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Philosophy of Action

Edited by Constantine Sandis (Oxford Brookes University)
Assistant editor: István Zárdai (University of Pécs, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy, Oxford Brookes University)
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  1. added 2015-05-04
    Larry Alexander (2014). Hart and Punishment for Negligence. In C. G. Pulman (ed.), Hart on Responsibility.
  2. added 2015-05-04
    Gideon Yaffe (2014). Hart's Choices. In C. G. Pulman (ed.), Hart on Responsibility.
  3. added 2015-04-29
    Matteo Bianchin (forthcoming). Simulation and the We-Mode. A Cognitive Account of Plural First Persons. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393115580267.
    I argue that a capacity for mindreading conceived along the line of simulation theory provides the cognitive basis for forming we-centric representations of actions and goals. This explains the plural first personal stance displayed by we-intentions in terms of the underlying cognitive processes performed by individual minds, while preserving the idea that they cannot be analyzed in terms of individual intentional states. The implication for social ontology is that this makes sense of the plural subjectivity of joint actions without making (...)
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  4. added 2015-04-27
    Chris Heathwood (forthcoming). Desire-Fulfillment Theory. In Guy Fletcher (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Well-Being. Routledge.
    Explains the desire-fulfillment theory of well-being, its history, its development, its varieties, its advantages, and its challenges.
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  5. added 2015-04-27
    Ghita Holmström-Hintikka & Raimo Tuomela (1997). Contemporary Action Theory.
  6. added 2015-04-25
    Helen Steward (2014). Causing Things and Doing Things. In C. G. Pulman (ed.), Hart on Responsibility.
  7. added 2015-04-23
    David-Hillel Ruben (forthcoming). A Conditional Theory of Trying. Philosophical Studies:1-17.
    What I shall do in this paper is to propose an analysis of ‘Agent P tries to A’ in terms of a subjunctive conditional, that avoids some of the problems that beset most alternative accounts of trying, which I call ‘referential views’. They are so-named because on these alternative accounts, ‘P tries to A’ entails that there is a trying to A by P, and therefore the expression ‘P’s trying to A’ can occur in the subject of a sentence and (...)
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  8. added 2015-04-23
    Narve Strand (2014). Decision/Resolve. In Jon Stewart (ed.), Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 15, tome II. Ashgate. 135-138.
  9. added 2015-04-23
    Ellery Eells (1982). Rational Decision and Causality. Cambridge University Press.
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  10. added 2015-04-21
    José Antúnez Cid (2006). La intersubjetividad en Xavier Zubiri. PUG.
    A deep research in the philosophical (between phenomenology and new metaphysics) anthropology of Zubiri looking for how the human person connects and grows with others from metaphysical root until social development, studying love as personalist connection. Origin, embryo ontological status and death are also studied.
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  11. added 2015-04-20
    Nikil Mukerji & Julian Nida-Rümelin (forthcoming). Economic Rationality and the Optimization Trap. St. Gallen Business Review 2015 (1).
    The theme of this issue of the St. Gallen Business Review is "Harmony". For this reason, we would like to discuss whether two aspects of our life- world are in harmony, namely economic optimization and morality. What is the relation between them? According to a widely shared view, which is one aspect of the doctrine of "mainstream economics", the functioning of an economic system does not require moral behaviour on the part of the individual economic agent. In what follows, we (...)
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  12. added 2015-04-18
    Joseph Raz, The Guise of the Bad.
    My remarks will focus primarily on the connection between the thesis of the Guise of the Good, and actions under the Guise of the Bad. I distinguish and discuss separately two versions of the Guise of the Bad thesis. The normative version claims that it is possible to perform an action that one believes to be bad (to have bad-making features) and for the reason that it is, as the agent believes, bad. The motive version claims that an agent can, (...)
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  13. added 2015-04-18
    Marc Champagne (2015). Don’T Be an Ass: Rational Choice and its Limits. Reason Papers 37 (1):137-147.
  14. added 2015-04-18
    Sarah K. Paul (2015). Rational and Social Agency: The Philosophy of Michael Bratman. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 3 (43).
  15. added 2015-04-18
    Katarzyna Paprzycka (1997). E.J. Lowe, Subjects Of Experience. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 17:45-47.
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  16. added 2015-04-18
    Charles Ripley (1995). "Actions and Other Events: The Unifier-Multiplier Controversy", by Karl Pfeifer. [REVIEW] Dialogue 34:190.
  17. added 2015-04-17
    Patrick Todd & John Martin Fischer (2015). Introduction. In John Martin Fischer & Patrick Todd (eds.), Freedom, Fatalism, and Foreknowledge. Oxford University Press. 01-38.
    This Introduction has three sections, on "logical fatalism," "theological fatalism," and the problem of future contingents, respectively. In the first two sections, we focus on the crucial idea of "dependence" and the role it plays it fatalistic arguments. Arguably, the primary response to the problems of logical and theological fatalism invokes the claim that the relevant past truths or divine beliefs depend on what we do, and therefore needn't be held fixed when evaluating what we can do. We call the (...)
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  18. added 2015-04-17
    John Martin Fischer & Patrick Todd (eds.) (2015). Freedom, Fatalism, and Foreknowledge. Oxford University Press.
    We typically think we have free will. But how could we have free will, if for anything we do, it was already true in the distant past that we would do that thing? Or how could we have free will, if God already knows in advance all the details of our lives? Such issues raise the specter of "fatalism". This book collects sixteen previously published articles on fatalism, truths about the future, and the relationship between divine foreknowledge and human freedom, (...)
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  19. added 2015-04-17
    Paul C. Anders, Joshua C. Thurow & Kenneth Hochstetter (2014). On Counterfactuals of Libertarian Freedom: Is There Anything I Would Have Done If I Could Have Done Otherwise? American Philosophical Quarterly 51 (1):85-94.
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  20. added 2015-04-16
    Conor Mayo-Wilson & Gregory Wheeler (forthcoming). Scoring Imprecise Credences: A Mildly Immodest Proposal. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
  21. added 2015-04-15
    H. Orri Stefánsson & Richard Bradley (forthcoming). How Valuable Are Chances? Philosophy of Science.
  22. added 2015-04-15
    H. Orri Stefánsson (forthcoming). Fair Chance and Modal Consequentialism. Economics and Philosophy 31 (3).
  23. added 2015-04-14
    Nikil Mukerji & Christoph Schumacher (forthcoming). Is the Minimum Wage Ethically Justifiable? An Order-Ethical Answer. In Christoph Luetge & Nikil Mukerji (eds.), Order Ethics: An Ethical Framework for the Social Market Economy. Springer.
    Is the minimum wage ethically justifiable? In this chapter, we attempt to answer this question from an order-ethical perspective. To this end, we develop two simple game theoretical models for different types of labour markets and derive policy implications from an order-ethical viewpoint. Our investigation yields a twofold conclusion. Firstly, order ethicists should prefer a tax-funded wage subsidy over minimum wages, if they assume that labour markets are perfectly competitive. Secondly, order ethics suggests that the minimum wage can be ethically (...)
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  24. added 2015-04-13
    Joseph Ellin (unknown). Monty Hall No Newcomb Problem. Proceedings of the Heraclitean Society 17.
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  25. added 2015-04-13
    James Andow & Florian Cova (forthcoming). Why Compatibilist Intuitions Are Not Mistaken: A Reply to Feltz and Millan. Philosophical Psychology.
    In the past decade, a number of empirical researchers have suggested that laypeople have compatibilist intuitions. In a recent paper, Feltz and Millan (in press) have challenged this conclusion by claiming that most laypeople are only compatibilists in appearance, and are rather willing to attribute free will no matter what. As evidence for this claim, they have shown that an important proportion of laypeople still attribute free will to agents in fatalistic universes. In this paper we first argue that Feltz (...)
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  26. added 2015-04-13
    Arthur Falk (1993). Summer 1991: The "Monty Hall" Problem; Fall 1993: The Two Envelopes Puzzle; And Now: Doomsday. Proceedings of the Heraclitean Society 17:64.
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  27. added 2015-04-08
    Facundo M. Alonso (forthcoming). Reasons for Reliance. Ethics.
    Philosophers have in general offered only a partial view of the normative grounds of reliance. Some maintain that either one of evidence or of pragmatic considerations has a normative bearing on reliance, but are silent about whether the other kind of consideration has such a bearing on it as well. Others assert that both kinds of considerations have a normative bearing on reliance, but sidestep the question of what their relative normative bearing is. My aim in this article is to (...)
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  28. added 2015-04-07
    Neil McDonnell, The Deviance in Deviant Causal Chains.
    Causal theories of action, perception and knowledge are each beset by problems of so-called ‘deviant’ causal chains. For each such theory, counterexamples are formed using odd or co-incidental causal chains to establish that the theory is committed to unpalatable claims about some intentional action, about a case of veridical perception or about the acquisition of genuine knowledge. In this paper I will argue that three well-known examples of a deviant causal chain have something in common: they each violate Yablos proportionality (...)
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  29. added 2015-04-07
    David L. Wilson (2015). Nonphysical Souls Would Violate Physical Laws. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 349-367.
    This paper argues that nonphysical souls would violate fundamental physical laws if they were able to influence brain events. Though we have no idea how nonphysical souls might operate, we know quite a bit about how brains work, so we can consider each of the ways that an external force could interrupt brain processes enough to control one’s body. It concludes that there is no way that a nonphysical soul could interact with the brain—neither by introducing new energy into the (...)
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  30. added 2015-04-07
    Raymond D. Bradley (2015). Can God Condemn One to an Afterlife in Hell? In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 441-471.
    This paper argues that God is not logically able to condemn a person to Hell by considering what is entailed by accepting the best argument to the contrary, the so-called free will defense expounded by Christian apologists Alvin Plantinga and William Lane Craig. It argues that the free will defense is logically fallacious, involves a philosophical fiction, and is based on a fraudulent account of Scripture, concluding that the problem of postmortem evil puts would-be believers in a logical and moral (...)
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  31. added 2015-04-06
    Pavel Lushyn & David Kennedy (unknown). Power, Manipulation and Control in a Community of Inquiry. Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 23 (2):103-110.
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  32. added 2015-04-06
    Harold W. Noonan (forthcoming). Two-Boxing is Irrational. Philosophia:1-8.
    Philosophers debate whether one-boxing or two-boxing is the rational act in a Newcomb situation. I shall argue that one-boxing is the only rational choice. This is so because there is no intelligible aim by reference to which you can justify the choice of two-boxing over one-boxing once you have come to think that you will two-box . The only aim by which the agent in the Newcomb situation can justify his two-boxing is the subjunctively described aim of ‘getting more than (...)
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  33. added 2015-04-06
    Marie Gisclard, Émilia Chantre, Marianne Cerf & Laurence Guichard (forthcoming). Co-Click’Eau : Une Démarche D’Intermédiation Pour la Construction D’Une Action Collective Locale ? Natures Sciences Sociétés.
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  34. added 2015-04-06
    Yishai Cohen (forthcoming). The Manipulation Argument, At the Very Least, Undermines Classical Compatibilism. Philosophia:1-17.
    The compatibility of determinism and the ability to do otherwise has been implicitly assumed by many to be irrelevant to the viability of compatibilist responses to the manipulation argument for incompatibilism. I argue that this assumption is mistaken. The manipulation argument may be unsound. But even so, the manipulation argument, at the very least, undermines classical compatibilism, the view that free will requires the ability to do otherwise, and having that ability is compatible with determinism. This is because classical compatibilism, (...)
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  35. added 2015-04-06
    Wolfgang Schwarz (forthcoming). Lost Memories and Useless Coins: Revisiting the Absentminded Driver. Synthese:1-26.
    The puzzle of the absentminded driver combines an unstable decision problem with a version of the Sleeping Beauty problem. Its analysis depends on the choice between “halfing” and “thirding” as well as that between “evidential” and “causal” decision theory. I show that all four combinations lead to interestingly different solutions, and draw some general lessons about the formulation of causal decision theory, the interpretation of mixed strategies and the connection between rational credence and objective chance.
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  36. added 2015-04-06
    Michael Robinson (forthcoming). Revisionism, Libertarianism, and Naturalistic Plausibility. Philosophical Studies.
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  37. added 2015-04-06
    Bas van Bommel (2015). 2. The Challenge of the Bürgerschule. In , Classical Humanism and the Challenge of Modernity: Debates on Classical Education in 19th-Century Germany. De Gruyter. 110-167.
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  38. added 2015-04-06
    Susanna Rinard (2015). A Decision Theory for Imprecise Probabilities. Philosophers' Imprint 15 (7).
    Those who model doxastic states with a set of probability functions, rather than a single function, face a pressing challenge: can they provide a plausible decision theory compatible with their view? Adam Elga and others claim that they cannot, and that the set of functions model should be rejected for this reason. This paper aims to answer this challenge. The key insight is that the set of functions model can be seen as an instance of the supervaluationist approach to vagueness (...)
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  39. added 2015-04-06
    Paul Hoyningen-Huene (2015). A Note on the Concept of Game. In Anna Wehofsits, David Löwenstein, Dirk Koppelberg & Gregor Betz (eds.), Weiter Denken - Über Philosophie, Wissenschaft Und Religion. De Gruyter. 205-210.
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  40. added 2015-04-06
    A. W. Price (2015). Backsliding: Understanding Weakness of Will, by Alfred R. Mele. Mind 124 (493):370-373.
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  41. added 2015-04-06
    Constantine Sandis (ed.) (2015). Philosophy of Action. Wiley.
    The Philosophy of Action: An Anthology is an authoritative collection of key work by top scholars, arranged thematically and accompanied by expert introductions written by the editors. This unique collection brings together a selection of the most influential essays from the 1960s to the present day. An invaluable collection that brings together a selection of the most important classic and contemporary articles in philosophy of action, from the 1960’s to the present day No other broad-ranging and detailed coverage of this (...)
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  42. added 2015-04-06
    Robert Maciel (2015). Relative Justice: Cultural Diversity, Free Will, and Moral Responsibility. The European Legacy 20 (3):306-307.
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  43. added 2015-04-06
    Curran F. Douglass (2015). Rationality, Control, and Freedom: Making Sense of Human Freedom. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.
    This book provides a concise, clear summary of the history of the "free will" vs. determinism controversy and offers a discussion of the basic differences of view.
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  44. added 2015-04-06
    Mark Leon (2015). Freedom and Determinism: The Importance of Method. Philosophical Investigations 38 (1-2):n/a-n/a.
    The question of the relation between freedom and determinism elicits contrasting intuitions. It is clear to incompatibilists that freedom requires the falsity of determinism. And it is clear to compatibilists that freedom is compatible with forms of determinism. Compatibilists and incompatibilists differ not only with respect to the content of their accounts, but also with respect to their “method”. Whereas, compatibilists could be represented as elucidating our ordinary notion of freedom, incompatibilists could be represented as offering a revision of that (...)
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  45. added 2015-04-06
    Mark Piper (2014). Valenta on Frankfurt’s Doctrine of Sufficiency. Southwest Philosophy Review 30 (2):65-70.
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  46. added 2015-04-06
    Christine Chwaszcza (2014). Intentions in Collective Agency: A Third-Person Approach. In Jörn Müller & Karl Mertens (eds.), Die Dimension des Sozialen: Neue Philosophische Zugänge Zu Fühlen, Wollen Und Handeln. De Gruyter. 263-286.
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  47. added 2015-04-06
    Michael Pauen (2014). Contentsintroductionmorality in Times of Naturalising the Mind – an Overviewpart I: Free Will, Responsibility and the Naturalised Mind1. Naturalizing Free Will – Empirical and Conceptual Issues2. Libet’s Experiments and the Possibility of Free Conscious Decision3. The Effectiveness of Intentions – a Critique of Wegnerpart II: Naturalising Ethics? – Metaethical Perspectives4. Neuroethics and the Rationalism/Sentimentalism Divide5. Experimental Ethics – a Critical Analysispart III: Naturalised Ethics? Empirical Perspectives6. Moral Soulfulness & Moral Hypocrisy – is Scientific Study of Moral Agency Relevant to Ethical Reflection?Part IV: Neuroethics – Which Values?7. The Rationale Behind Surgery –Truth, Facts, Valuesbiographical Notes on the Authorsname Index. [REVIEW] In Christoph Lumer (ed.), Morality in Times of Naturalising the Mind. De Gruyter. 45-62.
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  48. added 2015-04-06
    Paul Weingartner (2014). 15. Whether Nature’s Order and God’s Providence Are Compatible with Free Will. In , Nature's Teleological Order and God's Providence: Are They Compatible with Chance, Free Will, and Evil? De Gruyter. 200-235.
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  49. added 2015-04-06
    Robert Kane (2014). Quantum Physics, Action and Free Will: How Might Free Will Be Possible in a Quantum Universe? In Uwe Meixner & Antonella Corradini (eds.), Quantum Physics Meets the Philosophy of Mind: New Essays on the Mind-Body Relation in Quantum-Theoretical Perspective. De Gruyter. 163-182.
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  50. added 2015-04-06
    Uwe Meixner (2014). Chapter III: On Intending. In , Defending Husserl: A Plea in the Case of Wittgenstein & Company Versus Phenomenology. De Gruyter. 247-350.
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