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  1. Terrence F. Ackerman (1980). Moral Duties of Parents and Nontherapeutic Clinical Research Procedures Involving Children. Bioethics Quarterly 2 (2):94-111.
    Shared views regarding the moral respect which is owed to children in family life are used as a guide in determining the moral permissibility of nontherapeutic clinical research procedures involving children. The comparison suggests that it is not appropriate to seek assent from the preadolescent child. The analogy with interventions used in family life is similarly employed to specify the permissible limit of risk to which children may be exposed in nontherapeutic research procedures. The analysis indicates that recent writers misconceive (...)
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  2. David Archard (2013). Against Paternalism: Justifying Coercive Paternalism by Sarah Conly, 2012 Cambridge, Cambridge University Press216 Pp, £55.00 (Hb). [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (4):397-400.
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  3. Theodore Bach (2016). Children and Added Sugar: The Case for Restriction. Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4).
    It is increasingly clear that children's excessive consumption of products high in added sugar causes obesity and obesity-related health problems like type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome. Less clear is how best to address this problem through public health policy. In contrast to policies that might conflict with adult's right to self-determination — for example sugar taxes and soda bans — this article proposes that children's access to products high in added sugars should be restricted in the same (...)
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  4. Samuel Bard (1769/1996). A Discourse Upon the Duties of a Physician: With Some Sentiments, on the Usefulness and Necessity of a Public Hospital: Delivered Before the President and Governors of King' College, Held on the 16th of May 1769: As Advice to Those Gentlemen Who Then Received the First Medical Degrees Conferred by That University. [REVIEW] Applewood Books.
    This classic essay on the responsibilities of a doctor was first published in New York in 1769. It remains a perfect gift for a young doctor just starting out or for one who is older and wiser. This classic will be an inspiration to any who read its timeless message.
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  5. Tom L. Beauchamp (2009). Principles of Biomedical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This edition represents a thorough-going revision of what has become a classic text in biomedical ethics. Major structural changes mark the revision. The authors have added a new concluding chapter on methods that, along with its companion chapter on moral theory, emphasizes convergence across theories, coherence in moral justification, and the common morality. They have simplified the opening chapter on moral norms which introduces the framework of prima facie moral principles and ways to specify and balance them. Together with the (...)
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  6. Tom L. Beauchamp (1994). Principles of Biomedical Ethics / Tom L. Beauchamp, James F. Childress. Oxford University Press.
    This is an extremely thorough revision of the leading textbook of bioethics. The authors have made many improvements in style, organization, argument and content. These changes reflect advances in the bioethics literature over the past five years. The most dramatic expansions of the text are in the comprehensiveness with which the authors treat different currents in ethical theory and the greater breadth and depth of their discussion of public policy and public health issues. In every chapter, readers will find new (...)
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  7. Kerry Brace & Leon VandeCreek (1991). The Justification of Paternalistic Actions in Psychotherapy. Ethics and Behavior 1 (2):87 – 103.
    This article defines the nature of paternalistic interventions in psychotherapy and discusses reasons why the client's right to consent to treatment is important. We describe a reasoning process developed by Culver and Gert (1982) that can be used to determine when paternalistic actions are and are not ethically justifiable in mental health practice. We demonstrate how this procedure may be applied to psychotherapy by using a number of case illustrations.
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  8. Dan W. Brock (1985). Review Essay/a Case for Limited Paternalism. Criminal Justice Ethics 4 (2):79-88.
    John Kleinig, Paternalism Totowa, NJ: Rowman & Allanheld, 1984, xiii + 242 pp.
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  9. D. G. Brown (1989). More on Self-Enslavement and Paternalism in Mill. Utilitas 1 (1):144.
  10. Emma C. Bullock (2016). Mandatory Disclosure and Medical Paternalism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (2):409-424.
    Medical practitioners are duty-bound to tell their patients the truth about their medical conditions, along with the risks and benefits of proposed treatments. Some patients, however, would rather not receive medical information. A recent response to this tension has been to argue that that the disclosure of medical information is not optional. As such, patients do not have permission to refuse medical information. In this paper I argue that, depending on the context, the disclosure of medical information can undermine the (...)
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  11. Emma C. Bullock (2016). Knowing and Not‐Knowing For Your Own Good: The Limits of Epistemic Paternalism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2):n/a-n/a.
    Epistemic paternalism is the thesis that a paternalistic interference with an individual's inquiry is justified when it is likely to bring about an epistemic improvement in her. In this article I claim that in order to motivate epistemic paternalism we must first account for the value of epistemic improvements. I propose that the epistemic paternalist has two options: either epistemic improvements are valuable because they contribute to wellbeing, or they are epistemically valuable. I will argue that these options constitute the (...)
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  12. Stephen M. Campbell (2013). An Analysis of Prudential Value. Utilitas 25 (03):334-54.
    This essay introduces and defends a new analysis of prudential value. According to this analysis, what it is for something to be good for you is for that thing to contribute to the appeal or desirability of being in your position. I argue that this proposal fits well with our ways of talking about prudential value and well-being; enables promising analyses of the related concepts of luck, selfishness, self-sacrifice, and paternalism; preserves the relationship between prudential value and the attitudes of (...)
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  13. James F. Childress (1982). Who Should Decide?: Paternalism in Health Care. Oxford University Press.
    "A very good book indeed: there is scarcely an issue anyone has thought to raise about the topic which Childress fails to treat with sensitivity and good judgement....Future discussions of paternalism in health care will have to come to terms with the contentions of this book, which must be reckoned the best existing treatment of its subject."--Ethics. "A clear, scholarly and balanced analysis....This is a book I can recommend to physicians, ethicists, students of both fields, and to those most affected--the (...)
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  14. Michael Cholbi (forthcoming). Paternalism and Our Rational Powers. Mind.
    According to rational will views of paternalism, the wrongmaking feature of paternalism is that paternalists disregard or fail to respect the rational will of the paternalized, in effect substituting their own presumably superior judgments about what ends the paternalized ought to pursue or how they ought to pursue them. Here I defend a version of the rational will view appealing to three rational powers that constitute rational agency, which I call recognition, discrimination, and satisfaction. By appealing to these powers, my (...)
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  15. Michael Cholbi (2013). Kantian Paternalism and Suicide Intervention. In Christian Coons Michael Weber (ed.), Paternalism: Theory and Practice. Cambridge University Press
    Defends Kantian paternalism: Interference with an individual’s liberty for her own sake is justified absent her actual consent only to the extent that such interference stands a reasonable chance of preventing her from exercising her liberty irrationally in light of the rationally chosen ends that constitute her conception of the good. More specifically, interference with an individual’s liberty is permissible only if, by interfering, we stand a reasonable chance of preventing that agent from performing actions she chose due to distorted (...)
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  16. Simon Clarke (2003). Paternalism and Access to Medical Records. Journal of Information Ethics 12 (1):80-91.
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  17. Norman O. Dahl (1988). Review Essay / Against Legal Paternalism. Criminal Justice Ethics 7 (2):67-78.
    Joel Feinberg, Harm to Self Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986, xxiii + 412 pp.
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  18. Michael Davis (1999). Telling the Truth About Risk Assessments. Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (4):511-513.
  19. Ulrich Diehl (2003). Über die Würde der Kinder als Patienten. In C. Wiesemann, A. Dörries, G. Wolfslast & A. Simon (eds.), Das Kind als Patient. Campus
    In der Medizin gehören Kinder neben Ausländern, Behinderten und psychiatrisch Erkrankten zu den besonders vulnerablen Patientengruppen. Im Folgenden soll die Frage nach der Würde der Kinder in medizinethischer Hinsicht behandelt werden. Dazu werden drei Thesen erläutert und begründet: (1.) das Prinzip der Menschenwürde kann nicht ganz außer Acht gelassen werden, wenn Kinder als Patienten in medizinethischer Hinsicht thematisiert werden; (2.) das Prinzip der Menschenwürde wird in der Medizinethik nicht schon vollständig durch die medizinethischen Prinzipien der Patientenautonomie und der Fürsorge für (...)
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  20. Frank Dietrich (2009). Legalisierung der aktiven Sterbehilfe - Förderung oder Beeinträchtigung der individuellen Autonomie? Ethik in der Medizin 21 (4):275-288.
    Theorists who support the legalisation of active euthanasia usually base their arguments on the principle of autonomy. In their view the wish of a severely ill person not to continue his or her life must be respected. However, some opponents of the legalisation of active euthanasia refer to the principle of autonomy as well. They are concerned that patients may be held responsible for burdening others with the provision of care. Thus family members, physicians or nurses may exert pressure on (...)
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  21. Gerald Dworkin (1972). Paternalism. The Monist 56 (1):64-84.
  22. Anca Gheaus (2015). Unfinished Adults and Defective Children: On the Nature and Value of Childhood. Journal for Ethics and Social Philosophy 9 (1):1-21.
    Traditionally, most philosophers saw childhood as a state of deficiency and thought that its value was entirely dependent on how successfully it prepares individuals for adulthood. Yet, there are good reasons to think that childhood also has intrinsic value. Children possess certain intrinsically valuable abilities to a higher degree than adults. Moreover, going through a phase when one does not yet have a “self of one’s own,” and experimenting one’s way to a stable self, seems intrinsically valuable. I argue that (...)
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  23. Anca Gheaus (2014). The 'Intrinsic Goods of Childhood' and the Just Society. In Alexander Bagattini & Colin Macleod (eds.), The Nature of Children's Well-being: Theory and Practice. Springer
    I distinguish between three different ideas that have been recently discussed under the heading of 'the intrinsic goods of childhood': that childhood is itself intrinsically valuable, that certain goods are valuable only for children, and that children are being owed other goods than adults. I then briefly defend the claim the childhood is intrinsically good. Most of the chapter is dedicated to the analysis, and rejection, of the claim that certain goods are valuable only for children. This has implications about (...)
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  24. Kalle Grill & Jessica Fahlquist (2012). Responsibility, Paternalism and Alcohol Interlocks. Public Health Ethics 5 (2):116-127.
    Drink driving causes great suffering and material destruction. The alcohol interlock promises to eradicate this problem by technological design. Traditional counter-measures to drink driving such as policing and punishment and information campaigns have proven insufficient. Extensive policing is expensive and intrusive. Severe punishment is disproportionate to the risks created in most single cases. If the interlock becomes inexpensive and convenient enough, and if there are no convincing moral objections to the device, it may prove the only feasible as well as (...)
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  25. Daniel Groll (2014). Medical Paternalism – Part 2. Philosophy Compass 9 (3):194-203.
    Medical clinicians – doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners etc. – are charged to act for the good of their patients. But not all ways of acting for a patient's good are on par: some are paternalistic; others are not. What does it mean to act paternalistically, both in general and specifically in a medical context? And when, if ever, is it permissible for a clinician to act paternalistically? In Medical Paternalism Part 1, I answered the first question. This paper answers the (...)
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  26. Daniel Groll (2014). Medical Paternalism - Part 1. Philosophy Compass 9 (3):194-203.
    Medical clinicians – doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners etc. – are charged to act for the good of their patients. But not all ways of acting for a patient's good are on par: some are paternalistic; others are not. What does it mean to act paternalistically, both in general and specifically in a medical context? And when, if ever, is it permissible for a clinician to act paternalistically? -/- This paper deals with the first question, with a special focus on paternalism (...)
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  27. Daniel Groll (2012). Paternalism, Respect, and the Will. Ethics 122 (4):692-720.
    In general, we think that when it comes to the good of another, we respect that person’s will by acting in accordance with what he wills because he wills it. I argue that this is not necessarily true. When it comes to the good of another person, it is possible to disrespect that person’s will while acting in accordance with what he wills because he wills it. Seeing how this is so, I argue, enables us to clarify the distinct roles (...)
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  28. Pelle Guldborg Hansen (2012). Should We Be “Nudging” for Cadaveric Organ Donations? American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):46-48.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 46-48, February 2012.
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  29. Peter Hobson (1984). Another Look at Paternalism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (2):293-304.
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  30. Heidi Hurd (2009). Paternalism On Pain of Punishment. Criminal Justice Ethics 28 (1):49-73.
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  31. L. Syd M. Johnson (2015). Sport-Related Neurotrauma and Neuroprotection: Are Return-to-Play Protocols Justified by Paternalism? Neuroethics 8 (1):15-26.
    Sport-related neurotrauma annually affects millions of athletes worldwide. The return-to-play protocol is the dominant strategy adopted by sports leagues and organizations to manage one type of sport-related neurotrauma: concussions. RTPs establish guidelines for when athletes with concussions are to be removed from competition or practice, and when they can return. RTPs are intended to be neuroprotective, and to protect athletes from some of the harms of sport-related concussions, but there is athlete resistance to and noncompliance with RTPs. This prompts consideration (...)
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  32. Sandro Limentani (2002). From Paternalism to Managerialism. Philosophy of Management 2 (1):3-9.
    Traditionally, medical professionals have taken a paternalistic stance towards their patients and have relied on a traditional approach to medical ethics. In recent years, in Britain, however, a new 'managerialism' has developed in the National Health Service (the NHS). This stresses consumerism and greater patient choice and is changing the relationship between doctors and patients. This paper draws out the implications for patients. It describes the ethical characteristics of the two conflicting approaches and argues the need to stress again the (...)
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  33. Alex John London (2012). A Non-Paternalistic Model of Research Ethics and Oversight: Assessing the Benefits of Prospective Review. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 40 (4):930-944.
    This paper offers a non-paternalistic justification for prospective research review as providing a credible social assurance that the institutions of scientific advancement respect and affirm the moral equality of all community members and as creating a “market” in which stakeholders working to advance diverse ends also advance the common good.
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  34. S. Van McCrary & A. Terry Walman (1990). Procedural Paternalism in Competency Determination. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 18 (1-2):108-113.
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  35. J. -F. Menard (2010). A 'Nudge' for Public Health Ethics: Libertarian Paternalism as a Framework for Ethical Analysis of Public Health Interventions? Public Health Ethics 3 (3):229-238.
    Is it possible to interfere with individual decision-making while preserving freedom of choice? The purpose of this article is to assess whether ‘libertarian paternalism’, a set of political and ethical principles derived from the observations of behavioural sciences, can form the basis of a viable framework for the ethical analysis of public health interventions. First, the article situates libertarian libertarianism within the broader context of the law and economics movement. The main tenets of the approach are then presented and particular (...)
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  36. Michael S. Merry (2007). The Well-Being of Children, the Limits of Paternalism, and the State: Can Disparate Interests Be Reconciled? Ethics and Education 2 (1):39-59.
    For many, it is far from clear where the prerogatives of parents to educate as they deem appropriate end and the interests of their children, immediate or future, begin. In this article I consider the educational interests of children and argue that children have an interest in their own well-being. Following this, I will examine the interests of parents and consider where the limits of paternalism lie. Finally, I will consider the state's interest in the education of children and discuss (...)
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  37. Rick Momeyer (2000). Heavy Drinking on Campus and University Paternalism. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):147-151.
    Both for reasons of their own and because of congressionally mandated changes in the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, many colleges and universities have changed the way they deal with alcohol abuse by their students. One of these changes has been to adopt a policy of “Parental Notification” according to which parents of an underaged student found guilty of consuming alcohol are notified after a first offense. I argue that this is a paternalistic policy in need of justification, and (...)
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  38. Mark Munsterhjelm & Frederic Gilbert (2010). How Do Research Duties Conflict with Aboriginal Rights? Genetics Research and Biobank Problem in Taiwan. Dilemata 2 (4):33-56.
    Taiwan has a population of 23 million, of which some 500,000 are Aborigines. Recent conflicts over a national biobank as part of Taiwan's biotechnological industrial development, genetic research on Aboriginal origins, and commercialization of research findings involving Aborigines have raised a number of important ethical conflicts. These ethical conflicts involve on one hand, the importance of researchers' duties, and on the other hand, Aboriginal rights. This paper will go in three steps. First, this paper describes the three cases of ethical (...)
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  39. A. T. Nuyen (1983). Paternalism and Liberty. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (3):27-38.
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  40. Ayşe Begüm Ötken & Tuna Cenkci (2012). The Impact of Paternalistic Leadership on Ethical Climate: The Moderating Role of Trust in Leader. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (4):525 - 536.
    The purpose of this empirical study is to investigate the effect of paternalistic leadership (PL) on ethical climate and the moderating role of trust in leader. Convenience sampling is used as a sampling procedure and the data were obtained from 227 Turkish employees. The findings indicated that PL had some effect on ethical climate. Furthermore, partial support was found for the moderating effect of trust in leader on the relationship between PL and ethical climate. The results of the study showed (...)
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  41. Norbert Paulo (2015). The Bite of Rights in Paternalism. In Thomas Schramme (ed.), New Perspectives on Paternalism and Health Care. Springer International Publishing
    This paper scrutinizes the tension between individuals’ rights and paternalism. I will argue that no normative account that includes rights of individuals can justify hard paternalism since the infringement of a right can only be justified with the right or interest of another person, which is never the case in hard paternalism. Justifications of hard paternalistic actions generally include a deviation from the very idea of having rights. The paper first introduces Tom Beauchamp as the most famous contemporary hard paternalist (...)
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  42. Govind Persad (2014). Libertarian Patriarchalism: Nudges, Procedural Roadblocks, and Reproductive Choice. Women’s Rights L. Rep 35:273--466.
    Cass Sunstein and Richard Thaler's proposal that social and legal institutions should steer individuals toward some options and away from others-a stance they dub "libertarian paternalism"-has provoked much high-level discussion in both academic and policy settings. Sunstein and Thaler believe that steering, or "nudging," individuals is easier to justify than the bans or mandates that traditional paternalism involves. -/- This Article considers the connection between libertarian paternalism and the regulation of reproductive choice. I first discuss the use of nudges to (...)
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  43. Elizabeth Prior Jonson, Margaret Lindorff & Linda McGuire (2012). Paternalism and the Pokies: Unjustified State Interference or Justifiable Intervention? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):259-268.
    The Australian Productivity Commission and a Joint Select Committee on Gambling Reform have recommended implementation of a mandatory pre-commitment system for electronic gambling. Organizations associated with the gambling industry have protested that such interventions reduce individual rights, and will cause a reduction in revenue which will cost jobs and reduce gaming venue support for local communities. This article is not concerned with the design details or the evidence base of the proposed scheme, but rather with the fundamental criticism that a (...)
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  44. Laura Purdy (1992). In Their Best Interest? The Case Against Equal Rights for Children. Cornell University Press.
    Proponents of children's liberation (CL) argue that there are no morally relevant differences between children and adults. Consequently, special protective laws that limit children's freedom are unjustified, and should be abolished. Protectionists reject the premise of this argument, and hence also the conclusion. Proponents of CL mostly fix upon the capacity for instrumental reasoning as the criterion that should separate autonomous from non-autonomous individuals. I argue that most children are substantially worse at instrumental reasoning than most adults, and although drawing (...)
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  45. Linda Radzik (2014). Uncertainty in Everyday Life. The Philosophers' Magazine 66:77-83.
    What should a bystander do when she witnesses something that may be morally problematic, but also may not be?
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  46. Gerry Roche (2012). A Philosophical Investigation Into Coercive Psychiatric practices_Vol 2. Dissertation, University of Limerick
    This dissertation seeks to examine the validity of the justification commonly offered for a coercive (1) psychiatric intervention, namely that the intervention was in the ‘best interests’ of the subject and/or that the subject posed a danger to others. As a first step,it was decided to analyse justifications based on ‘best interests’ [the ‘Stage 1’ argument] separately from those based on dangerousness [the ‘Stage 2’ argument]. Justifications based on both were the focus of the ‘Stage 3’ argument. Legal and philosophical (...)
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  47. Mark Sagoff (1984). Paternalism and the Regulation of Drugs. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (2):43-57.
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  48. Thomas Schramme (2014). Maximierungsgebot Und Die Grenzen der Moral - Im Allgemeinen Und Bei John Stuart Mill Im Besonderen. In Michael Kühler & Alexa Nossek (eds.), Paternalismus und Konsequentialismus. Mentis 151-160.
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  49. Thomas Schramme (2013). Paternalismus, Zwang Und Manipulation in der Psychatrie. In Johann Ach (ed.), Grenzen der Selbstbestimmung in der Medizin. Mentis 263-281.
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  50. Thomas Schramme (2012). Paternalism, Coercion and Manipulation in Psychiatry. In Jan Joerden (ed.), Menschenwürde in der Medizin: Quo Vadis? Nomos 147-160.
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