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  1. Robert P. Abelson (1983). Commentary Points. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (4):591.
  2. Robert P. Abelson (1981). Going After PARRY. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (4):534.
  3. Robert P. Abelson (1979). Imagining the Purpose of Imagery. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):548-549.
  4. Jock Abra (1998). Should Psychology Be a Science? Pros and Cons. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  5. Tara Abraham (2008). Mind as Machine: A History of Cognitive Science. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 41 (4):623-624.
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  6. John G. Adair (1978). The Combined Probabilities of 345 Studies: Only Half the Story? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):386.
  7. A. David Redish Adam Johnson, André A. Fenton, Cliff Kentros (2009). Looking for Cognition in the Structure Within the Noise. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (2):55.
  8. David B. Adams (1980). Motivational Systems: Fear or Defense? Pain or Recuperation? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):301.
  9. Jack A. Adams, Philip H. Marshall & Norman W. Bray (1971). Closed-Loop Theory and Long-Term Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 90 (2):242-250.
  10. Marcus P. Adams (2011). Modularity, Theory of Mind, and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Philosophy of Science 78 (5):763-773.
    The theory of mind (ToM) deficit associated with autism spectrum disorder has been a central topic in the debate about the modularity of the mind. In a series of papers, Philip Gerrans and Valerie Stone argue that positing a ToM module does not best explain the deficits exhibited by individuals with autism (Gerrans 2002; Stone & Gerrans 2006a, 2006b; Gerrans & Stone 2008). In this paper, I first criticize Gerrans and Stone’s (2008) account. Second, I discuss various studies of individuals (...)
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  11. Wendy J. Adams (2008). Frames of Reference for the Light-From-Above Prior in Visual Search and Shape Judgements. Cognition 107 (1):137-150.
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  12. J. S. Adelman & Z. Estes (2013). Emotion and Memory: A Recognition Advantage for Positive and Negative Words Independent of Arousal. Cognition 129 (3):530-535.
  13. Joseph Agassi (2003). Newell's List. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):601-602.
    Newell wanted a theory of cognition to abide by some explicit criteria, here called the Newell Test. The test differs from the Turing Test because it is explicit. The Newell Test will include the Turing Test if its characterization of cognition is complete. It is not. Its use here is open-ended: A system that does not pass it well invites improvement.
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  14. George Ainslie (1985). Behavior is What Can Be Reinforced. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):53-54.
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  15. Ken Aizawa, Anna Alexandrova, Sophie Allen, Michael Anderson, Holly Anderson, Kristin Andrews, Adam Arico, Andre Ariew, Edward Averill & Andrew R. Bailey (2008). We Would Like to Thank the Following for Contributing to the Journal as Reviewers This Past Year: Rebecca Abraham Fred Adams. Philosophical Psychology 21 (6):859-860.
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  16. Kenneth Aizawa (2014). The Enactivist Revolution. Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies (2):19-42.
    Among the many ideas that go by the name of “enactivism” there is the idea that by “cognition” we should understand what is more commonly taken to be behavior. For clarity, label such forms of enactivism “enactivismb.” This terminology requires some care in evaluating enactivistb claims. There is a genuine risk of enactivist and non-enactivist cognitive scientists talking past one another. So, for example, when enactivistsb write that “cognition does not require representations” they are not necessarily denying what cognitivists claim (...)
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  17. Kenneth Aizawa (2013). Introduction to “The Material Bases of Cognition”. Minds and Machines 23 (3):277-286.
  18. Kenneth Aizawa (2002). Cognitive Architecture. In Stephen P. Stich & Ted A. Warfield (eds.), Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell
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  19. Kenneth Aizawa (1993). Reflections on Philosophy. New York: St Martin's Press.
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  20. Kenneth Aizawa (1993). Cognitive Science. In Reflections on Philosophy. New York: St Martin's Press
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  21. Kenneth Aizawa, Liliana Albertazzi, Keith Allen, Sarah Allred, Marc Alspector-Kelly, Kristin Andrews, André Ariew, Valtteri Arstila, Anthony Atkinson & Edward Averill (2009). We Would Like to Thank the Following for Contributing to the Journal as Reviewers This Past Year: Fred Adams Jonathan Adler. Philosophical Psychology 22 (6):817-818.
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  22. Kathleen Akins, Pignocchi Alessandro, Joshua Alexander, Anna Alexandrova, Keith Allen, Sophie Allen, Colin Allen, Maria Alvarez, Santiago Amaya & Ben Ambridge (2010). Philosophical Psychology Would Like to Thank Our Reviewers for Their Generous Contributions to the Journal in 2010. Jonathan Adler Kenneth Aizawa. Philosophical Psychology 23 (6):845-848.
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  23. L. Albertazzi (ed.) (2001). The Origin of Cognitive Science. Kluwer.
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  24. Frederick Luis Aldama (2012). Strange Concepts and the Stories They Make Possible: Cognition, Culture, Narrative (Review). Substance 41 (3):180-182.
    In Strange Concepts and The Stories they Make Possible: Cognition, Culture, Narrative, Lisa Zunshine widens her scope from an erstwhile singular focus on Theory of Mind (inferring interior states from exterior expression and gesture) in fiction, turning her sights toward a branch of psychology aimed at the study of the early cognitive development of humans. Here she explores our distinctive mental capacity to ascribe a function to objects (a chair is to sit, etc.) and an essence to living creatures (the (...)
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  25. Joshua Alexander, Mark Alicke, Holly Andersen, Michael Anderson, Kristin Andrews, István Aranyosi, Adam Arico, Nomy Arpaly, Robert Audi & Andrew R. Bailey (2012). Philosophical Psychology Would Like to Thank the Following for Contributing to the Journal as Reviewers This Past Year: Fred Adams Kenneth Aizawa. Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):161-163.
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  26. Joshua Alexander, Ronald Mallon & Jonathan Weinberg (2010). Competence: What's In? What's Out? Who Knows? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):329-330.
    Knobe's argument rests on a way of distinguishing performance errors from the competencies that delimit our cognitive architecture. We argue that other sorts of evidence than those that he appeals to are needed to illuminate the boundaries of our folk capacities in ways that would support his conclusions.
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  27. Richard D. Alexander (1976). Evolution, Human Behavior, and Determinism. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1976:3 - 21.
  28. Daniel Algom (2009). Slippery Platform: The Role of Automatic and Intentional Processes in Testing the Effect of Notation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):328-329.
    The type of processing of numerical dimensions varies greatly and is governed by context. Considering this flexibility in tandem with a fuzzy demarcation line between automatic and intentional processes, it is suggested that testing the effect of notation should not be confined to automatic processing, in particular to passive viewing. Recent behavioral data satisfying the authors' stipulations reveal a considerable, though perhaps not exclusive, core of common abstract processing.
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  29. Daniel Algom (1996). Correspondence Conception of Memory: A Good Match is Hard to Find. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):188.
  30. Mark Alicke (2012). You Say You Want a Revolution? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (6):426-427.
    I argue that Dixon et al. fail to maintain a careful distinction between the negative evaluation definition of and the implications of this definition for correcting the social ills that prejudice engenders. I also argue that they adduce little evidence to suggest that if prejudice were diminished, commensurate reductions in discrimination would not follow.
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  31. Mark Alicke, Ellen Gordon & David Rose (2012). Hypocrisy: What Counts? Philosophical Psychology (5):1-29.
    Hypocrisy is a multi-faceted concept that has been studied empirically by psychologists and discussed logically by philosophers. In this study, we pose various behavioral scenarios to research participants and ask them to indicate whether the actor in the scenario behaved hypocritically. We assess many of the components that have been considered to be necessary for hypocrisy (e.g., the intent to deceive, self-deception), factors that may or may not be distinguished from hypocrisy (e.g., weakness of will), and factors that may moderate (...)
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  32. S. Haun G. Allagher (2007). First Page Preview. Philosophical Psychology 20 (1).
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  33. Rudolf Allers (1940). Cognitive Psychology. New Scholasticism 14 (1):76-78.
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  34. D. A. Allport (1983). Language and Cognition. In Roy Harris (ed.), Approaches to Language. Pergamon 61--94.
  35. Murray Alpert (1986). Language Process and Hallucination Phenomenology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):518.
  36. Holly Andersen (2015). Mental Causation. In N. Levy J. Clausen (ed.), Springer Handbook of Neuroethics. Springer
    The problem of mental causation in contemporary philosophy of mind concerns the possibility of holding two different views that are in apparent tension. The first is physicalism, the view that there is nothing more to the world than the physical. The second is that the mental has genuine causal efficacy in a way that does not reduce to pure physical particle-bumping. This article provides a historical background to this question, with focus on Davidson’s anomalous monism and Kim’s causal exclusion problem. (...)
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  37. James A. Anderson (2003). Arithmetic on a Parallel Computer: Perception Versus Logic. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 4 (2):169-188.
    This article discusses the properties of a controllable, flexible, hybrid parallel computing architecture that potentially merges pattern recognition and arithmetic. Humans perform integer arithmetic in a fundamentally different way than logic-based computers. Even though the human approach to arithmetic is both slow and inaccurate it can have substantial advantages when useful approximations ( intuition ) are more valuable than high precision. Such a computational strategy may be particularly useful when computers based on nanocomponents become feasible because it offers a way (...)
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  38. Michael L. Anderson (2006). Cognitive Science and Epistemic Openness. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (2):125-154.
    b>. Recent findings in cognitive science suggest that the epistemic subject is more complex and epistemically porous than is generally pictured. Human knowers are open to the world via multiple channels, each operating for particular purposes and according to its own logic. These findings need to be understood and addressed by the philosophical community. The current essay argues that one consequence of the new findings is to invalidate certain arguments for epistemic anti-realism.
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  39. D. Andler (1992). Épistémologie Et Cognition Colloque de Cerisy.
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  40. Daniel Andler, Studying Cognition Today. Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy 5.
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  41. Daniel Andler (2009). The Philosophy of Cognitive Science. In A. Brenner & J. Gayon (eds.), French Studies in the Philosophy of Science: Contemporary Research in France. Springer
    The rise of cognitive science in the last half-century has been accompanied by a considerable amount of philosophical activity. No other area within analytic philosophy in the second half of that period has attracted more attention or produced more publications. Philosophical work relevant to cognitive science has become a sprawling field (extending beyond analytic philosophy) which no one can fully master, although some try and keep abreast of the philosophical literature and of the essential scientific developments. Due to the particular (...)
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  42. Daniel Andler (2006). Cognitive Science. In L. Kritzman (ed.), The Columbia History of Twentieth Century French Thought.
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  43. Stephen Pearl Andres (1871). The Primary Synopsis of Universology and Alwato the New Scientific Universal Language. Dion Thomas.
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  44. Michael V. Antony (1992). The Where and When of What? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):201-202.
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  45. Mihailo Antovic (2003). The Position Of Semantics Within Contemporary Cognitive Science. Facta Universitatis 10 (2):415-424.
    This paper provides an analysis of the importance of some present-day semantic theories for contemporary cognitive science. The question of the scope of cognitive science is discussed, followed by a short overview of the study of linguistics in this multidisciplinary enterprise. Finally, three modern approaches to semantics within this framework are discussed and their advantages and disadvantages are briefly summarized. Conceptual semantics is singled out as a rather plausible approach to the study of meaning, even though it is often deemed (...)
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  46. John S. Antrobus (1993). Commentary on Horne. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (1):83-85.
  47. John Antrobus, Toshiaki Kondo, Ruth Reinsel & George Fein (1995). Dreaming in the Late Morning: Summation of REM and Diurnal Cortical Activation. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (3):275-299.
    Since the discovery that the characteristics of dreaming sleep are far stronger in Stage 1 rapid eye movement sleep than in any other biological state, investigators have attempted to determine the relative responsibility of the tonic versus the phasic properties of REM sleep for the different characteristics of dreaming–features such as the amount of information in the dream report, the brightness and clarity of the visual images, shifts in thematic continuity, and incongruities of image and meaning. The present experiment is (...)
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  48. Eric Arnau, Saray Ayala & Thomas Sturm (2014). Cognitive Externalism Meets Bounded Rationality. Philosophical Psychology 27 (1):50-64.
    When proponents of cognitive externalism (CE) turn to empirical studies in cognitive science to put the framework to use and to assess its explanatory success, they typically refer to perception, memory, or motor coordination. In contrast, not much has been said about reasoning. One promising avenue to explore in this respect is the theory of bounded rationality (BR). To clarify the relationship between CE and BR, we criticize Andy Clark's understanding of BR, as well as his claim that BR does (...)
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  49. Eric Arnau & Andreu Ballús (2013). Innovative Scaffolding: Understanding Innovation as the Disclosure of Hidden Affordances. Revista Iberoamericana de Argumentación 7:1-11.
    Much attention has been drawn to the cognitive basis of innovation. While interesting in many ways, this poses the threat of falling back to traditional internalist assumptions with regard to cognition. We oppose the ensuing contrast between internal cognitive processing and external public practices and technologies that such internal cognitive systems might produce and utilize. We argue that innovation is best understood from the gibsonian notion of affordance, and that many innovative practices emerge from the external scaffolding of cognitive processes. (...)
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  50. Harald Atmanspacher (2003). Editorial. Mind and Matter 1 (1):3-7.
    Mind and Matter is conceived as an interdisciplinary journal, aimed at an educated readership interested in all aspects of mind-matter research from the perspectives of the sciences and humanities. It is devoted to the publication of empirical, theoretical, and conceptual research and the discussion of its results. The main subject areas of the journal are -- neuroscience, cognitive science, behavioral science -- physical approaches, mathematical modeling, data analysis -- philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, applied metaphysics --cultural and social studies, (...)
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