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  1. Marshall Abrams, Does Your Work Have Anything to Do with Normative Issues or Public Policy?
    Sometimes I’m asked whether the things that I’ve been writing about in philosophy of biology have anything to do with normative issues, public policy, etc. The answer is “Yes,” but I don’t think that the reasons why are obvious. Much of my most recent work has focused on metaphysical issues concerning the nature of evolutionary processes. The following is a sketch of some connections between metaphysics, evolution, and normative issues which are of particular interest to me.
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  2. Nicholas Agar (2002). Agar's Review of Katz. Biology and Philosophy 17 (2):301-301.
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  3. Timothy L. Alborn, Elizabeth B. Keeney & Keith R. Benson (1989). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 22 (2):361-371.
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  4. Samuel Alexander (2013). Biologically Unavoidable Sequences. Electronic Journal of Combinatorics 20 (1):1-13.
    A biologically unavoidable sequence is an infinite gender sequence which occurs in every gendered, infinite genealogical network satisfying certain tame conditions. We show that every eventually periodic sequence is biologically unavoidable (this generalizes König's Lemma), and we exhibit some biologically avoidable sequences. Finally we give an application of unavoidable sequences to cellular automata.
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  5. Garland E. Allen (1974). Introduction. Journal of the History of Biology 7 (1):1-3.
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  6. Garland E. Allen, V. B. Smocovitis, Ronald Rainger, Lynn K. Nyhart, Keith R. Benson, Peter G. Sobol & Angela Creager (1993). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 26 (1):147-163.
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  7. Garland Allen & Jane Maienschein (2001). Editors' Introduction. Journal of the History of Biology 34 (1):1-2.
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  8. Anna Andréasson, Anna Jakobsson, Elisabeth Gräslund Berg, Jens Heimdahl, Inger Larsson & Erik Persson (eds.) (2014). Sources to the History of Gardening. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
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  9. Miguel Ángel Medina (2006). The Pursuit of Creativity in Biology. Bioessays 28 (12):1151-1152.
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  10. Julien Arino & Stéphanie Portet (2009). Editorial. Acta Biotheoretica 57 (4):395-396.
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  11. Karen Arnold, James Bogen, Ingo Brigandt, Joe Cain, Paul Griffiths, Catherine Kendig, James Lennox, Alan C. Love, Peter Machamer, Jacqueline Sullivan, Gianmatteo Mameli, Sandra Mitchell, David Papineau, Karola Stotz & D. M. Walsh, Titles and Abstracts for the Pitt-London Workshop in the Philosophy of Biology and Neuroscience: September 2001.
    Titles and abstracts for the Pitt-London Workshop in the Philosophy of Biology and Neuroscience: September 2001.
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  12. Pierre Baconnier & Jacques Viret (1999). Preface. Acta Biotheoretica 47 (3-4):171-172.
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  13. Norman Barraclough (1980). Preology. Distributed by Pergamon Press.
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  14. Mark V. Barrow Jr, Keith R. Benson, Paula Findlen, Deborah Fitzgerald, Joel B. Hagen, Joy Harvey, Sharon E. Kingsland, Jane Maienschein, Gregg Mitman & Lynn K. Nyhart (1996). The JHB Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 29:463-479.
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  15. Mark V. Barrow Jr, Keith R. Benson, Paula Findlen, Michael Fortun, Shirley A. Roe & Joel B. Hagen (1991). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 24 (2):339-351.
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  16. Steven James Bartlett, The Species Problem and its Logic: Inescapable Ambiguity and Framework-Relativity.
    For more than fifty years, taxonomists have proposed numerous alternative definitions of species while they searched for a unique, comprehensive, and persuasive definition. This monograph shows that these efforts have been unnecessary, and indeed have provably been a pursuit of a will o’ the wisp because they have failed to recognize the theoretical impossibility of what they seek to accomplish. A clear and rigorous understanding of the logic underlying species definition leads both to a recognition of the inescapable ambiguity that (...)
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  17. John Beatty (1993). Scientific Collaboration, Internationalism, and Diplomacy: The Case of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 26 (2):205 - 231.
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  18. Enrico Bellone, Livio Gratton, Oddone Longo, Nicola Badaloni, Dieter Wandschneider, Paolo Zellini, Halton C. Arp, Carlo Sini, Jean Heidmann, Jean-Claude Pecker, Fred Hoyle, Jayant V. Narlikar, Geoffrey Burbidge & Umberto Curi (eds.) (1989). Kosmos. La cosmologia tra scienza e filosofia. Corbo.
  19. Niels O. Bernsen & Jan R. Flor (1985). Man's Historicity and Philosophy's Self-Knowledge: Comments on Rorty's Conception of Philosophy. Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 22:37-56.
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  20. J. H. B. Bookshelf Board & Stephen Jay Gould (1991). The JHB Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 24 (1):163-170.
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  21. Liliane Bodson (2002). La Sepulture des Animaux: Concepts, Usages Et Pratiques a Travers le Temps Et L'Espace. Contribution a l'Etude de L'Animalite. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (3/4):552-552.
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  22. Liliane Bodson (1999). Edited volumes-Les animaux exotiques dans Les relations internationaLes. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 21 (2):246.
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  23. Liliane Bodson (1999). Edited volumes-animaux perdus, animaux retrouves: Reapparition ou reintroduction en europe occidentale d'especes disparus de leur milieu d'origine. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 21 (2):246.
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  24. Liliane Bodson (1998). Edited volumes-l'animal de compagnie: Ses roles et leurs motivations au regard de l'histoire. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (3):381.
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  25. Johan Bolhuis (2014). In Grateful Recognition of Our Editorial Board. Bioessays 36 (12):1122-1123.
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  26. Lisa Bortolotti & Ema Sullivan-Bissett (2015). Costs and Benefits of Imperfect Cognitions. Consciousness and Cognition 33:487-489.
    Introduction to a special issue of Consciousness and Cognition on the costs and benefits of imperfect cognitions.
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  27. Tomislav Bracanović (2003). Igor Kardum: Evolucija i ljudsko ponašanje. Prolegomena 2 (2):246-250.
    Review of Igor Kardum's book Evolucija i ljudsko ponašanje (Evolution and Human Behavior).
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  28. Matthew Braddock (2016). Evolutionary Debunking: Can Moral Realists Explain the Reliability of Our Moral Judgments? Philosophical Psychology 29 (6):844-857.
    Evolutionary debunking arguments, notably Sharon Street’s Darwinian Dilemma (2006), allege that moral realists need to explain the reliability of our moral judgments, given their evolutionary sources. David Copp (2008) and David Enoch (2010) take up the challenge. I argue on empirical grounds that realists have not met the challenge and moreover cannot do so. The outcome is that there are empirically-motivated reasons for thinking moral realists cannot explain moral reliability, given our current empirical understanding.
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  29. Matthew Braddock (2009). Evolutionary Psychology's Moral Implications. Biology and Philosophy 24 (4):531-540.
    In this paper, I critically summarize John Cartwrtight’s Evolution and Human Behavior and evaluate what he says about certain moral implications of Darwinian views of human behavior. He takes a Darwinism-doesn’t-rock-the-boat approach and argues that Darwinism, even if it is allied with evolutionary psychology, does not give us reason to be worried about the alterability of our behavior, nor does it give us reason to think that we may have to change our ordinary practices and views concerning free-will and moral (...)
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  30. Matthew Braddock & Alexander Rosenberg (2012). Reconstruction in Moral Philosophy? Analyse & Kritik 34 (1):63-80.
    We raise three issues for Philip Kitcher's "Ethical Project" (2011): First, we argue that the genealogy of morals starts well before the advent of altruism-failures and the need to remedy them, which Kitcher dates at about 50K years ago. Second, we challenge the likelihood of long term moral progress of the sort Kitcher requires to establish objectivity while circumventing Hume's challenge to avoid trying to derive normative conclusions from positive ones--'ought' from 'is'. Third, we sketch ways in which Kitcher's metaethical (...)
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  31. Ingo Brigandt (2011). Philosophy of Biology. In Steven French & Juha Saatsi (eds.), The Continuum Companion to the Philosophy of Science. Continuum Press 246--267.
    This overview of philosophy of biology lays out what implications biology and recent philosophy of biology have for general philosophy of science. The following topics are addressed in five sections: natural kinds, conceptual change, discovery and confirmation, explanation and reduction, and naturalism.
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  32. Berit Brogaard (2004). Species as Individuals. Biology and Philosophy 19 (2):223-242.
    There is no question that the constituents of cells and organisms are joined together by the part-whole relation. Genes are part of cells, and cells are part of organisms. Species taxa, however, have traditionally been conceived of, not as wholes with parts, but as classes with members. But why does the relation change abruptly from part-whole to class-membership above the level of organisms? Ghiselin, Hull and others have argued that it doesn't. Cells and organisms are cohesive mereological sums, and since (...)
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  33. Silvia Bulfone‐Paus, Elena Bulanova, Vadim Budagian & Ralf Paus (2011). Expression of Concern. Bioessays 33 (8):647-647.
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  34. Richard M. Burian (1993). How the Choice of Experimental Organism Matters: Epistemological Reflections on an Aspect of Biological Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 26 (2):351 - 367.
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  35. Richard M. Burian & Marjorie Grene (1992). Editorial Introduction: Philosophy of Biology in Historical and Cultural Contexts. Synthese 91 (1-2):1-7.
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  36. Brett Calcott, Arnon Levy, Mark L. Siegal, Orkun S. Soyer & Andreas Wagner (2015). Engineering and Biology: Counsel for a Continued Relationship. Biological Theory 10 (1):50-59.
    Biologists frequently draw on ideas and terminology from engineering. Evolutionary systems biology—with its circuits, switches, and signal processing—is no exception. In parallel with the frequent links drawn between biology and engineering, there is ongoing criticism against this cross-fertilization, using the argument that over-simplistic metaphors from engineering are likely to mislead us as engineering is fundamentally different from biology. In this article, we clarify and reconfigure the link between biology and engineering, presenting it in a more favorable light. We do so (...)
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  37. Werner Callebaut (2005). Again, What the Philosophy of Biology is Not. Acta Biotheoretica 53 (2):93-122.
    There are many things that philosophy of biology might be. But, given the existence of a professional philosophy of biology that is arguably a progressive research program and, as such, unrivaled, it makes sense to define philosophy of biology more narrowly than the totality of intersecting concerns biologists and philosophers (let alone other scholars) might have. The reasons for the success of the “new” philosophy of biology remain poorly understood. I reflect on what Dutch and Flemish, and, more generally, European (...)
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  38. Marcelo R. De Carvalho & Malte C. Ebach (2009). Death of the Specialist, Rise of the Machinist. Letter to the Editor. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 31 (3/4):461 - 463.
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  39. Gwendolyn Cazander, David I. Pritchard, Yamni Nigam, Willi Jung & Peter H. Nibbering (unknown). Prospects & Overviews. Bioessays 35:0000-0000.
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  40. Marc Champagne (2011). Axiomatizing Umwelt Normativity. Sign Systems Studies 39 (11):9-59.
    Prompted by the thesis that an organism’s umwelt possesses not just a descriptive dimension, but a normative one as well, some have sought to annex semiotics with ethics. Yet the pronouncements made in this vein have consisted mainly in rehearsing accepted moral intuitions, and have failed to concretely further our knowledge of why or how a creature comes to order objects in its environment in accordance with axiological charges of value or disvalue. For want of a more explicit account, theorists (...)
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  41. Marc Champagne (2009). A Note on M. Barbieri's "Scientific Biosemiotics". American Journal of Semiotics 25 (1-2):155-161.
    A densely-packed critique of some current trends in semiotics.
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  42. Huabao Chen, Chunping Yang, Kai Shu, Wenming Wang, Zhaojun Li, Guoshu Gong & Min Zhang, Leaf Extract of Eupatorium Adenophorum Negatively Regulates Growth of Alternanthera Philoxeroides.
    Allelopathy is an important biological phenomenon in exotic plant invasions. Studies about this phenomenon can help us to understand how plant interactions influence plant colony and ecosystem functioning. Both alligator weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides, Ap) and crofton weed (Eupatorium adenophorum, Ea) are important destructive exotic species in China. Their allelopathic effects on native plant species are well documented. However, whether alligator weed and crofton weed antagonize each other regarding plant growth? There is largely unknown currently. Here we report that the leaf (...)
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  43. Jidong Chen (2012). She From Bookshelf Take-Descend-Come the Box. In Anetta Kopecka & Bhuvana Narasimhan (eds.), Events of "Putting" and "Taking": A Crosslinguistic Perspective. John Benjamins Pub. Co. 100--37.
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  44. Eugene Cittadino, Ronald Rainger, Kieth R. Benson & Virginia P. Dawson (1990). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 23 (1):155-162.
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  45. S. R. L. Clark (2005). Review: Can a Darwinian Be a Christian? The Relationship Between Science and Religion. [REVIEW] Mind 114 (455):773-777.
  46. Stephen R. L. Clark (2000). Biology and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This stimulating and wide-ranging book mounts a profound enquiry into some of the most pressing questions of our age, by examining the relationship between biological science and Christianity. The history of biological discovery is explored from the point of view of a leading philosopher and ethicist. What effect should modern biological theory and practice have on Christian understanding of ethics? How much of that theory and practice should Christians endorse? Can Christians, for example, agree that biological changes are not governed (...)
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  47. Stephen R. L. Clark (1993). Does the Burgess Shale Have Moral Implications? Inquiry 36 (4):357 – 380.
    Stephen Jay Gould's Wonderful Life is a study of the fossils of the Burgess Shale of British Columbia. My concern is with the morals that Gould draws, with the ?new picture of life? that, he says, the reinterpreted Burgess animals compel. I conclude that his case is not established. (1) There may have been reasons to do with ?fitness? why most of the Burgess animals left no descendants, even if we cannot guess exactly what they were. (2) We do not (...)
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  48. Ellen Clarke (2015). Philosophy of Microbiology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2015.
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  49. Alix Cooper, Elizabeth Hanson, Kathy J. Cooke & Angela N. H. Creager (1997). The J. H. B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 30 (1):135-144.
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  50. Lindsay R. Craig (2010). Gerd B. Müller and Massimo Pigliucci—Extended Synthesis: Theory Expansion or Alternative? Biological Theory 5 (4):395-396.
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