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Perception

Edited by Benj Hellie (University of Toronto, University of Toronto at Scarborough)
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  1. André J. Abath (2012). Brewer's Switching Argument. Grazer Philosophische Studien 85 (1):255-277.
    In his Perception and Reason, Bill Brewer argues that one can only have empirical beliefs if one’s perceptual experiences serve as reasons for such beliefs. His argument for this idea relies on a premise according to which in order for the relations with perceptual experience to determine the contents of empirical beliefs, these relations must be reason-giving. He offers an argument for this premise, the so-called Switching Argument. In this paper, I show that the Switching Argument does not work, in (...)
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  2. Andre J. Abath (2008). A Note on McDowell's Response to the Fineness of Grain Argument. Dialogue 47 (3/4):677-686.
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  3. Malcolm Acock (1985). Vision: A Computational Investigation Into the Human Representation and Processing of Visual Information. By David Marr. The Modern Schoolman 62 (2):141-142.
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  4. George P. Adams (1915). The Mind's Knowledge of Reality. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 12 (3):57-66.
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  5. Alain (2006). Cours de Philosophie: Rouen, 1900-1901. Institut Alain.
    Les degrés et les formes de la vie pensante -- Théorie de la connaissance -- La perception -- L'imagination.
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  6. Peter Alexander (1963/1992). Sensationalism And Scientific Explanation. Humanities Press.
    SENSATIONALISM 1 1. Introductory 1 2. Mach's Sensationalism 4 3. Developments of Sensationalism 22 II. THE INHERENT WEAKNESS OF SEN- SATIONALISM 25 1. The Point of Sensationalism 25 2. The Ambiguity of 'Sensation' 27 3. The Fundamental Conflict 35 4. Mistakes, Incorrigibility and Simplicity 40 III. DESCRIPTION 51 1. Describing and Descriptions 51 2. Describing in Terms of Sensations 67 IV. THE POSSIBILITY OF 'PURE' DES- CRIPTIONS 79 V. SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS 99 VI. DESCRIPTIONS AND EXPLANATIONS 111 BIBLIOGRAPHY 142 INDEX 145 (...)
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  7. Grant Allen (1878). Development of the Sense of Colour. Mind 3 (9):129-132.
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  8. William P. Alston (1999). Back to the Theory of Appearing. Philosophical Perspectives 13 (s13):181--203.
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  9. Ulrich Ansorge, Ingrid Scharlau, Manfred Heumann & Werner Klotz (2001). Visual Conscious Perception Could Be Grounded in a Nonconscious Sensorimotor Domain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):974-975.
    Visual conscious perception could be grounded in a nonconscious sensorimotor domain. Although invisible, information can be processed up to the level of response activation. Moreover, these nonconscious processes are modified by actual intentions. This notion bridges a gap in the theoretical framework of O'Regan & Noë.
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  10. István Aranyosi (2008). Seeing Dark Things. The Philosophy of Shadows. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (3):513-515.
    Roy Sorensen’s adventure in Shadowland started with his prize-winning article, "Seeing Intersecting Eclipses" (published in The Journal of Philosophy, and chosen by the board of the Philosopher’s Annual as one of the ten best philosophy articles of 1999), which is the basis for the first two chapters in this book. The recipe adopted in that article is followed in most of the following thirteen chapters, five of them being based on Sorensen’s previous articles on the topic: start with an open (...)
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  11. Felix Arnold (1906). The Given Situation in Attention. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 3 (21):567-573.
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  12. Bryan Baird (2006). The Transcendental Nature of Mind and World. Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):381-398.
    Critics of John McDowell’s Mind and World have by and large failed to take sufficient notice of the transcendental context within whichMcDowell situates his work—a failure that has adversely affected their criticisms. In this paper, I make clear this transcendental context and show how it figures in the transcendental argument I see McDowell offering in Mind and World. Interpreting McDowell’s argument in this way, I further argue, helps to answer some of the most pressing objections to what he is doing (...)
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  13. Michael Barber (2007). Radical Reflection: Brandom and McDowell on Perception. The Modern Schoolman 84 (2-3):245-265.
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  14. Horace Barlow (2006). Seeing, Doing and Knowing: Mohan Matthan (2005). Seeing, Doing and Knowing: A Philosophical Theory of Sense Perception. Clarendon Press, Oxford. Hardback. 362 Pp. ISBN 0‐19‐926850‐9. [REVIEW] Bioessays 28 (10):1056-1059.
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  15. Philip J. Benson (1998). Seeing Wood Because of the Trees? A Case of Failure in Reverse-Engineering. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):468-468.
    Failure to take note of distinctive attributes in the distal stimulus leads to an inadequate proximal encoding. Representation of similarities in Chorus suffers in this regard. Distinctive qualities may require additional complex representation (e.g., reference to linguistic terms) in order to facilitate discrimination. Additional semantic information, which configures proximal attributes, permits accurate identification of true veridical stimuli.
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  16. Jacob Berger (2013). Perceptual Justification Outside of Consciousness. In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Springer. 137-145.
    In his (2011) paper “There It Is” and his (2014) précis “There It Was,” Benj Hellie develops a sophisticated semantics for perceptual justification according to which perceptions in good cases can be explained by intentional psychology and can justify beliefs, whereas bad cases of perception are defective and so cannot justify beliefs. Importantly, Hellie also affords consciousness a central role in rationality insofar as only those good cases of perception within consciousness can play a justificatory function. In this commentary, I (...)
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  17. Michael P. Berman (2006). The World of Perception. Dialogue 45 (2):410-414.
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  18. Ronald Bogue (2009). The Landscape of Sensation. In Eugene W. Holland, Daniel W. Smith & Charles J. Stivale (eds.), Gilles Deleuze: Image and Text. Continuum.
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  19. Nick Bostrom, Cortical Integration: Possible Solutions to the Binding and Linking Problems in Perception, Reasoning and Long Term Memory.
    The problem of cortical integration is described and various proposed solutions, including grandmother cells, cell assemblies, feed-forward structures, RAAM and synchronization, are reviewed. One method, involving complex attractors, that has received little attention in the literature, is explained and developed. I call this binding through annexation. A simulation study is then presented which suggests ways in which complex attractors could underlie our capacity to reason. The paper ends with a discussion of the efficiency and biological plausibility of the proposals as (...)
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  20. Philip Bourdillon (1975). Thomas Reid's Account of Sensation as a Natural Principle of Belief. Philosophical Studies 27 (1):19 - 36.
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  21. Patrick Bourgeois (1990). Sensation, Perception and Immediacy. Southwest Philosophy Review 6 (1):105-111.
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  22. F. H. Bradley (1893/1969). Appearance and Reality. Clarendon Press.
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  23. Raymond Trevor Bradley (2007). The Psychophysiology of Intuition: A Quantum-Holographic Theory of Nonlocal Communication. World Futures 63 (2):61 – 97.
    This work seeks to explain intuitive perception - those perceptions that are not based on reason or logic or on memories or extrapolations from the past, but are based, instead, on accurate foreknowledge of the future. Often such intuitive foreknowledge involves perception of implicit information about nonlocal objects and/or events by the body's psychophysiological systems. Recent experiments have shown that intuitive perception of a future event is related to the degree of emotional significance of that event, and a new study (...)
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  24. Susan Bredlau (2011). Monstrous Faces and a World Transformed: Merleau-Ponty, Dolezal, and the Enactive Approach on Vision Without Inversion of the Retinal Image. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):481-498.
    The world perceived by a person undergoing vision without inversion of the retinal image has traditionally been described as inverted. Drawing on the philosophical work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and the empirical research of Hubert Dolezal, I argue that this description is more reflective of a representationist conception of vision than of actual visual experience. The world initially perceived in vision without inversion of the retinal image is better described as lacking in lived significance rather than inverted; vision without inversion of (...)
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  25. Bill Brewer (2011). Perception and Its Objects. Oxford University Press.
    Early modern empiricists thought that the nature of perceptual experience is given by citing the object presented to the mind in that experience. Hallucination and illusion suggest that this requires untenable mind-dependent objects. Current orthodoxy replaces the appeal to direct objects with the claim that perceptual experience is characterized instead by its representational content. This paper argues that the move to content is problematic, and reclaims the early modern empiricist insight as perfectly consistent, even in cases of illusion, with the (...)
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  26. Bill Brewer (2011). Realism and Explanation in Perception. In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford University Press.
    Suppose that wc identify physical objccts, in thc first instance, by extension, as things like stones, tables, trees, people and other animals: the persisting macroscopic constituents of the world in which we live. Of course, there is a substantive question of what it is to be y such things in the way relevant to categorization as a physical object. So this can hardly be the final word on the matter. Still, it is equally clear that this gives us all a (...)
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  27. Bill Brewer (2008). How to Account for Illusion. In Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Disjunctivism: Perception, Action, Knowledge. Oxford University Press. 168-180.
    The question how to account for illusion has had a prominent role in shaping theories of perception throughout the history of philosophy. Prevailing philosophical wisdom today has it that phenomena of illusion force us to choose between the following two options. First, reject altogether the early modern empiricist idea that the core subjective character of perceptual experience is to be given simply by citing the object presented in that experience. Instead we must characterize perceptual experience entirely in terms of its (...)
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  28. C. D. Broad (1914/1972). Perception, Physics, and Reality. New York,Russell & Russell.
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  29. A. A. Broyles (1984). Quantum Mechanics of Seeing. Foundations of Physics 14 (6):553-560.
    A human being viewing a defocused television tube with sweep voltages turned off will see point scintillations at sufficiently low intensities. We show that quantum mechanics predicts these scintillations. Furthermore, by assuming a response of the human nervous system of a type not inconsistent with experiment, measurement theory is used to show that these scintillations will be distributed in proportion to the magnitude squared of the electron wave function incident upon the television tube screen. This nervous system response is to (...)
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  30. Otmar Bucher (2011). Kopfwelten: Was Ist Wahr an Unserer Wahrnehmung? Verlag Neue Zürcher Zeitung.
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  31. Malcolm Budd (2012). The Musical Expression of Emotion: Metaphorical-As Versus Imaginative-As Perception. Estetika 49 (2):131-147.
    The paper begins with an overview of various well-known accounts of the musical expression of emotion that have been proposed in recent years. But rather than proceeding to assess the merits and faults of these accounts the paper examines whether a radically new theory by Christopher Peacocke is superior to all of them. The theory, which certainly has a number of attractive features, is based on the idea of metaphorical-as perception. The notion of metaphorical-as perception needs to be elucidated and (...)
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  32. Tyler Burge (2010). Origins of Objectivity. OUP Oxford.
    Tyler Burge presents a substantial, original study of what it is for individuals to represent the physical world with the most primitive sort of objectivity. By reflecting on the science of perception and related psychological and biological sciences, he gives an account of constitutive conditions for perceiving the physical world, and thus aims to locate origins of representational mind. Origins of Objectivity illuminates several long-standing, central issues in philosophy, and provides a wide-ranging account of relations between human and animal psychologies.
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  33. Tyler Burge (2009). Perceptual Objectivity. Philosophical Review 118 (3):285-324.
    A central preoccupation of philosophy in the twentieth century was to determine constitutive conditions under which accurate (objective) empirical representation of the macrophysical environment is possible. A view that dominated attitudes on this project maintained that an individual cannot empirically represent a physical subject matter as having specific physical characteristics unless the individual can represent some constitutive conditions under which such representation is possible. The version of this view that dominated the century's second half maintained that objective empirical representation of (...)
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  34. Ian Burkitt (2013). Self and Others in the Field of Perception: The Role of Micro-Dialogue, Feeling, and Emotion in Perception. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 33 (4):267.
  35. Matthew Burstein (2007). Taking As: Experience & Judgment in the Life of Agents. Philosophical Explorations 10 (3):227 – 243.
    Although appearances may deceive them, agents are capable of achieving their ends; this success is frequently explained by the fact that the agents may, for example, see a stick in water as bent without believing that it is actually bent. Although the notion of 'seeing as' is supposed to both bridge the gap between experience and action and explain our reaction to illusions, such accounts break down because of their exclusive focus on visual episodes and their tendency to interpret the (...)
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  36. A. Byrne (2011). Seeing, Doing, and Knowing: A Philosophical Theory of Sense Perception, by Mohan Matthen. Mind 119 (476):1206-1210.
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  37. Alex Byrne (1998). Dennett Versus Gibson. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):751-752.
    Pessoa et al. misinterpret some of Dennett's discussion of filling-in. Their argument against the representational conception of vision and for a Gibsonian alternative is also flawed.
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  38. Alex Byrne & David Hilbert (eds.) (1997). Readings on Color I: The Philosophy of Color. The Mit Press.
    Edward Wilson Averill By the phrase 'anthropocentric account of color' I mean an account of color that makes an assumption of the following form: two ...
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  39. Alex Byrne & David R. Hilbert (2008). Basic Sensible Qualities and the Structure of Appearance. Philosophical Issues 18 (1):385-405.
    A sensible quality is a perceptible property, a property that physical objects (or events) perceptually appear to have. Thus smells, tastes, colors and shapes are sensible qualities. An egg, for example, may smell rotten, taste sour, and look cream and round.1,2 The sensible qualities are not a miscellanous jumble—they form complex structures. Crimson, magenta, and chartreuse are not merely three different shades of color: the first two are more similar than either is to the third. Familiar color spaces or color (...)
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  40. Alex Byrne & Heather Logue (eds.) (2009). Disjunctivism: Contemporary Readings. MIT Press.
    Classic texts that define the disjunctivist theory of perception.
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  41. Alex Byrne & Heather Logue (2008). Either/Or. In Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Disjunctivism: Perception, Action, Knowledge. Oxford University Press. 314-19.
    This essay surveys the varieties of disjunctivism about perceptual experience. Disjunctivism comes in two main flavours, metaphysical and epistemological.
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  42. Clotilde Calabi (2009). Filosofia Della Percezione. Laterza.
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  43. John Campbell, 1. Acquaintance Vs. Knowledge of Truths.
    Suppose your conscious life were surgically excised, but everything else left intact, what would you miss? In this situation you would not have the slightest idea what was going on. You would have no idea what there is in the world around you; what the grounds are of the potentialities and threats are that you are negotiating. Experience of your surroundings provides you with knowledge of what is there: with your initial base of knowledge of what the things are that (...)
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  44. John Campbell, Philosophical Lecture.
    Ir IS winmx HELD that the capacity for spatial thought depends upon the ability to refer to physical things. The argument is that the identification of places depends upon the identification of things; places in themselves are all very much alike and can be distinguished only by their spatial relations to things. So one could not so much as think about places unless one could think about things (Strawson, 1959). It has to be acknowledged that our identifications of places are (...)
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  45. John Campbell (2011). Relational Vs Kantian Responses to Berkeley's Puzzle. In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford University Press.
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  46. John Campbell (2011). Tyler Burge: Origins of Objectivity. Journal of Philosophy 108 (5).
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  47. John Campbell (2009). Does Knowledge of Material Objects Depend on Spatial Perception? Comments on Quassim Cassam's the Possibility of Knowledge. Analysis 69 (2):309-317.
  48. John Campbell (2007). The Metaphysics of Perception. Philosophical Issues 17 (1):1–15.
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  49. William W. Carlile (1912). Perception and Intersubjective Intercourse. Mind 21 (84):508-521.
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  50. Edward C. Carterette (1974). Historical and Philosophical Roots of Perception. New York,Academic Press.
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1 — 50 / 5279