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  1. Douglass Bailey (2013). Cutting the Earth/Cutting the Body. In Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge.
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  2. Ian Bapty & Tim Yates (eds.) (1990). Archaeology After Structuralism: Post-Structuralism and the Practice of Archaeology. Routledge.
    Introduction: Archaeology and Post-Structuralism Ian Bapty and Tim Yates i If it recedes one day, leaving behind its works and signs on the shores of our ...
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  3. J. A. Bell (forthcoming). Book Review: Can There Be a Philosophy of Archaeology? By William Harvey Krieger. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  4. James A. Bell (2008). Book Review: Krieger, WH (2006). Can There Be a Philosophy of Archaeology? Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (4):560-564.
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  5. Can Bilsel (2012). Antiquity on Display: Regimes of the Authentic in Berlin's Pergamon Museum. Oxford University Press.
    In this volume, Bilsel argues that the museum has produced a modern decor, an iconic image, which has replaced the lost antique originals, rather than creating an explicitly hypothetical representation of Antiquity.
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  6. Lewis Roberts Binford (1983). Working at Archaeology. Academic Press.
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  7. J. L. Bintliff & C. F. Gaffney (eds.) (1986). Archaeology at the Interface: Studies in Archaeology's Relationships with History, Geography, Biology, and Physical Science. B.A.R..
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  8. J. Boardman (1996). Review. Archaeology and Theory. Time, Tradition and Society in Greek Archaeology: Bridging the 'Great Divide'. N Spencer (Ed). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 46 (2):344-345.
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  9. Helga Botermann (1979). Archaeology and History. Philosophy and History 12 (2):213-215.
  10. Mats Burström (2013). Fragments as Something More : Archaeological Experience and Reflection. In Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge. 311.
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  11. Denis Byrne (2013). Days in Hong-Kong, May 2011. In Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge. 258.
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  12. Paul Cartledge (1988). Lakonian Art Maria Pipili: Laconian Iconography of the Sixth Century B.C. (Oxford University Committee for Archaeology, Monograph No. 12.) Pp. V+127; 96 B/W Illustrations, 23 Line Drawings. Oxford: O.U. Committee for Archaeology (Distributed by Oxbow Books), 1987. Paper, £22.00. Marlene Herfort-Koch: Archaische Bronzeplastik Lakoniens. (Münstersche Beiträge Zur Archäologie Boreas, 4.) Pp. 150; 22 Pages of B/W Plates, 6 Figs in Text. Münster: Archäologisches Seminar der Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universitat Munster, 1986. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (02):342-345.
  13. K. R. Dark (2005). Li Lun Kao Gu Xue =. Yue Lu Shu She.
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  14. Helen de Cruz & Johan de Smedt (2007). The Role of Intuitive Ontologies in Scientific Understanding – the Case of Human Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 22 (3):351-368.
    Psychological evidence suggests that laypeople understand the world around them in terms of intuitive ontologies which describe broad categories of objects in the world, such as ‘person’, ‘artefact’ and ‘animal’. However, because intuitive ontologies are the result of natural selection, they only need to be adaptive; this does not guarantee that the knowledge they provide is a genuine reflection of causal mechanisms in the world. As a result, science has parted ways with intuitive ontologies. Nevertheless, since the brain is evolved (...)
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  15. Marcia-Anne Dobres (2000). Technology and Social Agency: Outlining a Practice Framework for Archaeology. Blackwell Publishers.
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  16. Marcia-Anne Dobres & John E. Robb (eds.) (2000). Agency in Archaeology. Routledge.
    Agency in Archaeology is the first critical volume to scrutinize the concept of agency and to examine in-depth its potential to inform our understanding of the past. Theories of agency recognize that human beings make choices, hold intentions and take action. This offers archaeologists scope to move beyond looking at the broad structural or environmental change and instead to consider the individual and the group. The book brings together nineteen internationally renowned scholars who have very different, and often conflicting, stances (...)
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  17. Matt Edgeworth (2013). The Clearing : Archaeology's Way of Opening the World. In Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge.
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  18. Christine Finn (2001). Outside Archaeology: Material Culture and Poetic Imagination. British Archaeological Reports.
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  19. Bárbara Fluxá (2013). New Cultural Landscapes: Archaeological Method as Artistic Practice. In Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge. 103.
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  20. Jean Claude Gardin (1980). Archaeological Constructs: An Aspect of Theoretical Archaeology. Cambridge University Press.
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  21. Andrew Gardner (ed.) (2004). Agency Uncovered: Archaeological Perspectives on Social Agency, Power, and Being Human. Ucl Press.
    This book questions the value of the concept of 'agency', a term used in sociological and philosophical literature to refer to individual free will in archaeology. On the one hand it has been argued that previous generations of archaeologists, in explaining social change in terms of structural or environmental conditions, have lost sight of the 'real people' and reduced them to passive cultural pawns, on the other, introducing the concept of agency to counteract this can be said to perpetuate a (...)
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  22. Guy E. Gibbon (1989). Explanation in Archaeology. Blackwell.
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  23. Roberta Gilchrist (1999). Gender and Archaeology: Contesting the Past. Routledge.
    Is gender determined by biology, society or experience? How have notions of gender and sexuality differed in past societies? Addressing such questions, Gender and Archaeology is the first critical introduction to the field of gender archaeology as it has evolved over the last two decades. It examines the impact of feminist perspectives on archaeology and shows the unique insights that gender archaeology offers on topics like the sexual division of labor, issues of sexuality, and the embodiment of gender identity. A (...)
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  24. Cristóbal Gnecco (2013). Digging Alternative Archaeologies. In Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge.
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  25. Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.) (2013). Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge.
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  26. Gastón Gordillo (2013). Bringing a Place in Ruins Back to Life. In Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge. 323.
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  27. Paul Graves-Brown (2013). Inside is Out : An Epistemology of Surfaces and Substances. In Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge.
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  28. Alejandro Haber (2013). Evestigation, Nomethodology and Deictics : Movements in Un-Disciplining Archaeology. In Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge. 79.
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  29. Martin Hall (2013). Milieux de Mémoire. In Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge. 355.
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  30. Yannis Hamilakis & Efthimis Theou (2013). Enacted Multi-Temporality : The Archaeological Site as a Shared, Performative Space. In Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge. 181.
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  31. E. Harrison (1939). Annals of Archaeology and Anthropology. Vol. Xxv, Nos. 1–2 and 3–4; Vol. Xxvi, Nos. 1–2. Liverpool: University Press, 1938. Paper, 12s. Each Double Number. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (5-6):217-.
  32. Rodney Harrison (2010). After Modernity: Archaeological Approaches to the Contemporary Past. Oxford University Press.
    After Modernity summarizes archaeological approaches to the contemporary past, and suggests a new agenda for the archaeology of late modern societies.
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  33. Almudena Hernando (2013). Change, Individuality and Reason, or, How Archaeology has Legitimized a Patriarchal Modernity. In Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge.
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  34. Ian Hodder (2003). Reading the Past: Current Approaches to Interpretation in Archaeology. Cambridge University Press.
    The third edition of this classic introduction to archaeological theory and method has been fully updated to address the rapid development of theoretical debate throughout the discipline. Ian Hodder and Scott Hutson argue that archaeologists must consider a variety of perspectives in the complex and uncertain task of "translating the meaning of past texts into their own contemporary language". While remaining centered on the importance of meaning, agency and history, the authors explore the latest developments in post-structuralism, neo-evolutionary theory and (...)
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  35. Ian Hodder (ed.) (2001). Archaeological Theory Today. Blackwell Publishers.
    This volume provides an authoritative account of the current status of archaeological theory, as presented by some of its major exponents and innovators over ...
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  36. Ian Hodder (ed.) (1995). Interpreting Archaeology: Finding Meaning in the Past. Routledge.
    Interpretive Archaeologies provides a forum for debate between varied approaches to studying the past. It reflects the profound shift in the direction of archaeological study in the last fifteen years. The book argues that archaeologists must understand their own subjective approaches to the material they study as well as recognize how past researchers imposed their value systems on the evidence they presented. The book's authors, drawn from Europe, North America, Asia and Australasia, represent many different strands of archaeology. They address (...)
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  37. Ian Hodder (ed.) (1987). The Archaeology of Contextual Meanings. Cambridge University Press.
    This companion volume to Archaeology as Long-term History focuses on the symbolism of artefacts. It seeks at once to refine current theory and method relating to interpretation and show, with examples, how to conduct this sort of archaeological work. Some contributors work with the material culture of modern times or the historic period, areas in which the symbolism of mute artefacts has traditionally been thought most accessible. However, the book also contains a good number of applications in prehistory to demonstrate (...)
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  38. Cornelius Holtorf & Graham Fairclough (2013). The New Heritage and Re-Shapings of the Past. In Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge.
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  39. Terry L. Hunt, Carl P. Lipo & Sarah L. Sterling (eds.) (2001). Posing Questions for a Scientific Archaeology. Bergin & Garvey.
    This volume addresses the need to describe the world so that archaeology can have theory built as historical science.
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  40. Ryan Hurd (2011). Integral Archaeology: Process Methodologies for Exploring Prehistoric Rock Art on Ometepe Island, Nicaragua. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):72-94.
    A process-based approach to archaeology combines traditional third-person data collection methods with first- and second-person inquiries. Drawing from the traditions of cognitive archaeology, transpersonal psychology, and ecopsychology, this mixed-methods approach can be thought of as a movement toward a more holistic or “integral” archaeology. By way of example, a prehistoric rock art site on Ometepe Island, Nicaragua is explored from the inside (through the researcher's lucid dreaming incubations) as well as in relationship with the researcher's embodied presence (an exploration of (...)
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  41. R. W. Hutchinson (1939). J. D. S. Pendlebury: The Archaeology of Crete. An Introduction. Pp. Xxix+400; 50 Plates, 53 Text Illustrations, 24 Maps. (Methuen's Handbooks of Archaeology.) London: Methuen, 1939. Cloth, 30s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (04):153-.
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  42. Wendy James & Michael Lambek (2003). The Ceremonial Animal: A New Portrait of Anthropology. OUP Oxford.
    Adapting Wittgenstein's concept of the human species as 'a ceremonial animal', Wendy James writes vividly and readably. Her new overview advocates a clear line of argument: that the concept of social form is a primary key to anthropology and the human sciences as a whole. Weaving memorable ethnographic examples into her text, James brings together carefully selected historical sources as well as references to current ideas in neighbouring disciplines such as archaeology, paleoanthropology, genetics, art and material culture, ethnomusicology, urban and (...)
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  43. Ben Jeffares (2010). Guessing the Future of the Past. Biology and Philosophy 25 (1):125-142.
    I review the book “Making Prehistory: Historical Science and the Scientific Realism Debate” by Derek Turner. Turner suggests that philosophers should take seriously the historical sciences such as geology when considering philosophy of science issues. To that end, he explores the scientific realism debate with the historical sciences in mind. His conclusion is a view allied to that of Arthur Fine: a view Turner calls the natural historical attitude. While I find Turner’s motivations good, I find his characterisation of the (...)
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  44. Ben Jeffares (2010). The Co-Evolution of Tools and Minds: Cognition and Material Culture in the Hominin Lineage. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):503-520.
    The structuring of our environment to provide cues and reminders for ourselves is common: We leave notes on the fridge, we have a particular place for our keys where we deposit them, making them easy to find. We alter our world to streamline our cognitive tasks. But how did hominins gain this capacity? What pushed our ancestors to structure their physical environment in ways that buffered thinking and began the process of using the world cognitively? I argue that the capacity (...)
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  45. Ben Jeffares (2008). Philosophy of Archaeology. In Aviezer Tucker (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to the Philosophies of History and Historiography.
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  46. Ben Jeffares (2005). Regaining Archaeology's Nerve: Culture and Biology in Archaeological Theory. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):545-556.
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  47. Ben Jeffares (2003). The Scope and Limits of Biological Explanations in Archaeology. Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington
    I show how archaeologists have two problems. The construction of scenarios accounting for the raw data of Archaeology, the material remains of the past, and the explanation of pre-history. Within Archaeology, there has been an ongoing debate about how to constrain speculation within both of these archaeological projects, and archaeologists have consistently looked to biological mechanisms for constraints. I demonstrate the problems of using biology, either as an analogy for cultural processes or through direct application of biological principles to material (...)
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  48. Robert J. Jeske & Douglas K. Charles (eds.) (2003). Theory, Method, and Practice in Modern Archaeology. Praeger.
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  49. Matthew Johnson (1999). Archaeological Theory: An Introduction. Blackwell Publishers.
    Common sense is not enough -- The "new archaeology" -- Archaeology as a science -- Middle-range theory, ethnoarchaeology, and material culture studies -- Culture and process -- Thoughts and ideologies -- Postprocessual and interpretative archaeologies -- Archaeology, gender, and identity -- Archaeology and cultural evolution -- Archaeology and Darwinian evolution -- Archaeology and history -- Archaeology, politics and culture -- Conclusion : the future of theory.
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  50. Andrew Jones (2002). Archaeological Theory and Scientific Practice. Cambridge University Press.
    Is archaeology an art or a science? This question has been hotly debated over the last few decades with the rise of archaeological science. At the same time, archaeologists have seen a change in the intellectual character of their discipline, as many writers have adopted approaches influenced by social theory. The discipline now encompasses both archaeological scientists and archaeological theorists, and discussion regarding the status of archaeology remains polarised. Andrew Jones argues that we need to analyse the practice of archaeology. (...)
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