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  1. Davis Baird, Eric R. Scerri & Lee C. McIntyre (eds.) (2006). Philosophy of Chemistry: Synthesis of a New Discipline. Springer.
    This comprehensive volume marks a new standard in scholarship in the still emerging field of the philosophy of chemistry. With selections drawn from a wide range of scholarly disciplines, philosophers, chemists, and historians of science here converge to ask some of the most fundamental questions about the relationship between philosophy and chemistry. What can chemistry teach us about longstanding disputes in the philosophy of science over such issues as reductionism, autonomy, and supervenience? And what new issues may chemistry bring to (...)
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  2. A. T. Balaban (2005). Reflections About Mathematical Chemistry. Foundations of Chemistry 7 (3):289-306.
    A personal account is presented for the present status of mathematical chemistry, with emphasis on non-numerical applications. These use mainly graph-theoretical concepts. Most computational chemical applications involve quantum chemistry and are therefore largely reducible to physics, while discrete mathematical applications often do not. A survey is provided for opinions and definitions of mathematical chemistry, and then for journals, books and book series, as well as symposia of mathematical chemistry.
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  3. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2013). The Relevance of Boyle's Chemical Philosophy for Contemporary Philosophy of Chemistry. In Jean-Pierre Llored (ed.), The Philosophy of Chemistry: Practices, Methodologies, and Concepts.
  4. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2011). Ontological Tensions in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Chemistry: Between Mechanism and Vitalism. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 13 (3):173-186.
    The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries marks a period of transition between the vitalistic ontology that had dominated Renaissance natural philosophy and the Early Modern mechanistic paradigm endorsed by, among others, the Cartesians and Newtonians. This paper will focus on how the tensions between vitalism and mechanism played themselves out in the context of sixteenth and seventeenth century chemistry and chemical philosophy, particularly in the works of Paracelsus, Jan Baptista Van Helmont, Robert Fludd, and Robert Boyle. Rather than argue that these (...)
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  5. Theodor Benfey (2000). Reflections on the Philosophy of Chemistry and a Rallying Call for Our Discipline. Foundations of Chemistry 2 (3):195-205.
    Biology in the popular mind remains tied to the doctrines of the struggle forsurvival and the survival of the fittest. Physics is linked to the heat deathof the universe – the inexorable march towards greater disorder,increasing entropy. Our field, on the other hand, focuses on orderedstructures, molecules and crystals, and their aggregates, and what holdsthem together. The philosophy of chemistry is centered on affinity,cohesion, the architecture of the very small, attraction, harmony, and, ifyou permit, beauty. Our discipline is the voice (...)
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  6. Paul A. Bogaard (2006). After Substance: How Aristotle's Question Still Bears on the Philosophy of Chemistry. Philosophy of Science 73 (5):853-863.
    This article will explore whether there are arguments for Aristotle's concept mixis which can aid our current discussions within the philosophy of chemistry. We remain troubled by the way and extent to which chemical substance in bulk can be identified with or reduced to the stability and structure of molecules, and whether these in turn can be identified with or reduced to elemental atoms and the quantum theoretical characterization of their electrons. Aristotle was as determined as we are to think (...)
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  7. Mario Bunge (1982). Is Chemistry a Branch of Physics? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 13 (2):209-223.
    Summary Opinion is divided as to whether chemistry is reducible to physics. The problem can be given a satisfactory solution provided three conditions are met: that a science not be identified with its theories; that several notions of theory dependence be distinguished; and that quantum chemistry, rather than classical chemistry, be compared with physics. This paper proposes to perform all three tasks. It does so by analyzing the methodological concepts concerned as well as by examining the way a chemical rate (...)
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  8. Liberato Cardellini (2008). The Views and Influence of Ernst Von Glasersfeld: An Introduction. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 10 (2):129-134.
    Research into learners' ideas about science suggests that students often have alternative conceptions about important science concepts. Because of this dissatisfaction, constructivism has been adopted as a theoretical framework by many teachers and researchers, and it has had a curricular influence in many countries. Constructivism is much more than an educational doctrine and we are aware that a ‘science war’ about the possibility of objectivity is in progress. ‘Constructivism’ cannot necessary be a package deal: it must be possible to accept (...)
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  9. Liberato Cardellini (2006). The Foundations of Radical Constructivism: An Interview with Ernst Von Glasersfeld. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 8 (2):177-187.
    Constructivism rejects the metaphysical position that “truth”, and thus knowledge in science, can represent an “objective” reality, independent of the knower. It modifies the role of knowledge from “true” representation to functional viability. In this interview, Ernst von Glasersfeld, the leading proponent of Radical Constructivism underlines the inaccessibility of reality, and proposes his view that the function of cognition is adaptive, in the biological sense: the adaptation is the result of the elimination of all that is not adapted. There is (...)
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  10. Joseph E. Earley (2006). Some Philosophical Influences on Ilya Prigogine's Statistical Mechanics. Foundations of Chemistry 8 (3):271-283.
    During a long and distinguished career, Belgian physical chemist Ilya Prigogine (1917–2003) pursued a coherent research program in thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and related scientific areas. The main goal of this effort was establishing the origin of thermodynamic irreversibility (the ‘‘arrow of time’’) as local (residing in the details of the interaction of interest), rather than as global (being solely a consequence of properties of the initial singularity – the ‘‘Big Bang’’). In many publications for general audiences, he stated the opinion (...)
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  11. Joseph E. Earley (2004). Would Introductory Chemistry Courses Work Better with a New Philosophical Basis? Foundations of Chemistry 6 (3):137-160.
    One of the main functions that introductory chemistry courses havefulfilled during the past century has been to provide evidence for the generalvalidity of 'the atomic hypothesis.' A second function has been to demonstratethat an analytical approach has wide applicability in rationalizing many kindsof phenomena. Following R.G. Collingwood, these two functions can be recognizedas related to a philosophical 'cosmology' (worldview, weltanshauung) thatbecame dominant in the late Renaissance. Recent developments in many areasof science, and in chemistry, have emphasized the central importance of (...)
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  12. Mark Eberhart (2002). Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Design in the Twenty First Century. Foundations of Chemistry 4 (3):201-211.
    It is argued that the conventional descriptions of chemical bonds as covalent, ionic, metallic, and Van der Waals are compromising the usefulness of quantum mechanics in the synthesis and design of new molecules and materials. Parallels are drawn between the state of chemistry now and when the idea that phlogiston was an element impeded the development of chemistry. Overcoming the current obstacles will require new methods to describe molecular structure and bonding, just as new concepts were needed before the phlogiston (...)
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  13. M. D. Eddy (2004). Elements, Principles and the Narrative of Affinity. Foundations of Chemistry 6 (2):161-175.
    In the 18th century, the concept of ‘affinity’, ‘principle’ and ‘element’ dominated chemical discourse, both inside and outside the laboratory. Although much work has been done on these terms and the methodological commitments which guided their usage, most studies over the past two centuries have concentrated on their application as relevant to Lavoisier's oxygen theory and the new nomenclature. Kim's affinity challenges this historiographical trajectory by looking at several French chemists in the light of their private thoughts, public disputations and (...)
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  14. Sibel Erduran (2007). Breaking the Law: Promoting Domain-Specificity in Chemical Education in the Context of Arguing About the Periodic Law. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 9 (3):247-263.
    In this paper, domain-specificity is presented as an understudied problem in chemical education. This argument is unpacked by drawing from two bodies of literature: learning of science and epistemology of science, both themes that have cognitive as well as philosophical undertones. The wider context is students’ engagement in scientific inquiry, an important goal for science education and one that has not been well executed in everyday classrooms. The focus on science learning illustrates the role of domain specificity in scientific reasoning. (...)
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  15. Pio García (2009). Discovery by Serendipity: A New Context for an Old Riddle. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 11 (1):33-42.
    In the last years there has been a great improvement in the development of computational methods for combinatorial chemistry applied to drug discovery. This approach to drug discovery is sometimes called a “rational way” to manage a well known phenomenon in chemistry: serendipity discoveries. Traditionally, serendipity discoveries are understood as accidental findings made when the discoverer is in quest for something else. This ‘traditional’ pattern of serendipity appears to be a good characterization of discoveries where “luck” plays a key role. (...)
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  16. Robert J. Good (1999). Why Are Chemists 'Turned Off' by Philosophy of Science? Foundations of Chemistry 1 (2):65-95.
    The most immediate reason why chemists are unenthusiastic about the philosophy of science is the historic hostility of important philosophers, to the concept of atoms. (Without atoms, discovery in chemistry would have proceeded with glacial slowness, if at all, in the last 200 years.) Other important reasons include the anti-realist influence of the philosophical dogmas of logical positivism, instrumentalism, of strict empiricism. Though (as has been said) these doctrines have recently gone out of fashion, they are still very influential.A diagram (...)
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  17. Rom Harré (2009). Trope Theory and the Ontology of Chemistry. Foundations of Chemistry 11 (2):93-103.
    The traditional ontology within which chemistry has developed involved various versions of a general substance/attribute scheme. Recently this has been challenged by two versions of Dynamism. One version is derived from the writings of A. N. Whitehead and the other from several sources, including G. Leibniz and I. Kant. Both involve the idea of flux of actual occasions. Unlike the former scheme, the latter involves a foundation of causal powers and the energetics of field theory. The situation has been made (...)
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  18. Robin Hendry (2010). The Elements and Conceptual Change. In Helen Beebee & Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (eds.), The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds. Routledge.
  19. Robin Findlay Hendry (2005). Book Review: Jaap Van Brakel: Philosophy of Chemistry: Between the Manifest and the Scientific Image Leuven University Press, Leuven, 2000, XIV + 246 Pp., ISBN 90-5867-063-. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 7 (2):187-197.
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  20. Klaus Hentschel (2002). Why Not One More Imponderable? John William Draper's Tithonic Rays. Foundations of Chemistry 4 (1):5-59.
    This paper reconstructs what may have led the American professorof chemistry andnatural philosophy John William Draper to introduce a new kind ofradiation, whichhe dubbed `Tithonic rays''. After presenting his and earlierempirical findings onthe chemical action of light in Section 3, I analyze his pertinentpapers in Section 4with the aim of identifying the various types of argumentshe raised infavor of this new actinic entity (or more precisely, this newnatural kind of raybesides optical, thermal and perhaps also phosphorogenic rays).From a modernperspective, all (...)
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  21. Roald Hoffmann (2012). Roald Hoffmann on the Philosophy, Art, and Science of Chemistry. Oxford University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction, by Michael Weisberg and Jeffrey Kovac. -- 1 Trying to Understand, Making Bonds, by Roald Hoffmann -- Part 1: Chemical Reasoning and Explanation -- 2. Why Buy That Theory?, by Roald Hoffmann. -- 3. What Might Philosophy of Science Look Like If Chemists Built It?, by Roald Hoffmann -- 4. Unstable, by Roald Hoffmann -- 5. Nearly Circular Reasoning, by Roald Hoffmann -- 6. Ockham's Razor and Chemistry, by Roald Hoffmann, (...)
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  22. Roald Hoffmann (2007). What Might Philosophy of Science Look Like If Chemists Built It? Synthese 155 (3):321 - 336.
    Had more philosophers of science come from chemistry, their thinking would have been different. I begin by looking at a typical chemical paper, in which making something is the leitmotif, and conjecture/refutation is pretty much irrelevant. What in fact might have been, might be, different? The realism of chemists is reinforced by their remarkable ability to transform matter; they buy into reductionism where it serves them, but make no real use of it. Incommensurability is taken without a blink, and actually (...)
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  23. Roald Hoffmann (2004). Theoretical Chemistry. Foundations of Chemistry 6 (1):11-.
  24. Claus Jacob (2007). The Closure of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Exeter – an Insider's View. Foundations of Chemistry 9 (1):57-64.
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  25. Claus Jacob (2002). Philosophy and Biochemistry: Research at the Interface Between Chemistry and Biology. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 4 (2):97-125.
    This paper investigates the interface between philosophy and biochemistry. While it is problematic to justify the application of a particular philosophical model to biochemistry, it seems to be even more difficult to develop a special “Philosophy for Biochemistry”. Alternatively, philosophy can be used in biochemistry based on an alternative approach that involves an interdependent iteration process at a philosophical and (bio)chemical level (“Exeter Method”). This useful iteration method supplements more abstract approaches at the interface between philosophy and natural sciences, and (...)
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  26. Rosária S. Justi & John K. Gilbert (2002). Philosophy of Chemistry in University Chemical Education: The Case of Models and Modelling. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 4 (3):213-240.
    If chemistry is to be taught successfully, teachers must have a good subject matter knowledge (SK) of the ideas with which they are dealing, the nature of this falling within the orbit of philosophy of chemistry. They must also have a good pedagogic content knowledge (PCK), the ability to communicate SK to students, the nature of this falling within the philosophy and psychology of chemical education. Taking the case of models and modelling, important themes in the philosophy of chemistry, an (...)
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  27. Masanori Kaji (2003). Mendeleev's Discovery of the Periodic Law: The Origin and the Reception. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 5 (3):189-214.
    This paper addresses the conceptual as well as social origins of Mendeleev’s discovery of the periodic law and its reception by the chemical community by taking account of three factors: Mendeleev’s early research and its relevance to the discovery; his concepts of chemistry, especially that of the chemical elements; and the social context of the discovery and the reception in the chemical community. Mendeleev's clear distinction between abstract elements and simple bodies was a departure from Lavoisier’s famous definition of elements (...)
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  28. George B. Kauffman (2005). Book Review: Fathi Habashi: From Alchemy to Atomic Bombs: History of Chemistry, Metallurgy, and Civilization. Métallurgie Extractive Québec: 800 Rue Alain #504, Sainte Foy, Québec, Canada G1x 4e7, 2002; Distributed by Laval University Bookstore “Zone”: Cité Universitaire, Sainte Foy, Québec, Canada G1k 7p4, VIII + 357 Pp, Can.70.00; U.S.70.00; U.S.50.00; Plus Postage (Hardbound); ISBN 2-922-686-00-. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 7 (2):183-186.
  29. M. Kidwai & R. Mohan (2005). Green Chemistry: An Innovative Technology. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 7 (3):269-287.
    The drive towards clean technology in the chemical industry with an increasing emphasis on the reduction of waste at source requires a level of innovation and new technology that the chemical industry is beginning to adopt. The green chemistry revolution provides an enormous number of opportunities to discover and apply new synthetic approaches using alternative feedstocks; ecofriendly reaction conditions, energy minimizations and the design of less toxic and inherently safer chemicals. In this review exciting opportunities and some successful examples (...)
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  30. R. Bruce King (2000). The Role of Mathematics in the Experimental/Theoretical/Computational Trichotomy of Chemistry. Foundations of Chemistry 2 (3):221-236.
    The drastically increasing availability ofmodern computers coupled with the equally drasticallylower cost of a given amount of computer power inrecent years has resulted in the evolution of thetraditional experimental/theoretical dichotomy inchemistry into anexperimental/theoretical/computational trichotomy. This trichotomy can be schematically represented by atriangle (the ETC triangle) with experimental,theoretical, and computational chemistry at the threevertices. The ET and EC edges of the ETC triangledepict the uses of theoretical and computationalchemistry, respectively, to predict and interpretexperimental results. The TC edge depicts therelationship between theoretical (...)
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  31. U. Klein (2002). Van Brakel, J., Philosophy of Chemistry, Leuven University Press, Leuven. Erkenntnis 56 (2):252-256.
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  32. A. Korobov (2005). Simple Chemical Reactions in the Solid State: Towards Elaborating a Conception. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 7 (3):307-314.
    In contrast to the conventional homogeneous kinetics, there is no conception of a simple reaction in the solid-state reaction kinetics. The geometric-probabilistic phenomenology currently in use is not adequate for describing the interplay between the chemical mechanism and the observed kinetic behaviour. An attempt is made to formulate a conception of simple reaction in the solid state as a basis for constructing kinetic models of involved reactions.
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  33. Jeffrey Kovac (2000). Professionalism and Ethics in Chemistry. Foundations of Chemistry 2 (3):207-219.
    This essay offers a preliminary philosophy ofchemistry as a profession focusing on professionalethics. First, I look at how well chemistry fits themodel of a liberal profession. I then explore therelationship between epistemology and ethics. Therelationship between chemistry and society isdiscussed in the context of the two-dimensionalclassification of research developed by Donald Stokesin his book Pasteur's Quadrant. Finally, Iraise the questions of an appropriate moral ideal forchemistry and the ethical conflicts that can occurwhen chemists simultaneously fulfill more than one role.
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  34. Martín Labarca & Olimpia Lombardi (2009). Klaus Ruthenberg and Jaap Van Brakel (Eds): Stuff. The Nature of Chemical Substances. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 11 (3):183-186.
    Klaus Ruthenberg and Jaap van Brakel (eds): Stuff. The nature of chemical substances Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 183-186 DOI 10.1007/s10698-009-9077-6 Authors Martín Labarca, CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes Buenos Aires Argentina Olimpia Lombardi, CONICET, Universidad de Buenos Aires Buenos Aires Argentina Journal Foundations of Chemistry Online ISSN 1572-8463 Print ISSN 1386-4238 Journal Volume Volume 11 Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 3.
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  35. M. J. Laing (2010). The Question Mark at Uranium. Foundations of Chemistry 12 (1):27-30.
    Being excerpts from pages 187, 203, 204, 207, 208, 209, 210 and 211 of Uncle Tungsten , extracted by Michael Laing with the consent of the author, Professor Oliver Sacks, and Picador Publishers.
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  36. Michael Laing (2011). Sam Kean: The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World From the Periodic Table of the Elements. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 13 (1):77-77.
    Sam Kean: The disappearing spoon: and other true tales of madness, love, and the history of the world from the periodic table of the elements Content Type Journal Article Pages 77-77 DOI 10.1007/s10698-010-9101-x Authors Michael Laing, School of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 4041 South Africa Journal Foundations of Chemistry Online ISSN 1572-8463 Print ISSN 1386-4238 Journal Volume Volume 13 Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 1.
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  37. Pierre Laszlo (2004). Book Review: Mapping the Spectrum. Techniques of Visual Representation in Research and Teaching. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 6 (2):177-189.
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  38. Pierre Laszlo (1999). Circulation of Concepts. Foundations of Chemistry 1 (3):225-238.
    A major obstacle to chemistry being a deductive science is that its core concepts very often are defined in a circular manner: it is impossible to explain what an acid is without reference to the complementary concept of a base. There are many such dual pairs among the core concepts of chemistry. Such circulation of concepts, rather than an infirmity chemistry is beset with, is seen as a source of vitality and dynamism.
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  39. Robin Le Poidevin (2005). Missing Elements and Missing Premises: A Combinatorial Argument for the Ontological Reduction of Chemistry. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 56 (1):117-134.
    Does chemistry reduce to physics? If this means ‘Can we derive the laws of chemistry from the laws of physics?’, recent discussions suggest that the answer is ‘no’. But sup posing that kind of reduction—‘epistemological reduction’—to be impossible, the thesis of ontological reduction may still be true: that chemical properties are determined by more fundamental properties. However, even this thesis is threatened by some objections to the physicalist programme in the philosophy of mind, objections that generalize to the chemical case. (...)
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  40. J. A. Linthorst (2010). An Overview: Origins and Development of Green Chemistry. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 12 (1):55-68.
    This article provides an overview of the origins and development of green chemistry. Aiming to contribute to the understanding of green chemistry, basically from a historical point of view, this overview argues that contextual influences and the user friendliness of the term are drivers for the explosive growth of green chemistry. It is observed that political support for its development has been significant, in which the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 was a formal political starting-point, but informally the origins of (...)
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  41. Lee McIntyre (1999). The Emergence of the Philosophy of Chemistry. Foundations of Chemistry 1 (1):57-63.
    After a long period of neglect, the philosophy of chemistry is slowly being recognized as a newly emerging branch of the philosophy of science. This paper endorses and defends this emergence given the difficulty of reducing all of the philosophical problems raised by chemistry to those already being considered within the philosophy of physics, and recognition that many of the phenomena in chemistry are epistemologically emergent.
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  42. Lee Mclntyre (2007). The Philosophy of Chemistry: Ten Years Later. Synthese 155 (3):291 - 292.
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  43. Jack Morrel (2000). D.M. Knight and H. Kragh (Eds.): The Making of the Chemist: The Social History of Chemistry in Europe, 1789–1914. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 2 (2):181-185.
  44. Paul Needham (2003). Maureen Christie: The Ozone Layer. A Philosophy of Science Perspective. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 5 (3):253-261.
  45. Paul Needham (2000). Atomic Notation and Atomistic Hypotheses Translated by Paul Needham. Foundations of Chemistry 2 (2):127-180.
  46. Mary Jo Nye (2002). Nalini Bhushan and Stuart Rosenfeld, Eds: Of Minds and Molecules: New Philosophical Perspectives on Chemistry. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 4 (1):73-77.
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  47. Richard M. Pagni (2009). The Weak Nuclear Force, the Chirality of Atoms, and the Origin of Optically Active Molecules. Foundations of Chemistry 11 (2):105-122.
    Although chemical phenomena are primarily associated with electrons in atoms, ions, and molecules, the masses, charges, spins, and other properties of the nuclei in these species contribute significantly as well. Isotopes, for instance, have proven invaluable in chemistry, in particular the elucidation of reaction mechanisms. Elements with unstable nuclei, for example carbon-14 undergoing beta decay, have enriched chemistry and many other scientific disciplines. The nuclei of all elements have a much more subtle and largely unknown effect on chemical phenomena. All (...)
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  48. Ernesto Paparazzo (2008). Why Take Chemistry Stoically? The Case of Posidonius. Foundations of Chemistry 10 (1):63-75.
    This paper analyzes views of the Stoic philosopher Posidonius (1st century BC) in the light of modern Chemistry. I propose that Posidonius’ account on “generation and destruction” bears noteworthy similarities to the scientific notions of chemical elements, chemical species, nuclear reactions, and the law of conservation of mass. I find that his views compare favorably also with our understanding of chemical change at solid surfaces. Provided his thought is correctly placed in the cultural context of his day, I argue that (...)
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  49. Harry E. Pence (2002). A. Lundgren and B. Bensaude-Vincent, Eds: Communicating Chemistry: Textbooks and Their Audiences, 1789–1929. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 4 (1):79-81.
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  50. Nikolaos Psarros & Kōstas Gavroglou (eds.) (1999). Ars Mutandi: Issues in Philosophy and History of Chemistry. Leipziger Universitätsverlag.
1 — 50 / 132