This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
66 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 66
  1. R. I. Aaron (1938). How Many Phenomenalism Be Refuted? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 39:167 - 184.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. E. M. Adams (1959). The Inadequacy of Phenomenalism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 20 (1):93-102.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Robert Merrihew Adams (1983). Phenomenalism and Corporeal Substance in Leibniz. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 8 (1):217-257.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. H. B. Alexander (1905). Phenomenalism and the Problem of Knowledge. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 2 (7):182-187.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. James Andrews (1874). The Psychology of Scepticism and Phenomenalism.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Richard E. Aquila (1975). Kant's Phenomenalism. Idealistic Studies 5 (2):108-126.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. A. J. Ayer (1946). Phenomenalism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 47:163 - 196.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. E. Barkin (2003). Relative Phenomenalism - Toward a More Plausible Theory of Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (8):3-13.
    Most philosophers believe that qualitative states must be explained in terms of physical states of the brain in order to resolve the mind/ body problem. But the severe difficulties involved in deriving the mental from the physical or, even more bizarrely, eliminating the mental altogether, have caused some to seriously investigate Russell's longstanding ideas about the intrinsic nature of physical entities. The resulting microphenomenal approaches, however, are of necessity extremely vague and complicated. Consequently, a macrophenomenal theory of mind may well (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Monroe C. Beardsley (1942). Phenomenalism and Determinism. Journal of Philosophy 39 (26):711-717.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.) (2005). Truthmakers: The Contemporary Debate. Clarendon.
    This volume will be the starting point for future discussion and research.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. M. Black (1939). Comments on a Recent Version of Phenomenalism. Analysis 7 (1):1 - 12.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. John Bolender (1998). Factual Phenomenalism: A Supervenience Theory. Sorites 9 (9):16-31.
    Broadly speaking, phenomenalism is the position that physical facts depend upon sensory facts. Many have thought it to imply that physical statements are translatable into sensory statements. Not surprisingly, the impossibility of such translations led many to abandon phenomenalism in favor of materialism. But this was rash, for if phenomenalism is reformulated as the claim that physical facts supervene upon sensory facts, then translatability is no longer required. Given materialism's failure to account for subjective experience, there has been a revival (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Archibald A. Bowman (1916). Kant's Phenomenalism in its Relation to Subsequent Metaphysics. Mind 25 (100):461-489.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. F. H. Bradley (1900). A Defence of Phenomenalism in Psychology. Mind 9 (33):26-45.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Robert Brandom (1988). Pragmatism, Phenomenalism, and Truth Talk. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 12 (1):75-93.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. C. D. Broad (1914). Phenomenalism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 15:227 - 251.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Gregory Brown (1987). God's Phenomena and the Pre-Established Harmony. Studia Leibnitiana 19 (2):200-214.
    In this paper I wish to examine the nature and role of "the phenomena of God" in Leinbiz's mature thought. In the first part of the paper, I discuss the nature of the universal harmony and argue that they are the perceptiual states of finite substances and the relations among them that constitute God's phenomena. In the second part of the paper, I attempt to specify the theoretical role that God's phenomena play in Leibniz's phenomenalism. This leads finally to a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Robert Brown & John Watling (1949). Hypothetical Statements in Phenomenalism. Synthese 8 (1):355 - 366.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Hector Neri Castaneda (1961). Professor Bar-Hillel on Nonformal Implications and Phenomenalism. Philosophical Studies 12 (6):85 - 90.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Mark Thomas Coppenger (1974). A Defense of Phenomenalism. Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. James W. Cornman (1973). Theoretical Phenomenalism. Noûs 7 (2):120-138.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. J. W. Davis (1962). Berkeley and Phenomenalism. Dialogue 1 (01):67-80.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. F. C. Doan (1905). Phenomenalism in Ethics. Mind 14 (54):221-234.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. John J. Drummond (1980). A Critique of Gurwitsch's “Phenomenological Phenomenalism”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):9-21.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Steven French & James Ladyman (2003). Between Platonism and Phenomenalism: Reply to Cao. Synthese 136 (1):73-78.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Steven French & James Ladyman (2003). The Dissolution of Objects: Between Platonism and Phenomenalism. [REVIEW] Synthese 136 (1):73 - 77.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Richard Anthony Fumerton (1974). Phenomenalism. Dissertation, Brown University
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Montgomery Furth (1967). Monadology. Philosophical Review 76 (2):169-200.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Robert L. Greenwood (1985). C.I. Lewis and the Issue of Phenomenalism. Philosophy Research Archives 11:441-452.
    According to the received view, the philosophy of C.I. Lewis is a form of phenomenalism. The first part of this paper is an argument designed to show that Lewis does not support one of the necessary conditions for ontological phenomenalism; namely, the sense-datum theory. The secondpart is an argument designed to show that Lewis’ theory is incompatible with linguistic phenomenalism, a view according to which there is an equivalence of meaning between physical object statements and sense-data statements. The argument is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Andy Hamilton (1998). Mill, Phenomenalism, and the Self. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Mill. Cambridge University Press 139--75.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. W. F. R. Hardie (1945). The Paradox of Phenomenalism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 46:127 - 154.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Takeo Iwasaki (1974). A Criticism of Phenomenalism. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 28 (1/2=107/108):116.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Vladimir Jankélévitch (1959). Le Je-Ne-Sais-Quol Et le Presque-Rien. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 15 (2):216-217.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Nicholas Jolley (1986). Leibniz and Phenomenalism. Studia Leibnitiana 18 (1):38-51.
    Leibniz est-il devenu phénoménaliste pendant ses années dernières ? Contre Furth et Loeb, ce travail rend une réponse négative à cette question. Quoique Leibniz a caressé les idées phénoménalistes, il ne les a jamais vraiment acceptées ; au contraire, il soutient une autre thèse réductioniste, c'est-à-dire que les corps sont des agrégats des monades. Cependant, cette conclusion entraîne ses propres difficultés, car à certains égards, la doctrine phénoménaliste paraît plus satisfaisante que l'option concurrante. On soutient que la répugnance leibnizienne à (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ran Lahav (1990). An Alternative to the Adverbial Theory: Dis-Phenomenalism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (3):553-568.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. T. Z. Lavine (1981). C. I. Lewis and the Problem of Phenomenalism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 41 (3):386-395.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. C. I. Lewis (1955). Realism or Phenomenalism? Philosophical Review 64 (2):233-247.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. David Liggins (2005). Truthmakers and Explanation. In Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.), Truthmakers: The Contemporary Debate. Clarendon 105--115.
    Truthmaker theory promises to do some useful philosophical work: equipping us to argue against phenomenalism and Rylean behaviourism, for instance, and helping us decide what exists (Lewis 1999, 207; Armstrong 1997, 113-119). But it has proved hard to formulate a truthmaker theory that is both useful and believable. I want to suggest that a neglected approach to truthmakers – that of Ian McFetridge – can surmount some of the problems that make other theories of truthmaking unattractive. To begin with, I’ll (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Ronald Loeffler (2005). Normative Phenomenalism: On Robert Brandom's Practice-Based Explanation of Meaning. European Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):32-69.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. D. G. C. Macnabb (1940). Phenomenalism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 41:67 - 90.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Colin McGinn (1980). Functionalism and Phenomenalism: A Critical Note. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (March):35-46.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. J. P. McKinney (1959). Phenomenalism: A Survey and Reassessment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 37 (3):221 – 233.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Robert McRae (1948). Phenomenalism and J. S. Mill's Theory of Causation. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 9 (2):237-250.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Asher Moore (1950). Verifiability and Phenomenalism. Journal of Philosophy 47 (7):169-177.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Gregory Nixon (2009). Skrbina's *Mind That Abides: Panpsychism in the New Millennium*. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (9):116-121.
    Is the great god Pan reborn? For a while there, it seemed every intellectual movement began with the prefix ‘post’, implying non-totality, but now there are indications that ‘pan’ (all) is returning to provide another answer to one of the most basic of ontological questions: What is the relationship of mind to matter? In this important book with 17 different authors, panpsychism is given its due.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Gregory Nixon (2000). Max Velmans' *Understanding Consciousness*. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (10):96-99.
    This is a fine book. In what has become a crowded field, it stands out as direct, deep, and daring. It should place Max Velmans amongst the stars in the field like Chalmers, Dennett, Searle, and Churchland who are most commonly referenced in consciousness studies books and articles. It is direct in that the de rigueur history and review of the body-mind problem is illuminating and concise. It is deep in that Velmans deconstructs the usual idea of an objective world (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Robert A. Oakes (1977). An Illusion About Phenomenalism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 15 (2):201-206.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Kenneth L. Pearce, Leibniz and the Veridicality of Body Perceptions.
    According to Leibniz's late metaphysics, sensory perception represents to us as extended, colored, textured, etc., a world which fundamentally consists only of non-spatial, colorless entities, the monads. It is a short step from here to the conclusion that sensory perception radically misleads us about the true nature of reality. In this paper, I argue that this oft-repeated claim is false. Leibniz holds that in typical cases of body perception the bodies perceived really exist and have the qualities, both primary and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Guido Peeters (1990). Some Reflections on Psychologism, Reductionism, and Related Issues Leading Towards an Epistemological Dualism of Reason and Experience. KU Leuven, Laboratorium Voor Experimentele Sociale Psychologie.
    Discussing ideas from Husserl's 'Vom Ursprung der Geometrie' and the author's research on human information processing, it is suggested that there may be two relatively independent modes of knowledge. They are tentatively referred to as 'experience' and 'reason'. They constitute an epistemological dualism that may enable to avoid certain circularities in the foundation of knowledge and that may provide an avenue towards the integration of scientific and preschientific (phenomenological) knowledge. This duality involves two horizons advanced yet bu Husserl, but we (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Michael Pelczar (2015). Sensorama: A Phenomenalist Analysis of Spacetime and Its Contents. Oxford University Press.
    How does the modern scientific conception of time constrain the project of assigning the mind its proper place in nature? On the scientific conception, it makes no sense to speak of the duration of a pain, or the simultaneity of sensations occurring in different parts of the brain. Such considerations led Henri Poincaré, one of the founders of the modern conception, to conclude that consciousness does not exist in spacetime, but serves as the basic material out of which we must (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 66