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  1. Keith Abney (2009). Review of The Case Against Perfection. [REVIEW] Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (3).
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  2. Ludvig Beckman (2001). The Liberal State & the Politics of Virtue. Transaction Publishers.
    In this volume, schematically divided into two parts, Ludvig Beckman challenges the common view that support for the good life, the politics of virtue, is in ...
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  3. Kimberley Brownlee (2010). Moral Aspirations and Ideals. Utilitas 22 (3):241-257.
    My aim is to vindicate two distinct and important moral categories – ideals and aspirations – which have received modest, and sometimes negative, attention in recent normative debates. An ideal is a conception of perfection or model of excellence around which we can shape our thoughts and actions. An aspiration, by contrast, is an attitudinal position of steadfast commitment to, striving for, or deep desire or longing for, an ideal. I locate these two concepts in relation to more familiar moral (...)
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  4. Joseph Chan (2012). Political Authority and Perfectionism: A Response to Quong. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  5. Joseph Chan (2000). Legitimacy, Unanimity, and Perfectionism. Philosophy and Public Affairs 29 (1):5–42.
  6. Yvonne Chiu & Robert S. Taylor (2011). The Self-Extinguishing Despot: Millian Democratization, or The Autophagous Autocrat. Journal of Politics 73 (4):1239-50.
    Although there is no more iconic, stalwart, and eloquent defender of liberty and representative democracy than J.S. Mill, he sometimes endorses non-democratic forms of governance. This article explains the reasons behind this seeming aberration and shows that Mill actually has complex and nuanced views of the transition from non-democratic to democratic government, including the comprehensive and parallel material, cultural, institutional, and character reforms that must occur, and the mechanism by which they will be enacted. Namely, an enlightened despot must cultivate (...)
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  7. Michael Clark (1993). On Wanting to Be Morally Perfect. Analysis 53 (1):54 - 56.
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  8. L. S. D. (1980). Equality, Liberty, and Perfectionism. Review of Metaphysics 34 (2):378-380.
  9. Pergiorgio Donatelli (2006). Mill's Perfectionism. Prolegomena 5 (2):149-164.
    J. S. Mill lays great emphasis on the importance of the notion of the individual as a progressive being. The idea that we need to conceive the self as an object of cultivation and perfection runs through Mill’s writings on various topics, and has played a certain role in recent interpretations. In this paper I propose a specific interpretation of Mill’s understanding of the self, along the lines of what Stanley Cavell identifies as a “perfectionist” concern for the self. Various (...)
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  10. Piergiorgio Donatelli (2006). Bringing Truth Home : Mill, Wittgenstein, Cavell, and Moral Perfectionism. In Andrew John Norris (ed.), The Claim to Community: Essays on Stanley Cavell and Political Philosophy. Stanford University Press.
  11. Terence Rajivan Edward, The Asymmetry Objection to Political Liberalism: Evaluation of a Defence.
    This paper evaluates Jonathan Quong’s attempt to defend a version of political liberalism from the asymmetry objection. I object that Quong’s defence relies on a premise that has not been adequately supported and does not look as if it can be given adequate support.
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  12. M. Fox & D. Ward (1992). Multiculturalism, Liberalism, and Science. Inquiry 10 (4):3-6.
  13. Facundo García Valverde (2007). Garreta Leclercq, Mariano; Legitimidad Política y Neutralidad Estatal. Buenos Aires, 2007, Eudeba [Reseña]. Análisis Filosófico 27 (2):221-226.
    Legitimidad política y neutralidad estatal puede ser considerado como un intento de responder a la pregunta que un defensor de una doctrina comprehensiva religiosa, filosófica o de la buena vida, podría realizarle a un Estado liberal: ¿por qué debo aceptar que las decisiones sobre políticas públicas se justifiquen por valores neutrales y no por los de la doctrina a la cual adhiero, los cuales considero como verdaderos y correctos? La importancia de una respuesta adecuada radica en que, de acuerdo con (...)
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  14. Mariano Garreta Leclercq (2007). Legitimidad Política y Neutralidad Estatal: Sobre Los Fundamentos Del Liberalismo. Eudeba.
    El debate entre liberalismo y perfeccionismo ha sido uno de los ejes centrales de la Filosofía política durante los últimos veinte años. Este libro aspira a analizar críticamente y, en última instancia, a ofrecer una defensa del núcleo conceptual de la posicíon liberal. A lo largo del trabajo, se examina y discute una amplia serie de argumentos propuestos por filósofos contemporáneos "Rawls, Larmore, Barry, Kymlicka, Nagel y Ackerman, entre otros" en defensa de la neutralidad estatal. A su vez, se desarrollan (...)
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  15. John Horton (2012). Why Liberals Should Not Worry About Subsidizing Opera. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (4):429-448.
    Peter Jones has consistently defended the position that liberalism must maintain the distinction between the right and the good if it is to be qualitatively different from alternative political theories, and thus resist the charge that liberals are just like any other political theorists in wanting to impose their views on others. In this paper, I not only add my voice to the many who have already challenged the viability of that distinction, but also additionally argue that it is both (...)
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  16. Franz Fan-lun Mang (2013). Liberal Neutrality and Moderate Perfectionism. Res Publica 19 (4):297-315.
    This article defends a moderate version of state perfectionism by using Gerald Gaus’s argument for liberal neutrality as a starting point of discussion. Many liberal neutralists reject perfectionism on the grounds of respect for persons, but Gaus has explained more clearly than most neutralists how respect for persons justifies neutrality. Against neutralists, I first argue that the state may promote the good life by appealing to what can be called “the qualified judgments about the good life,” which have not been (...)
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  17. Thaddeus Metz (2014). Gross National Happiness: A Philosophical Appraisal. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (3):218-232.
    For more than 40 years, the Kingdom of Bhutan has eschewed evaluating its socio-economic status in terms of Gross Domestic Product and has instead done so under the heading of ‘Gross National Happiness’. As part of the upswing in international interest in well-being as the proper final end of development, it would be apt to critically explore the approach that has been in use for several decades. In this article I expound the central elements of Gross National Happiness and discuss (...)
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  18. Thaddeus Metz (2004). Open Perfectionism and Global Justice. Theoria 51 (104):96-127.
    In his book Cosmopolitan Justice, Darrel Moellendorf argues that respect for persons has the following rough implications (among others): requires states to enact liberal legislation; permits them to interfere with religious or otherwise perfectionist regimes; forbids them from restricting immigration for perfectionist ends; and requires them to permit secession. In this article, I do not question Moellendorf's Kantian foundation; what I do here is question the inferences from this principle to the above conclusions. My basic strategy involves drawing a distinction (...)
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  19. Thaddeus Metz (2001). Respect for Persons and Perfectionist Politics. Philosophy and Public Affairs 30 (4):417–442.
    Can a state seek to promote a thick conception of the good (such as fostering a kind of meaning or excellence in people's lives) without treating its citizens disrespectfully? The predominant answer among friends of the principle of respect for persons is "no." The most powerful Kantian objection to non-liberalism or perfectionism is the claim that citizens who do not share the state's conception of the good would be wronged in that the state would treat a certain way of life (...)
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  20. Stephen Mulhall (1994). Perfectionism, Politics and the Social Contract: Rawls and Cavell on Justice. Journal of Political Philosophy 2 (3):222–239.
  21. Alan Patten (2003). Liberal Neutrality and Language Policy. Philosophy and Public Affairs 31 (4):356–386.
  22. Robert S. Taylor (2014). Illiberal Socialism. Social Theory and Practice 40 (3):433-460.
    Is “liberal socialism” an oxymoron? Not quite, but I will demonstrate here that it is a much more unstable and uncommon hybrid than scholars had previously thought and that almost all liberals should reject socialism, even in its most attractive form. More specifically, I will show that three leading varieties of liberalism—neutralist, plural-perfectionist, and deliberative-democratic—are incompatible with even a moderate form of socialism, viz., associational market socialism. My paper will also cast grave doubt on Rawls’s belief that justice as fairness (...)
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