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  1. F. Michael Akeroyd (2008). Mechanistic Explanation Versus Deductive-Nomological Explanation. Foundations of Chemistry 10 (1):39-48.
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  2. F. Michael Akeroyd (2000). The Foundations of Modern Organic Chemistry: The Rise of the Highes and Ingold Theory From 1930–1942. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 2 (2):99-125.
    The foundations of modern organic chemistry were laid by the seminal work of Hughes and Ingold. The rise from being an interesting alternative hypothesis in 1933 to being the leading theory (outside the USA) in 1942 was achieved by a multiplicity of methods. This include:the construction of a new scientific notation, the rationalisation of some seemingly contradictory reported data, the refutation of the experimental work of one of their persistent critics, the use of conceptual arguments and also the achievement of (...)
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  3. F. Michael Akeroyd (1997). Conceptual Aspects of Theory Appraisal: Some Biochemical Examples. Hyle 3 (1):95 - 102.
    This paper considers papers on conceptual analysis by Laudan (1981) and Whitt (1989) and relates them to three biochemical episodes: (1) the modern 'biochemical explanation' of acupuncture; (2) the chemio-osmotic hypothesis of oxidative phosphorylation; (3) the theory of the complete digestion of proteins in the gut. The advantages of including philosophical debate in chemical/biochemical undergraduate courses is then discussed.
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  4. Shawn B. Allin (2003). Cathy Cobb: Magick, Mayhem, and Mavericks: The Spirited History of Physical Chemistry. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 5 (3):249-252.
  5. Robert Anderson (2012). Early Railway Chemistry and Its Legacy. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 45 (4):688-690.
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  6. Roberta Brayner Anne Aimable, Mathieu Roze Jean-Pierre Llored & Stephane Sarrade (2013). Chemistry and Interfaces. In Jean-Pierre Llored (ed.), The Philosophy of Chemistry: Practices, Methodologies, and Concepts. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
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  7. Davis Baird (2000). Encapsulating Knowledge: The Direct Reading Spectrometer. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 2 (1):5-46.
    The direct reading emission spectrometer was developed during the1940s. By substituting photo-multiplier tubes and electronics forphotographic film spectrograms, the interpretation of special lineswith a densitometer was avoided. Instead, the instrument providedthe desired information concerning percentage concentration ofelements of interest directly on a dial. Such instruments `de-skill' the job of making such measurements. They do this by encapsulatingin the instrument the skills previously employed by the analyst,by `skilling' the instrument. This paper presents a history of thedevelopment of the Dow Chemical/Baird Associates (...)
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  8. Davis Baird, Eric R. Scerri & Lee C. McIntyre (eds.) (2006). Philosophy of Chemistry: Synthesis of a New Discipline. Springer.
    This comprehensive volume marks a new standard in scholarship in the still emerging field of the philosophy of chemistry. With selections drawn from a wide range of scholarly disciplines, philosophers, chemists, and historians of science here converge to ask some of the most fundamental questions about the relationship between philosophy and chemistry. What can chemistry teach us about longstanding disputes in the philosophy of science over such issues as reductionism, autonomy, and supervenience? And what new issues may chemistry bring to (...)
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  9. A. T. Balaban (2005). Reflections About Mathematical Chemistry. Foundations of Chemistry 7 (3):289-306.
    A personal account is presented for the present status of mathematical chemistry, with emphasis on non-numerical applications. These use mainly graph-theoretical concepts. Most computational chemical applications involve quantum chemistry and are therefore largely reducible to physics, while discrete mathematical applications often do not. A survey is provided for opinions and definitions of mathematical chemistry, and then for journals, books and book series, as well as symposia of mathematical chemistry.
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  10. Claudette Balpe (1999). Constitution d'Un Enseignement Expérimental: La Physique Et Chimie Dans les Écoles Centrales/The Constitution of the Teaching of Experimental Science: Physics and Chemistry in the Écoles Centrales. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 52 (2):241-284.
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  11. Claudette Balpe (1999). The Constitution of the Teaching of Experimental Science: Physics and Chemistry in the Ecoles Centrales. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 52 (2):241-284.
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  12. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2014). From Corpuscles to Elements: Chemical Ontologies From Van Helmon to Lavoisier. In Lee McIntyre & Eric Scerri (eds.), Philosophy of Chemistry: Growth of a New Discipline. Springer. 141-154.
  13. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2013). The Relevance of Boyle's Chemical Philosophy for Contemporary Philosophy of Chemistry. In Jean-Pierre Llored (ed.), The Philosophy of Chemistry: Practices, Methodologies, and Concepts.
  14. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2011). Ontological Tensions in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Chemistry: Between Mechanism and Vitalism. Foundations of Chemistry 13 (3):173-186.
    The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries marks a period of transition between the vitalistic ontology that had dominated Renaissance natural philosophy and the Early Modern mechanistic paradigm endorsed by, among others, the Cartesians and Newtonians. This paper will focus on how the tensions between vitalism and mechanism played themselves out in the context of sixteenth and seventeenth century chemistry and chemical philosophy, particularly in the works of Paracelsus, Jan Baptista Van Helmont, Robert Fludd, and Robert Boyle. Rather than argue that these (...)
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  15. A. Barry (2005). Pharmaceutical Matters: The Invention of Informed Materials. Theory, Culture and Society 22 (1):51-69.
    Drawing on the work of Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent and Isabelle Stengers on the history of chemistry, this article develops the idea that drug molecules can be understood as ‘informed materials’. This study argues that molecules should not be viewed as discrete objects, but as constituted in their relations to complex informational and material environments. Through a case study of commercial pharmaceutical R&D, the article examines the role of combinatorial and computational chemistry in enriching the informational and material environment of potential drug (...)
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  16. Elia Ben-Ari (2008). Better Communicating Through Chemistry. BioScience 58 (3):280.
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  17. Theodor Benfey (2000). Reflections on the Philosophy of Chemistry and a Rallying Call for Our Discipline. Foundations of Chemistry 2 (3):195-205.
    Biology in the popular mind remains tied to the doctrines of the struggle forsurvival and the survival of the fittest. Physics is linked to the heat deathof the universe – the inexorable march towards greater disorder,increasing entropy. Our field, on the other hand, focuses on orderedstructures, molecules and crystals, and their aggregates, and what holdsthem together. The philosophy of chemistry is centered on affinity,cohesion, the architecture of the very small, attraction, harmony, and, ifyou permit, beauty. Our discipline is the voice (...)
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  18. Juan Bautista Bengoetxea (2002). Of Minds and Molecules. New Philosophical Perspectives on Chemistry. Theoria 17 (1):191-193.
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  19. Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent (2010). Atomism and Positivism: A Legend About French Chemistry. Annals of Science 56 (1):81-94.
    The strong opposition of nineteenth-century French chemists to atomism is usually described as a national attitude due to the overarching influence of positivism in France. The explanation sounds plausible, at first glance. However, the idea that a philosophy of science acted as an obstacle to the advancement of science needs further investigation. What is meant exactly by a philosophical influence on a scientific community? In analysing the alleged influence of positivism on the chemists' community it is argued that the common (...)
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  20. Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent (2008). Matière à Penser: Essais d'Histoire Et de Philosophie de la Chimie. Presses Universitaires de Paris Ouest.
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  21. Jerome A. Berson (2003). Chemical Discovery and the Logicians' Program a Problematic Pairing. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  22. Gwenael Berthet & Jean-Baptiste Renard (2013). Chemistry of the Stratosphere: Metrological Insights and Reflection About Interdisciplinary Practical Networks. In Jean-Pierre Llored (ed.), The Philosophy of Chemistry: Practices, Methodologies, and Concepts. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
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  23. Nalini Bhushan (2004). Introduction. Foundations of Chemistry 6 (1):3-9.
  24. Nalini Bhushan & Stuart M. Rosenfeld (eds.) (2000). Of Minds and Molecules: New Philosophical Perspectives on Chemistry. Oxford University Press.
    Of Minds and Molecules is the first anthology devoted exclusively to work in the philosophy of chemistry. The essays, written by both chemists and philosophers, adopt distinctive philosophical perspectives on chemistry and collectively offer both a conceptualization of and a justification for this emerging field.
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  25. John E. Bloor (2002). Ronald J. Gillespie and Paul L. A. Popelier: Chemical Bonding and Molecular Geometry: From Lewis to Electron Densities. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 4 (3):241-247.
  26. Paul A. Bogaard (2006). After Substance: How Aristotle's Question Still Bears on the Philosophy of Chemistry. Philosophy of Science 73 (5):853-863.
    This article will explore whether there are arguments for Aristotle's concept mixis which can aid our current discussions within the philosophy of chemistry. We remain troubled by the way and extent to which chemical substance in bulk can be identified with or reduced to the stability and structure of molecules, and whether these in turn can be identified with or reduced to elemental atoms and the quantum theoretical characterization of their electrons. Aristotle was as determined as we are to think (...)
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  27. J. Van Brakel (1997). Chemistry as the Science of the Transformation of Substances. Synthese 111 (3):253 - 282.
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  28. J. Brakevanl (1997). Chemistry as the Science of the Transformation of Substances. Synthese 111 (3):253-282.
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  29. Anastasios Brenner & François Henn (2013). Chemistry and French Philosophy of Science. A Comparison of Historical and Contemporary Views. In Hanne Andersen, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao González, Thomas Uebel & Gregory Wheeler (eds.), New Challenges to Philosophy of Science. Springer Verlag. 387--398.
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  30. W. H. Brock (1992). Ideas in Chemistry. A History of the Science, by David M. Knight. History of Science 30:439-442.
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  31. W. H. Brock (1986). Recent Developments in the History of Chemistry. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 19 (3):358-359.
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  32. W. H. Brock (1968). An Attempt to Establish the First Principles of the History of Chemistry. History of Science 6:156.
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  33. John Hedley Brooke (1995). Thinking About Matter: Studies in the History of Chemical Philosophy. Variorum.
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  34. Nathan M. Brooks (2006). Russian Chemistry in the 1850s: A Failed Attempt at Institutionalization. Annals of Science 52 (6):577-589.
    This paper examines the efforts of two young Russian chemists during the late 1850s and early 1860s to establish a professional chemistry journal and a public laboratory for chemistry research in Russia. These two, N. N. Sokolov and A. N. Engel' gardt, were important participants in the early efforts to institutionalize and professionalize chemistry in Russia. However, both the chemistry laboratory and the chemistry journal ended after only a few years. The chemistry journal was curtailed not because of Government interference, (...)
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  35. S. Bucchi (1995). Chemistry and Mental-Science in English-the Example of Mill, James. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 50 (1):31-40.
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  36. Mario Bunge (1982). Is Chemistry a Branch of Physics? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 13 (2):209-223.
    Summary Opinion is divided as to whether chemistry is reducible to physics. The problem can be given a satisfactory solution provided three conditions are met: that a science not be identified with its theories; that several notions of theory dependence be distinguished; and that quantum chemistry, rather than classical chemistry, be compared with physics. This paper proposes to perform all three tasks. It does so by analyzing the methodological concepts concerned as well as by examining the way a chemical rate (...)
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  37. Neil A. Campbell (1986). Crossing the Boundaries of Science Applying Chemistry and Physics to Study Biological Molecules, Linus Pauling has Shown Us That No Discipline is an Island. BioScience 36 (11):737-739.
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  38. Liberato Cardellini (2008). The Views and Influence of Ernst Von Glasersfeld: An Introduction. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 10 (2):129-134.
    Research into learners' ideas about science suggests that students often have alternative conceptions about important science concepts. Because of this dissatisfaction, constructivism has been adopted as a theoretical framework by many teachers and researchers, and it has had a curricular influence in many countries. Constructivism is much more than an educational doctrine and we are aware that a ‘science war’ about the possibility of objectivity is in progress. ‘Constructivism’ cannot necessary be a package deal: it must be possible to accept (...)
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  39. Liberato Cardellini (2006). The Foundations of Radical Constructivism: An Interview with Ernst Von Glasersfeld. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 8 (2):177-187.
    Constructivism rejects the metaphysical position that “truth”, and thus knowledge in science, can represent an “objective” reality, independent of the knower. It modifies the role of knowledge from “true” representation to functional viability. In this interview, Ernst von Glasersfeld, the leading proponent of Radical Constructivism underlines the inaccessibility of reality, and proposes his view that the function of cognition is adaptive, in the biological sense: the adaptation is the result of the elimination of all that is not adapted. There is (...)
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  40. Sarah Carvallo (2010). A Controversy Well Beyond Medicine and Chemistry. In Marcelo Dascal (ed.), The Practice of Reason: Leibniz and His Controversies. John Benjamins Pub. Co.. 7--101.
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  41. Krishna Chaitanya (1972). The Physics and Chemistry of Freedom. Bombay,Somaiya Publications.
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  42. Hasok Chang (2011). Compositionism as a Dominant Way of Knowing in Modern Chemistry. History of Science 49 (3):247-268.
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  43. Michael Chayut (2001). From the Periphery: The Genesis of Eugene P. Wigner's Application of Group Theory to Quantum Mechanics. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 3 (1):55-78.
    This paper traces the origins of Eugene Wigner's pioneering application of group theory to quantum physics to his early work in chemistry and crystallography. In the early 1920s, crystallography was the only discipline in which symmetry groups were routinely used. Wigner's early training in chemistry, and his work in crystallography with Herman Mark and Karl Weissenberg at the Kaiser Wilhelm institute for fiber research in Berlin exposed him to conceptual tools which were absent from the pedagogy available to physicists for (...)
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  44. Pedro Cintas (2002). On the Origin of Tetrahedral Carbon: A Case for Philosophy of Chemistry? [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 4 (2):149-161.
    This essay analyzes the historical and philosophical context that led to the basic concepts of stereochemistry proposed by Van’t Hoff and Le Bel. Although it is now well established that the key idea of tetrahedral carbon, and in general a geometric view of matter, was pioneered by other chemists, Van’t Hoff and Le Bel used this idea to solve the puzzle of optical activity, thereby establishing a direct linkage between structure and physical properties. It is also interesting to note that (...)
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  45. Antonio Clericuzio (2010). “Sooty Empiricks” and Natural Philosophers: The Status of Chemistry in the Seventeenth Century. Science in Context 23 (3):329-350.
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  46. Allison Coudert (2006). Distilling Knowledge: Alchemy, Chemistry, and the Scientific Revolution. [REVIEW] The Medieval Review 9.
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  47. Maurice Crosland (2003). Difficult Beginnings in Experimental Science at Oxford: The Gothic Chemistry Laboratory. Annals of Science 60 (4):399-421.
    A curious appendage to the Oxford Museum of Natural History has an interesting history. Although, in its original form, its architecture may have suggested a chapel, it was built as a chemical laboratory in the 1850s. Was its Gothic style an idle fancy, or was it intended to contribute to some grand design? The choice of architectural style may suggest a purely aesthetic interpretation. Alternatively the high roof and ventilation of the laboratory points to a purely utilitarian purpose. Yet neither (...)
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  48. D. Ward Cutler (1933). The Chemistry and Physics of Contraceptives. The Eugenics Review 25 (2):110.
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  49. William J. Danaher (1988). Insight in Chemistry. University Press of America.
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  50. Allen G. Debus (1963). A History of Chemistry, II. History of Science 2:165.
1 — 50 / 384