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  1. added 2016-07-27
    Paul Fryfogle, Defense of Rawls: A Reply to Brock.
    Cosmopolitans like Gillian Brock, Charles Beitz, and Thomas Pogge argue that the principles of justice selected and arranged in lexical priority in Rawls’ first original position would—and should for the same reasons as in the first—also be selected in Rawls’ second original position. After all, the argument goes, what reasons other than morally arbitrary ones do we have for selecting a second set of principles? A different, though undoubtedly related, point of contention is the cosmopolitan charge that Rawls fails to (...)
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  2. added 2016-07-27
    Michael Harrington (2016). Principle and Place: Complementary Concepts in Confucian Yijing Commentary. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):861-882.
    The classical Western concept of place points in two directions: toward isolating things from one another and toward articulating their connections. Aristotle’s famous definition of a thing’s place as the limit of its surrounding body, which serves to isolate the thing from all but its immediate surroundings, sits side-by-side in the Physics with his theory of natural places, according to which things have places only in relation to each other.1 A thing’s natural place may be at the center—as the earth (...)
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  3. added 2016-07-27
    Catherine Lynch (2016). Li Zehou and Pragmatism. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):704-719.
    In treatments of the relation of Chinese thought to pragmatism, pragmatism most commonly refers to the philosophy of John Dewey, and such treatments look to the Chinese past, whether recent or distant, not to contemporary Chinese philosophy. Nearly a century ago Dewey became the foremost exponent of pragmatism, both in the English-language world and also around the globe. In China, Dewey’s student Hu Shi was a seminal figure in the New Culture Movement. Dewey himself had a direct effect on Chinese (...)
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  4. added 2016-07-27
    Hans-Georg Moeller (2016). Zhuangzi: Thinking Through the Inner Chapters by Wang Bo. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1040-1043.
    Wang Bo’s Zhuangzi: Thinking Through the Inner Chapters is the first title of a new book series on “Contemporary Chinese Scholarship in Daoist Studies” by Three Pines Press, an independent U.S. publisher of academic literature on Daoism and scholarly translations of Daoist texts. It is also part of a larger current wave of translations of contemporary philosophical works by Chinese authors into English. In this new development, as in the case of Wang’s book, a publication is often sponsored by private (...)
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  5. added 2016-07-27
    Shyam Ranganathan (2016). The Yoga Sutra of Patanjali: A Biography by David Gordon White. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1043-1048.
    David Gordon White’s The Yoga Sutra of Patanjali: A Biography claims to be a biographical account of the life of the Yoga Sūtra. But it is instead an account of what people across times and continents have thought about the Yoga Sūtra. For the Lives of Great Religious Books series that White is contributing to with this volume, there is no difference: your life and what people thought about you amount to the same thing. For those of us who believe (...)
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  6. added 2016-07-27
    Weon-Ki Yoo (2016). The Problem of the Sadanpujungjŏl 四端不中節 in the Four-Seven Debate. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):805-817.
    The Sadanch’iljŏng nonbyŏn 四端七情論辨, or Sach’il nonbyŏn 四七論辨, for short, primarily refers to a debate that began in the form of a correspondence between Yi Hwang and Ki Tae-sŭng in sixteenth-century Korea.1 It is generally agreed that the Four-Seven Debate “was a great theoretical achievement” and “also set an excellent example in the pursuit of philosophical discussions” in Korea.2 It was the most famous and influential debate in the history of Korean Neo-Confucianism, bringing about vigorous scholarly discussion and resulting in (...)
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  7. added 2016-07-27
    Paul J. D'Ambrosio (2016). Approaches to Global Ethics: Michael Sandel's Justice and Li Zehou's Harmony. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):720-738.
    In recent years Michael Sandel’s communitarian criticism of John Rawls’s theory of justice has gained much attention in philosophical circles. Specifically, he takes issue with the conception of the self—implicit in Rawls’s “veil of ignorance”: an extraction of the individual from their social environment, which creates an “unencumbered self” that is then used to theorize about justice. Sandel believes that some social ties are so deeply embedded in the human experience that even hypothetical isolation of the individual is likely to (...)
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  8. added 2016-07-27
    Ming Dong Gu (2016). Confucian Ethics and the Spirit of World Order: A Reconception of the Chinese Way of Tolerance. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):787-804.
    No new global order without a new global ethic!Since the ending of the Cold War, the world has not gone in the direction of peace, harmony, stability, and cohesion. If during the Cold War period the world was divided into two large camps, it has today fragmented into many regions in strife, conflict, and war. Instead of a centripetal force that works toward a global unity accompanying the process of globalization, we are witnessing a centrifugal force that tears different countries (...)
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  9. added 2016-07-27
    George L. Israel (2016). The Renaissance of Wang Yangming Studies in the People's Republic of China. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1001-1019.
    The revival of Confucianism in China since the Reform and Opening is a topic that has received much scholarly attention. Beginning in the 1980s, this revival has included the establishment of a multitude of research institutes and study societies; local, national, and international conferences and symposiums; the restoration of historical sites; the introduction of a Confucian curriculum into schools; and an increasingly voluminous scholarship.1 Reasons for the revival include government policy and the search for “a new source of ideological legitimacy (...)
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  10. added 2016-07-27
    Emily McRae (2016). Asian and Feminist Philosophies in Dialogue: Liberating Traditions Ed. By Jennifer McWeeny and Ashby Butnor. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1035-1037.
    In their excellent new volume, Asian and Feminist Philosophies in Dialogue: Liberating Traditions, editors Jennifer McWeeny and Ashby Butnor offer a vision for philosophy that begins with the insight that philosophy is an activity: it is something that we do rather than simply learn about. As an activity—or even, at times, a performance—philosophy both shapes and is shaped by the social world, a world of power hierarchies, economic realities, and political strategies. Conceiving of philosophy as a socially situated activity highlights (...)
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  11. added 2016-07-27
    Stephen Phillips (2016). Creative Commentary. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1020-1026.
    Engagement with texts however distant from us in culture and history—distant, that is, from contemporary anglophone philosophy—tries to make them part of an ongoing conversation, focusing on topics and arguments as opposed to context or history. And, as Jonardon Ganeri reports of the innovative Nyāya philosopher Raghunātha Śiromaṇi, who emerges as the hero of The Lost Age of Reason: Philosophy in Early Modern India 1450–1700, this can take the form of “asides and marginal notes, of the sort one makes not (...)
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  12. added 2016-07-27
    R. A. Carleo (2016). Huiying Sangde'er Ji Qita 回應桑德爾及其他 by Li Zehou. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1027-1029.
    Do not be misled. Despite its title, Li Zehou’s Huiying Sangde’er ji qita 回應桑德爾及其他 only rarely engages the thought of its supposed object, Michael Sandel. Rather, this informal text, which takes the form of an interview or dialogue, appropriates Sandel as a means of discussing and critiquing the modern Western philosophical tradition in general. Rather than examining the Harvard professor’s actual arguments, Li brings up the hypothetical moral quandaries and discussions Sandel works with as a means of asserting his own (...)
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  13. added 2016-07-27
    Germaine A. Hoston (2016). Une Modernité Indigène: Ruptures Et Innovations Dans les Théories Politiques Japonaise du Xviii E Siècle by Olivier Ansart. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1029-1032.
    Une modernité indigène: Ruptures et innovations dans les théories politiques japonaise du xviiie siècle, by Olivier Ansart, is a thoughtful, elegantly written book that offers valuable insights into Japanese political thought in an era that culminated in the Meiji Restoration. Despite the specific characteristics of the rigid centralized feudal structure of Tokugawa society, Ansart argues, political ideas generally associated with the advent of “modernity” in the West were generated indigenously in a context in which knowledge of the West was limited (...)
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  14. added 2016-07-27
    Eric S. Nelson (2016). Reflections of a Zen Buddhist Nun by Kim Iryŏp. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1049-1051.
    Kim Iryŏp was raised and initially educated in a devout Methodist Christian environment under the strict guidance of her fideistic pastor father and her mother, who believed in female education. Both parents died while she was in her teens, and she questioned her Christian faith at an early age. She was one of the first Korean women to pursue higher education in Korea and Japan. Kim became a prolific poet and essayist, her writings engaging cultural and social issues, and a (...)
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  15. added 2016-07-27
    Evan Thompson (2016). Précis of Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):927-933.
    The central idea of Waking, Dreaming, Being is that the self is a process, not a thing or an entity.1 The self isn’t something outside experience, hidden either in the brain or in some immaterial realm. It is an experiential process that is subject to constant change. We enact a self in the process of awareness, and this self comes and goes depending on how we are aware.When we’re awake and occupied with some manual task, we enact a bodily self (...)
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  16. added 2016-07-27
    Nicholas S. Brasovan (2016). Considerations For A Confucian Ecological Humanism. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):842-860.
    My thesis is based on the methodological assumption that the Analects of Confucius should be interpreted within the greater context of the Four Books, Five Classics, Xunzi, and works of Neo-Confucian literati. Here I argue that the Analects can be consistently modeled as an environmental ethics of weak anthropocentrism so long as it is read according to two provisos: first, that “weak anthropocentrism” be used in its standard sense in the context of contemporary environmental ethics, and, second, that the hermeneutic (...)
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  17. added 2016-07-27
    John D. Dunne (2016). Comments on Waking, Dreaming, Being by Evan Thompson. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):934-942.
    Evan Thompson’s Waking, Dreaming, Being is an outstanding work that richly deserves the widespread praise that it is receiving. The book exhibits exquisite balance between various poles: science and philosophy, “East” and “West,” the accessible and the specialized, the physical and the emergent, and so on. It is also a remarkably readable book, and since academic literature is littered with many unreadable must-read tomes, I am grateful for the change of pace. In short, those who have not yet read Waking, (...)
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  18. added 2016-07-27
    Kurtis G. Hagen (2016). Would Early Confucians Really Support Humanitarian Interventions? Philosophy East and West 66 (3):818-841.
    Many scholars view Confucianism as relatively open to war, as a legitimate tool for maintaining order and rescuing oppressed peoples. Indeed, it is not uncommon for statements such as the following to be presented as though they were straightforward matters of fact: “Confucians would approve the use of force by one state against another state for the protection against abusive rule in the latter if properly carried out”.1 Such claims find support in the work of Daniel A. Bell, Tongdong Bai, (...)
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  19. added 2016-07-27
    Jinhua Jia (2016). Li Zehou's Reconception of the Confucian Ethics of Emotion. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):757-786.
    Li Zehou 李澤厚, one of the outstanding contemporary thinkers, coins the term “emotio-rational structure” for his ethical theory. Li emphasizes a balanced and integrated structure of emotion and reason, and the core of this structure is an innovative combination of Kantian rationalism and Confucian ethics. Li admires Immanuel Kant’s rational ontology of ethics, but criticizes his exclusion of human emotion and desire. Li advocates complementing Kantian rationalism with the Confucian ethics of emotion, which he calls “emotion as substance”. He believes (...)
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  20. added 2016-07-27
    Yaser Mirdamadi (2016). The Misty Land of Ideas and the Light of Dialogue: An Anthology of Comparative Philosophy: Western & Islamic Ed. By Ali Paya. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1038-1040.
    At a time when the ‘end’ of comparative philosophy has been announced1 or comparative philosophy has been taken to be a pragmatic enterprise, implying the ‘end’ of a realist interpretation of comparative philosophy,2 the book under review here, The Misty Land of Ideas and the Light of Dialogue: An Anthology of Comparative Philosophy: Western & Islamic, edited by Ali Paya, appears to be aiming at bucking the trend. It sets out, according to its editor, to contribute to a realist conception (...)
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  21. added 2016-07-27
    John Ramsey (2016). Confucian Role Ethics and Relational Autonomy in the Mengzi. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):903-922.
    This essay examines whether Confucian role ethics offers resources to identify and redress gender inequality and oppression. On its face, Confucian role ethics seems ill suited for this task for two reasons. First, a central tenet of role ethics is that a person is constituted by her roles. Because roles are constituted by norms that govern them, many social roles are, and have been, historically oppressive. Second, discussions of Confucian role ethics tend to avoid talk of autonomy, yet autonomy is (...)
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  22. added 2016-07-27
    Roger T. Ames & Peter D. Hershock (2016). Introduction. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):699-703.
    This special issue of Philosophy East and West is dedicated to the inaugural meeting of the World Consortium for Research in Confucian Cultures, convened at the University of Hawai‘i and the East-West Center, October 8-12, 2014, on the theme “Confucian Values in a Changing World Cultural Order,” to explore the contributions of Confucian thought to world culture. The conference brought together leading scholars from partner institutions around the world to explore critically the meaning and value of Confucian culture in the (...)
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  23. added 2016-07-27
    Jennifer M. Windt (2016). Dreaming, Imagining, and First-Person Methods in Philosophy: Commentary on Evan Thompson's Waking, Dreaming, Being. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):959-981.
    Evan’s book is in many ways an exercise in remapping. The first is suggested by the book’s title. Waking, Dreaming, Being challenges existing ways of mapping the conceptual relationship between conscious states across the sleep-wake cycle. The idea that waking and dreaming are not discrete states but can interpenetrate each other—that, to use Evan’s words, they “aren’t opposed but flow into and out of [one] an other” —is a central theme running through the book. If Evan is correct, then the (...)
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  24. added 2016-07-27
    Christian Coseru (2016). Introduction to Symposium on Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy by Evan Thompson. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):923-926.
    The papers gathered here were first presented at an “Author Meets Critics” invited session that I organized for the Pacific Division of the American Philosophical Association meeting, held in Vancouver, April 1–5, 2015, on Evan Thompson’s book Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy. Thompson opened the session with a précis of his book, which was followed by critical commentaries from John Dunne, Owen Flanagan, and Jay Garfield; Jennifer Windt was also an invited contributor to this (...)
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  25. added 2016-07-27
    Jay L. Garfield (2016). Reflections on Reflectivity: Comments on Evan Thompson's Waking, Dreaming, Being. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):943-951.
    Evan Thompson has written a marvelous book. Waking, Dreaming, Being blends intellectual autobiography, phenomenology, cognitive science, studies in Buddhist and Vedānta philosophy, and creative metaphilosophy in an exploration of what it is to be a person, of the nature of consciousness, and of the relation of contemplative to scientific method in the understanding of human life. I have learned a great deal from it, and the community of philosophers and cognitive scientists will be reading and discussing it for some time. (...)
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  26. added 2016-07-27
    Xingming Hu (2016). Why Be Moral? Learning From the Neo-Confucian Cheng Brothers by Yong Huang. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1032-1035.
    Why Be Moral? Learning from the Neo-Confucian Cheng Brothers, by Yong Huang, is a book written for Western philosophers. Professor Huang claims that there are two ways of introducing a Chinese philosopher to Western audiences: first, by showing them that the Chinese philosopher’s ideas are ridiculous or inferior compared to the corresponding Western ideas, and second, by showing them that the Chinese philosopher has better answers to some Western philosophical questions than great Western philosophers. Huang thinks the first way is (...)
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  27. added 2016-07-27
    U. Edward McDougall (2016). Everydayness, Divinity, and the Sacred: Shinto and Heidegger. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):883-902.
    The sacred or holy is central to Heidegger’s later writings, “The Thing” and “Building Dwelling Thinking” taking it as their focus. This aspect of his philosophy is often viewed as lacking in coherence1 or an attempt to return to Ancient Greek religion.2 Heideggerian notions of the gods or the sacred have frequently been dismissed or neglected, with even sympathetic commentators like Julian Young playing down their importance.Heidegger’s later thought, however, represents one of the most radical attempts to critically rethink divinity (...)
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  28. added 2016-07-27
    Michael Nylan (2016). Li Zehou's Lunyu Jindu. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):739-756.
    This essay takes as it subject Lunyu jindu 論語今讀, Li Zehou’s “translation” from classical into modern Chinese of one of the Four Books, a classic that long-standing tradition claims was generated within the immediate circles of Master Confucius himself. Rather than blandly touting the inherent superiority of whichever brands of Chinese or Confucian “tradition” currently meet the approval of leading PRC figures in establishment politics, academia, and the media—old Daotong 道統 truisms retrofitted for nationalistic purposes 1—Li wants to deconstruct “tradition”. (...)
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  29. added 2016-07-27
    Evan Thompson (2016). Response to Commentators on Waking, Dreaming, Being. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):982-1000.
    Let me begin by thanking my commentators for taking the time to read my book and to write such constructive commentaries. I would also like to thank Christian Coseru for organizing and chairing the panel at the International Society for Buddhist Philosophy at the 2015 meeting of the Pacific Division of the American Philosophical Association, at which three of the commentaries were originally presented together with my response. Finally, I am grateful to Philosophy East and West for publishing this exchange. (...)
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  30. added 2016-07-27
    Jarrod W. Brown (2016). Buddhism in a Dark Age: Cambodian Monks Under Pol Pot by Ian Harris. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1052-1053.
    Buddhism in a Dark Age: Cambodian Monks under Pol Pot, by Ian Harris, is a natural follow-up to Harris’s 2005 work, Cambodian Buddhism: History and Practice, also published by the University of Hawai‘i Press. The present work, like the earlier one, is primarily focused on the social and political history of Cambodian Buddhism and expands on the final two chapters of that earlier work in that it deals with Buddhism in Democratic Kampuchea from 1975 to 1979 and the aftermath of (...)
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  31. added 2016-07-27
    Owen Flanagan (2016). Does Yoga Induce Metaphysical Hallucinations?: Interdisciplinarity at the Edge: Comments on Evan Thompson's Waking, Dreaming, Being. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):952-958.
    Waking, Dreaming, Being is an unusual book in many ways. I mention two. First, in some ways it is a memoir. Few philosophers started as a child doing the sort of philosophy that they did as a grown-up. Evan did. Evan grew up in the intellectually fertile world of the Lindisfarne Association, the collaborative of scientists, artists, ecologists, and contemplatives founded by his father, William Irwin Thompson, a polymath, whom I had the pleasure of meeting in 2004 at the Crestone (...)
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  32. added 2016-07-26
    Steven Crowell (2016). Experiencing History: David Carr’s Philosophy of History. Research in Phenomenology 46 (3):441-455.
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  33. added 2016-07-26
    Niall Keane (2016). The Continually Expanding Limits of Hermeneutics: Heidegger on Poetic Expression, Nature, and the Holy. Research in Phenomenology 46 (3):349-368.
    _ Source: _Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 349 - 368 This article sets itself the task of explicating and assessing Heidegger’s hermeneutically expansive analyses of the ‘holy,’ ‘poetic expression,’ and ‘nature’ in his 1934/35 and 1944 Hölderlin lectures. The piece looks specifically at how Heidegger rearticulates poetic expression and nature through the fundamental attunement of ‘holy mourning’, which he finds in Hölderlin’s _Germanien_. I demonstrate how these two lecture courses, published as GA 4 and GA 39, offer us important insights (...)
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  34. added 2016-07-26
    Joseph P. Lawrence (2016). Schelling Between Socrates and Deleuze: On the Difficulty of Challenging Stupidity. Research in Phenomenology 46 (3):477-484.
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  35. added 2016-07-26
    Rafael Winkler (2016). Time, Singularity and the Impossible: Heidegger and Derrida on Dying. Research in Phenomenology 46 (3):405-425.
    _ Source: _Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 405 - 425 This article focuses on Heidegger’s reflection on death in Being and Time, on the question of whether death can be mine, on what the connection between death and mineness can tell us about schizophrenia, and on the relation between Heidegger’s talk of death and mineness and Derrida’s talk of mourning and mineness.
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  36. added 2016-07-26
    Alejandro A. Vallega (2016). Naufrages, of Derrida’s “Final” Seminar. Research in Phenomenology 46 (3):390-404.
    _ Source: _Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 390 - 404 This article puts into play the ghostly horizon of “death” as it follows its semblances through Derrida’s reading of Heidegger in the French thinker’s last seminars as published in _The Beast and the Sovereign_ Vol. II. The moments I underscore are three, always marking the playing out or releasing of death’s ghost, its sovereignty over life, while the readings, drift off driven by other forces: 1. In Session IV, Derrida’s enjambment (...)
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  37. added 2016-07-26
    Susanna Lindberg (2016). Derrida’s Quasi-Technique. Research in Phenomenology 46 (3):369-389.
    _ Source: _Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 369 - 389 The article’s aim is to measure the potential of Derrida’s work for a philosophy of technique. It shows why Derrida does not present a positive philosophy of technology but rather describes technique as a _quasi_-technique, _as if_ a technique. The article inquires into the potential of such a quasi-technique for a contemporary philosophy of technology: it is suggested that it can function as a salutary “deconstruction” of mainstream philosophy of technology (...)
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  38. added 2016-07-26
    Robert Dostal (2016). Gadamer, Kant, and the Enlightenment. Research in Phenomenology 46 (3):337-348.
    _ Source: _Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 337 - 348 Gadamer is prominent on the list of counter-enlightenment philosophers of the20th century. He is on this list for good reasons, reasons that I will briefly explore here. Gadamer borrows much from Heidegger’s critique of modernity and he adds to it. As we all know, Gadamer’s critique of the Enlightenment and modernity serves as an opening for a reappropriation of the Greeks, especially Plato and Aristotle. Gadamer is often taken, again with (...)
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  39. added 2016-07-26
    Yoav Kenny (2016). Force of Flesh: From the Phenomenology of the Living Body to the Ethics of Meat Consumption in Derrida’s Deconstruction of Law and Justice. Research in Phenomenology 46 (3):426-439.
    _ Source: _Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 426 - 439 The concept of _flesh_ had a very short and fragmented career in the writings of Jacques Derrida, appearing as such in central arguments only in his reading of Antonin Artaud from 1965 and in an interview with Jean-Luc Nancy from 1988. By exposing and exploring several implicit discussions of flesh in Derrida’s juridico-political texts from the 1990s, this paper outlines the conceptualization of flesh implicit in Derrida’s work and, consequently, argues (...)
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  40. added 2016-07-26
    Charles Bambach (2016). Does the Saving Power Grow? Research in Phenomenology 46 (3):466-476.
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  41. added 2016-07-26
    Lawrence J. Hatab (2016). Interpreting Heidegger. Research in Phenomenology 46 (3):456-465.
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  42. added 2016-07-26
    Héctor Arévalo Benito (2015). "Estudios sobre el pensamiento hispanoamericano en José Gaos", Ecuador, Utp, 2015. UTp.
    Estudio sobre diferentes aspectos, desde la E. Moderna a la Contemporánea, en el pensamiento de J. Gaos en sus textos de los años 40.
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  43. added 2016-07-26
    Daniel Nica (2015). Nietzsche and Foucault on Self-Creation: Two Different Projects. Annals of the University of Bucharest. Philosophy Series 64 (1):21-41.
    This paper aims to highlight some major differences between the ethics of “self-becoming”, as it was sketched by Friedrich Nietzsche, and the so-called “aesthetics of existence”, which was developed in Michel Foucault’s late work. Although the propinquity between the two authors is a commonplace in Foucauldian exegesis, my claim is that the two projects of self-creation are dissimilar in four relevant aspects. To support my thesis I will use Foucault’s four-part ethical framework through which I will analyze each of the (...)
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  44. added 2016-07-26
    Daniel Marcelle, Claudia Şerban, Christian Rössner, Daniel Dwyer, Délia Popa, Madalina Diaconu, Rolf Kühn & Stephan Steiner (2011). Aron Gurwitsch, The Collected Works of Aron Gurwitsch, Volume I: Constitutive Phenomenology in Historical Perspective , Dordrecht: Springer, 2009; Volume II: Studies in Phenomenology and Psychology , Dordrecht: Springer, 2010; Volume III: The Field of Consciousness: Theme, Thematic Field, and Margin , Dordrecht: Springer, 2010 Jean-Luc Marion, Certitudes Négatives, Paris: Grasset, 2010 Hans-Dieter Gondek, László Tengelyi, Neue Phänomenologie in Frankreich, Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2011 Hans-Helmuth Gander , Husserl-Lexikon, Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 2010 Jean-François Lavigne, Accéder au Transcendantal? Réduction Et Idéalisme Transcendantal Dans les Idées Directrices Pour Une Phénoménologie Pure Et Une Philosophie Phénoménologique de Husserl, Paris: Vrin, 2009 Lambert Wiesing, Das Mich der Wahrnehmung. Eine Autopsie, Frankfurt Am Main: Suhrkamp, 2009 Sam B. Girgus, Levinas and the Cinema of Redemption. Time, Ethics, and the Feminine, New York: Columbia University Press, 2. [REVIEW] Studia Phaenomenologica 11:365-394.
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  45. added 2016-07-26
    Franç Jullien & Alcois (2005). The Shadow on the Picture: Of Evil or the Negative. Critical Inquiry 32 (1):130-150.
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  46. added 2016-07-25
    Anthony Vincent Fernandez (forthcoming). Phenomenology and Dimensional Approaches to Psychiatric Research and Classification. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology.
    The classification of mental illness—enshrined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)—has historically followed a categorial model of disorder. However, in light of psychiatry’s failure to validate the DSM categories, psychiatrists have developed dimensional models for understanding and classifying disorders, such as the National Institute of Mental Health’s Research Domain Criteria initiative (RDoC). While some philosophers have recently contributed to the literature on dimensional approaches to psychiatric research and classification, no sustained engagement has yet been offered by (...)
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  47. added 2016-07-25
    Esteban J. Beltrán Ulate (2016). Beltrán, E. (2016) Reseña: “Andrew Shepherd (2014) The Gift of the Other: Levinas, Derrida, and a Theology of Hospitality. Princeton Theological Monograph Series, James Clarke & Co with the arrangement of Pickwick ”. Phenomenological Reviews, 22 Mayo, 2016, ISSN 2297-7627. [REVIEW] Phenomenological Reviews 1 (1).
    La editorial James Clarke & Co., a través de Pickwick Publications, posibilita la publicación de una obra de Andrew Shepherd. El texto, intitulado “The Gift of the Other. Levinas, Derrida, and a Theology of Hospitality”, permite una reflexión a propósito de la noción de Regalo (Gift). La presente reseña asume como objetivo una exposición del texto a partir de una serie de comentarios sobre cada una de las secciones, más un comentario final para concluir. En orden a presentar al lector (...)
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  48. added 2016-07-25
    Caleb Ward (2016). The Ethics of Eating as a Human Organism. In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge 48-58.
    Conventional ethics of how humans should eat often ignore that human life is itself a form of organic activity. Using Henri Bergson’s notions of intellect and intuition, this chapter brings a wider perspective of the human organism to the ethical question of how humans appropriate life for nutriment. The intellect’s tendency to instrumentalize living things as though they were inert seems to subtend the moral failures evident in practices such as industrial animal agriculture. Using the case study of Temple Grandin’s (...)
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  49. added 2016-07-25
    Anthony Vincent Fernandez (2016). The Phenomenology of Psychopathological Embodiment: A Critique of Thomas Fuchs' Concept of Corporealization. Journal of Consciousness Studies 23 (3-4):50-75.
    In this article I offer a critical analysis and evaluation of Thomas Fuchs' concept of corporealization, as well as the Leib/Körper distinction (i.e. the distinction between the lived and corporeal body) that it is founded upon. First, I show that the foundational concepts -- Leib and Körper -- are problematically heterogeneous, each including a diverse set of phenomena requiring further delineation and clarification. Second, I consider the historical origins of this heterogeneity and ambiguity within Fuchs' work. I show that Fuchs' (...)
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  50. added 2016-07-25
    Franç Jullien & Alcois (2005). The Shadow on the Picture: Of Evil or the Negative. Critical Inquiry 32 (1):130-150.
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