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  1. Steinar Bøyum (2004). Philosophical Experience in Childhood. Thinking (3).
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  2. Janet Felshin (1967). Perspectives and Principles for Physical Education. New York, Wiley.
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  3. Andrew Franklin-Hall (2013). On Becoming an Adult: Autonomy and the Moral Relevance of Life's Stages. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (251):223-247.
    What is it about a person's becoming an adult that makes it generally inappropriate to treat that person paternalistically any longer? The Standard View holds that a mere difference in age or stage of life cannot in itself be morally relevant, but only matters insofar as it is correlated with the development of capacities for mature practical reasoning. This paper defends the contrary view: two people can have all the same general psychological attributes and yet the mere fact that one (...)
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  4. Sue Ellen Henry (2013). Bodies at Home and at School: Toward a Theory of Embodied Social Class Status. Educational Theory 63 (1):1-16.
    Sociology has long recognized the centrality of the body in the reciprocal construction of individuals and society, and recent research has explored the influence of a variety of social institutions on the body. Significant research has established the influence of social class, child-rearing practices, and variable language forms in families and children. Less well understood is the influence of children's social class status on their gestures, comportment, and other bodily techniques. In this essay Sue Ellen Henry brings these two areas (...)
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  5. Gail D. Heyman, Lalida Sritanyaratana & Kimberly E. Vanderbilt (2013). Young Children's Trust in Overtly Misleading Advice. Cognitive Science 37 (4):646-667.
    The ability of 3- and 4-year-old children to disregard advice from an overtly misleading informant was investigated across five studies (total n = 212). Previous studies have documented limitations in young children's ability to reject misleading advice. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that these limitations are primarily due to an inability to reject specific directions that are provided by others, rather than an inability to respond in a way that is opposite to what has been indicated by (...)
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  6. Viktor Johansson (2011). 'In Charge of the Truffula Seeds': On Children's Literature, Rationality and Children's Voices in Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):359-377.
    In this paper I investigate how philosophy can speak for children and how children can have a voice in philosophy and speak for philosophy. I argue that we should understand children as responsible rational individuals who are involved in their own philosophical inquiries and who can be involved in our own philosophical investigations—not because of their rational abilities, but because we acknowledge them as conversational partners, acknowledge their reasons as reasons, and speak for them as well as let them speak (...)
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  7. Donncha Kavanagh, Kieran Keohane & Carmen Kuhling (eds.) (2011). Organization in Play. Peter Lang.
    Introduction : playing with play -- Child's play : childhood and "the lack" in organizational discourse -- Playful representations of work -- Dance as play and work : images of organization in Irish dance -- Talk and silence : playing with silence as an organizational resource -- Playing the fool : the university as fool -- Play and madness in the market -- Playing business : gambling and "casino capitalism".
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  8. Ekkehard Martens (2009). (Germany) Pleasure in Philosophizing—Not Just for Children. In Eva Marsal, Takara Dobashi & Barbara Weber (eds.), Children Philosophize Worldwide: Theoretical and Practical Concepts. Peter Lang. 9--219.
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  9. Gareth Matthews, The Philosophy of Childhood. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  10. W. S. F. Pickering (1995). Durkheim and Moral Education for Children: A Recently Discovered Lecture. Journal of Moral Education 24 (1):19-36.
    Abstract Emile Durkheim (1858?1917) is rightly called the father of the sociology of education. Although he saw his major task to be the establishment of sociology as an academic discipline which would be taught in French universities, he was obliged to spend much of his time lecturing on education. This was required by the wording of his university appointments; first in Bordeaux, then in Paris. His interests in education covered large areas, including the purpose of education, the social qualities of (...)
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  11. Tamar Schapiro (1999). What is a Child? Ethics 109 (4):715–738.
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  12. Sally J. Scholz (2010). That All Children Should Be Free: Beauvoir, Rousseau, and Childhood. Hypatia 25 (2):394 - 411.
    Simone de Beauvoir offers one of the most interesting philosophical accounts of childhood, and, as numerous scholars have argued, it is one of the most important contributions that she made to existentialism. Beauvoir stressed the importance of childhood on one's ability to assume one's freedom. This radically changed how freedom was construed for existentialism. Rather than positing an adult subjectivity that tries to flee freedom through bad faith, Beauvoir's account forces a recognition of a situated freedom that itself is also (...)
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