostly fix upon the capacity for instrumental reasoning as the criterion that should separate autonomous from non-autonomous individuals. I argue that most children are substantially worse at instrumental reasoning than most adults, and although drawing (...)
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  32. Mark Sagoff (1984). Paternalism and the Regulation of Drugs. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (2):43-57.
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  33. Jan Steutel & Ben Spiecker (2002). Reasonable Paternalism and the Limits of Sexual Freedom: A Response to Greenspan and Leicester and Cooke. Journal of Moral Education 31 (2):189-194.
    This response argues that Greenspan's comment is basically incoherent, and that the position taken by Leicester and Cooke has unacceptable practical consequences. Greenspan admits that many people with 'mental retardation' lack adult decision-making capacities, but at the same time assumes that they have these very capacities in assigning them freedom rights. Leicester and Cooke consistently argue that people with 'mental retardation' do have adult reasoning powers and therefore should be given freedom rights. But this position has the rather disquieting implication (...)
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  34. Richard Tur (1985). Paternalism and the Criminal Law. Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (2):173-189.
  35. Marcel Verweij & Mariëtte van Den Hoven (2012). Nudges in Public Health: Paternalism Is Paramount. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):16-17.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 16-17, February 2012.
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  36. Andrew von Hirsch (2008). Direct Paternalism: Criminalizing Self-Injurious Conduct. Criminal Justice Ethics 27 (1):25-33.
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  37. Alex Voorhoeve (2013). Response to Rabin. In Adam Oliver (ed.), Behavioural Public Policy. Cambridge University Press.
    This chapter analyses the behavioural economist Matthew Rabin's work on biases in decision-making. Rabin argues that these biases cause self-harm and that we should tax individuals to ensure that they do not give in to these biases. The chapter's core question is whether there is a soft-paternalistic justification for these taxes. The answer is nuanced. It argues that Rabin’s description of these biases as “irrational” is not always appropriate—sometimes, for example, they are merely a form of preference change. When they (...)
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  38. Gentian Vyshka & Jera Kruja (2011). Inapplicability of Advance Directives in a Paternalistic Setting: The Case of a Post-Communist Health System. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):12-.
    Background: The Albanian medical system and Albanian health legislation have adopted a paternalistic position with regard to individual decision making. This reflects the practices of a not-so-remote past when state-run facilities and a totalitarian philosophy of medical care were politically imposed. Because of this history, advance directives concerning treatment refusal and do-not-resuscitate decisions are still extremely uncommon in Albania. Medical teams cannot abstain from intervening even when the patient explicitly and repeatedly solicits therapeutic abstinence. The Albanian law on health care (...)
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  39. Daniel Wikler (1979). Paternalism and the Mildly Retarded. Philosophy and Public Affairs 8 (4):377-392.
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  40. Pak-Hang Wong (2013). Technology, Recommendation and Design: On Being a 'Paternalistic' Philosopher. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):27-42.
    Philosophers have talked to each other about moral issues concerning technology, but few of them have talked about issues of technology and the good life, and even fewer have talked about technology and the good life with the public in the form of recommendation. In effect, recommendations for various technologies are often left to technologists and gurus. Given the potential benefits of informing the public on their impacts on the good life, however, this is a curious state of affairs. In (...)
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