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  1. Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij (2013). Epistemic Paternalism: A Defence. Palgrave Macmillan.
    We know that we are fallible creatures, liable to cognitive bias. But we also have a strong and stubborn tendency to overestimate our reasoning capacities. This presents a problem for any attempt to help us reason in more accurate ways: While we might see the point of others heeding intellectual advice and relying on reasoning aids, each and every one of us will tend not to see the point of doing so ourselves. The present book argues that the solution to (...)
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  2. Joel Anderson (forthcoming). Autonomy Gaps as a Social Pathology: Ideologiekritik Beyond Paternalism. In Rainer Forst (ed.), Sozialphilosophie und Kritik. Suhrkamp.
    From the outset, critical social theory has sought to diagnose people’s participation in their own oppression, by revealing the roots of irrational and self-undermining choices in the complex interplay between human nature, social structures, and cultural beliefs. As part of this project, Ideologiekritik has aimed to expose faulty conceptions of this interplay, so that the objectively pathological character of what people are “freely” choosing could come more clearly into view. The challenge, however, has always been to find a way of (...)
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  3. Richard Baron (2006). Ethics in Government. Philosophy Now 54:34-37.
    This article considers the application of utilitarian and deontological theories to questions that arise in the conduct of government, including whether a government may mislead the public without actually lying, how far civil servants should maintain political neutrality, whether civil servants should leak information to the press, and whether a government should avoid getting legal advice that it might not like.
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  4. Ernest John Pickstone Benn (1936). Modern Government "as a Busybody in Other Men's Matters". London, G. Allen & Unwin Ltd..
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  5. Yvonne Chiu & Robert S. Taylor (2011). The Self-Extinguishing Despot: Millian Democratization, or The Autophagous Autocrat. Journal of Politics 73 (4):1239-50.
    Although there is no more iconic, stalwart, and eloquent defender of liberty and representative democracy than J.S. Mill, he sometimes endorses non-democratic forms of governance. This article explains the reasons behind this seeming aberration and shows that Mill actually has complex and nuanced views of the transition from non-democratic to democratic government, including the comprehensive and parallel material, cultural, institutional, and character reforms that must occur, and the mechanism by which they will be enacted. Namely, an enlightened despot must cultivate (...)
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  6. Barbara Cruikshank (2014). Disciplining the Poor: Neoliberal Paternalism and the Persistent Power of Race. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (1):e1.
  7. Shui Che Fok (1997). Political Change in Hong Kong and its Implications for Civic Education. Journal of Moral Education 26 (1):85-99.
    Abstract In political culture, Hong Kong has undergone dramatic changes in recent decades. When Hong Kong was a British colony, its people were largely concerned to maintain the status quo so that they could be left alone; the ideal government was perceived as a paternalistic one which would maintain law and order. With their increasing involvement in political parties and pressure groups, more Hong Kong people are prepared to fight for their rights and demand ?freedom and democracy?; they want a (...)
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  8. Rainer Forst (ed.) (2009). Sozialphilosophie Und Kritik. Suhrkamp.
  9. Kalle Grill (2010). Anti-Paternalism and Invalidation of Reasons. Public Reason 2 (2):3-20.
    I first provide an analysis of Joel Feinberg’s anti-paternalism in terms of invalidation of reasons. Invalidation is the blocking of reasons from influencing the moral status of actions, in this case the blocking of personal good reasons from supporting liberty-limiting actions. Invalidation is shown to be distinct from moral side constraints and lexical ordering of values and reasons. I then go on to argue that anti-paternalism as invalidation is morally unreasonable on at least four grounds, none of which presuppose that (...)
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  10. Adam Hosein (forthcoming). Democracy, Paternalism, and Campaign Finance. Public Affairs Quarterly.
  11. Peter De Marneffe (2006). Avoiding Paternalism. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (1):68 - 94.
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  12. Elizabeth Prior Jonson, Margaret Lindorff & Linda McGuire (2012). Paternalism and the Pokies: Unjustified State Interference or Justifiable Intervention? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):259-268.
    The Australian Productivity Commission and a Joint Select Committee on Gambling Reform have recommended implementation of a mandatory pre-commitment system for electronic gambling. Organizations associated with the gambling industry have protested that such interventions reduce individual rights, and will cause a reduction in revenue which will cost jobs and reduce gaming venue support for local communities. This article is not concerned with the design details or the evidence base of the proposed scheme, but rather with the fundamental criticism that a (...)
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  13. Jonathan Riley (1985). Liberty, Paternalism and Justice. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 7:161-175.
  14. Marion Smiley (1989). Case Study: Liberty and Paternalism. In Amy Gutmann and Dennis Thompson (ed.), Ethics and Politics. Harvard University Press.
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  15. Marion Smiley (1989). Paternalism and Democracy. Journal of Value Inquiry 23 (4):299-318.
    This essay argues that Dworkin, Feinberg and others who claim exceptions against the principle of paternalism for the sake of preventing seroius physical harm are forced to treat mature adults as mental incompetents and that they are forced to do so by the prevailing concept of paternalism itself. The essay then shows how we can get around this dilemma by re-thinking paternalism as part of distinctly paternal relationships of domination and inequality.
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  16. Avrum Stroll (1967). Censorship, Models and Self-Government. Journal of Value Inquiry 1 (2):81-95.
  17. Jeremy Waldron (1981). A Right to Do Wrong. Ethics 92 (1):21-39.
  18. Mark D. White (2010). Behavioral Law and Economics : The Assault on Consent, Will, and Dignity. In Christi Favor, Gerald F. Gaus & Julian Lamont (eds.), Essays on Philosophy, Politics & Economics: Integration & Common Research Projects. Stanford Economics and Finance.
    In "Behavioral Law and Economics: The Assault on Consent, Will, and Dignity," Mark D. White uses the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant to examine the intersection of economics, psychology, and law known as "behavioral law and economics." Scholars in this relatively new field claim that, because of various cognitive biases and failures, people often make choices that are not in their own interests. The policy implications of this are that public and private organizations, such as the state and employers, can (...)
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  19. Daniel Wikler (1979). Paternalism and the Mildly Retarded. Philosophy and Public Affairs 8 (4):377-392.
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