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Summary

The philosophy of cognitive science concerns philosophical issues that arise in cognitive science. Indeed, cognitive science is itself partly a philosophical project: it combines tools and insights from psychology, neuroscience, artificial intelligence, biology, anthropology, and philosophy. Initially unified by a commitment to a computational and representational outlook on cognition, cognitive science has increasingly come to embrace a wide variety of theoretical and methodological outlooks. Major questions that are being considered in the philosophy of cognitive science include: (i) Which (if any) cognitive processes or states are innate (in which organisms)? (ii) Should cognitive processes be seen as computational processes—and, if so, over what do they compute? (iii) What are the relationships between cognitive processes and neural (and other physiological) processes?

Key works Fodor 1983 is a classic—and still very influential—defense of the view that the mind consists of a handful of specialized and informationally encapsulated input and output systems, plus a central reasoning system. A more recent defense of a different, more empiricist view of cognition is in Prinz 2002 .
Introductions Two good introductions are: Clark 2001 Thagard 2007
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  1. Robert P. Abelson (1983). Commentary Points. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (4):591.
  2. Robert P. Abelson (1981). Going After PARRY. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (4):534.
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  3. Robert P. Abelson (1979). Imagining the Purpose of Imagery. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):548-549.
  4. Ana Margarida Abrantes (2009). Cognition and Culture. Semiotics:480-486.
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  5. Peter Achinstein (1989). Explanation and Acceptability. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):467.
  6. John G. Adair (1978). The Combined Probabilities of 345 Studies: Only Half the Story? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):386.
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  7. Robert K. Adair (1982). A Physics Editor Comments on Peters and Ceci's Peer-Review Study. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (2):196.
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  8. S. V. Adamovich & A. G. Feldman (1989). The Prerequisites for One-Jint Motor Control Theories. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (2):210.
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  9. David Adams (1982). Defense Motivational System: Issues of Emotion, Reinforcement, and Neural Structure. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):675.
  10. David B. Adams (1980). Motivational Systems: Fear or Defense? Pain or Recuperation? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):301.
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  11. Ebrahim Oshni Alvandi & Majeed Akbari Dehagi (2010). Cognitive Approach to Model-Based Sciences. International Journal on Humanistic Ideology 1:153-165.
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  12. Daniel Andler (unknown). Studying Cognition Today. Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy 5.
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  13. K. Apel, Julie A. Wolter & J. J. Masterson (2011). Mental Graphemic Representations (MGRs). In Norbert M. Seel (ed.), Encyclopedia of the Sciences of Learning. Springer Verlag
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  14. Anthony P. Atkinson (1998). Systems, Subsystems and Persons: The Explanatory Scope of Cognitive Psychology. Acta Analytica 20 (20):43-60.
  15. Harald Atmanspacher (2006). Editorial. Mind and Matter 4 (1):3-5.
    Mind and Matter is conceived as an interdisciplinary journal, aimed at an educated readership interested in all aspects of mind-matter research from the perspectives of the sciences and humanities. It is devoted to the publication of empirical, theoretical, and conceptual research and the discussion of its results. The main subject areas of the journal are -- neuroscience, cognitive science, behavioral science -- physical approaches, mathematical modeling, data analysis -- philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, applied metaphysics --cultural and social studies, (...)
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  16. Giuseppe Attanasi, Astrid Hopfensitz, Emiliano Lorini & Frédéric Moisan (2014). The Effects of Social Ties on Coordination: Conceptual Foundations for an Empirical Analysis. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (1):47-73.
    This paper investigates the influence that social ties can have on behavior. After defining the concept of social ties that we consider, we introduce an original model of social ties. The impact of such ties on social preferences is studied in a coordination game with outside option. We provide a detailed game theoretical analysis of this game while considering various types of players, i.e., self-interest maximizing, inequity averse, and fair agents. In addition to these approaches that require strategic reasoning in (...)
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  17. Elizabeth Baeten (2014). Steps Toward a Zoology of Mind. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 28 (2):107-129.
    Much of twentieth- and twenty-first-century theorizing about cognitive processes, whether in philosophy of mind, cognitive science, cognitive psychology, or related disciplines, spins accounts of cognition totally devoid of any consideration of cognition as an attribute of animals making a living (or not) in various habitats. A significant shift in discussions of mind and cognition follows if we take seriously the fact that humans are animals, products of evolutionary processes and situated squarely within suites of ecosystems. Ignoring evolutionary history is an (...)
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  18. Xabier Barandiaran & Alvaro Moreno (2006). On What Makes Certain Dynamical Systems Cognitive: A Minimally Cognitive Organization Program. Adaptive Behavior 14:171-185..
    Dynamicism has provided cognitive science with important tools to understand some aspects of “how cognitive agents work” but the issue of “what makes something cognitive” has not been sufficiently addressed yet, and, we argue, the former will never be complete without the later. Behavioristic characterizations of cognitive properties are criticized in favor of an organizational approach focused on the internal dynamic relationships that constitute cognitive systems. A definition of cognition as adaptive-autonomy in the embodied and situated neurodynamic domain is provided: (...)
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  19. Lluís Barceló-Coblijn & Antoni Gomila (2012). Evidence of Recursion in Tool Use. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):219-220.
    We discuss the discovery of technologies involving knotted netting, such as textiles, basketry, and cordage, in the Upper Paleolithic. This evidence, in our view, suggests a new way of connecting toolmaking and syntactic structure in human evolution, because these technologies already exhibit an which we take to constitute the key transition to human cognition.
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  20. Winona C. Barker & Margaret O. Dayhoff (1980). Evolutionary and Functional Relationships of Homologous Physiological Mechanisms. BioScience 30 (9):593-600.
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  21. Robin Barrow (2004). Language and Character. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 3 (3):267-279.
    Recent empirical research into the brain, while reinforcing the view that we are extensively ‘programmed’, does not refute the idea of a distinctive human mind. The human mind is primarily a product of the human capacity for a distinctive kind of language. Human language is thus what gives us our consciousness, reasoning capacity and autonomy. To study and understand the human, however, is ultimately a task beyond empirical disciplines such as psychology. Literature is the repository of wisdom relating to humanity (...)
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  22. Lawrence Barsalou (1992). Cognitive Psychology: An Overview for Cognitive Scientisits. Erlbaum.
    Second, I have written this book for proseminars, courses, and course sequences on cognitive science that cover methods and contributions from cognitive psychology. Similarly, this book can be used in courses and seminars that focus on ...
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  23. Samuel Bashour (2000). Evolution of the God-Mind in the Homo Sapiens.
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  24. Letizia Gianformaggio Bastida & Stanley L. Paulson (1995). Cognition and Interpretation of Law. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  25. Thierry Baudouin & Michèle Collin (2005). Architectures et démocratie productive. Multitudes 1 (1):89-95.
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  26. Brian Beakley (1992). The Structure of Explanation in Cognitive Science. Dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook
    The goal of this dissertation is to show that cognitive science, while dealing with the special subject of the mind, can nonetheless fit into the same general model that Bas van Fraassen provides for the natural sciences. The dissertation focuses specifically on the nature of explanation in the cognitive sciences. ;Chapter One makes clear what I take cognitive science to be in the work. The two central cases here are Noam Chomsky's theory of generative syntax, and David Marr's computational theory (...)
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  27. William Bechtel (2012). Understanding Endogenously Active Mechanisms: A Scientific and Philosophical Challenge. [REVIEW] European Journal for Philosophy of Science 2 (2):233-248.
    Abstract Although noting the importance of organization in mechanisms, the new mechanistic philosophers of science have followed most biologists in focusing primarily on only the simplest mode of organization in which operations are envisaged as occurring sequentially. Increasingly, though, biologists are recognizing that the mechanisms they confront are non-sequential and the operations nonlinear. To understand how such mechanisms function through time, they are turning to computational models and tools of dynamical systems theory. Recent research on circadian rhythms addressing both intracellular (...)
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  28. William Bechtel (2009). Explanation: Mechanism, Modularity, and Situated Cognition. In Murat Aydede & P. Robbins (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge 155--170.
  29. William Bechtel (2001). Representations: From Neural Systems to Cognitive Systems. In William P. Bechtel, Pete Mandik, Jennifer Mundale & Robert S. Stufflebeam (eds.), Philosophy and the Neurosciences: A Reader. Blackwell
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  30. William P. Bechtel (1998). Representations and Cognitive Explanations: Assessing the Dynamicist Challenge in Cognitive Science. Cognitive Science 22 (3):295-317.
    Advocates of dynamical systems theory (DST) sometimes employ revolutionary rhetoric. In an attempt to clarify how DST models differ from others in cognitive science, I focus on two issues raised by DST: the role for representations in mental models and the conception of explanation invoked. Two features of representations are their role in standing-in for features external to the system and their format. DST advocates sometimes claim to have repudiated the need for stand-ins in DST models, but I argue that (...)
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  31. R. Beers (1997). Expressions of Mind in Animal Behavior. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press 198--209.
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  32. R. Beltrame (2007). The Theoretical Environment Around 1965. Constructivist Foundations 2 (2-3):25-28.
    Purpose: Ernst von Glasersfeld has actively contributed to the development of the ideas of the Scuola Operativa Italiana (SOI) from 1947. The paper outlines the theoretical status of the SOI research around 1965, which also marks the conclusion of an important phase of this development. The aim is to contribute to better understanding of the continuity of Glasersfeld’s research.
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  33. Anita Benisławska & Marek Kołata (2008). Does Skepticism Lead to Dogmatism? Dialogue and Universalism 18 (1/3):139-148.
    The article juxtaposes Jan Srzednicki’s conception of cognition with Jean Piaget’s psychology of cognition. Human’s (child’s) cognition is syncretic. Various cognitive data are confused, systematized, dogmatized or become chaotic, and mistakes appear. These mistakes can be overcome thanks to analytical, intuitive or logical perspectives. Cognition moves from the sphere of “children’s dogmatism” to the world of “mature skepticism”. The syncretic cognition can be overcome thanks to various cognitive procedures, e.g., analytical, logical or intuitive. The intuitive cognition is primary and synthetic—it (...)
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  34. F. M. Bennett (1925). The Personal God. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 6 (2):114.
  35. J. L. Bermúdez & M. E. Elton (2000). Personal and Subpersonal: Essays on Psychological Explanation. Philosophical Explorations 3 (1):1-119.
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  36. Tamás Biró (2010). Will Optimality Theory Colonize All of Higher Cognition? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (5):383 - 384.
    To establish Optimality Theory as a framework in anthropology, or as a general model of higher human cognition, researchers have to demonstrate OT is convincing in a number of ways. This commentary summarizes some of them including factorial typologies, exact formulation of candidate sets and constraints, and computational plausibility.
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  37. Norbert Bischof, Comparative Ethology of Incest Avoidance.
  38. M. Bitbol & C. Petitmengin (2013). A Defense of Introspection From Within. Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):269-279.
    Context: We are presently witnessing a revival of introspective methods, which implicitly challenges an impressive list of in-principle objections that were addressed to introspection by various philosophers and by behaviorists. Problem: How can one overcome those objections and provide introspection with a secure basis? Results: A renewed definition of introspection as “enlargement of the field of attention and contact with re-enacted experience,” rather than “looking-within,” is formulated. This entails (i) an alternative status of introspective phenomena, which are no longer taken (...)
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  39. Sara Bizarro (2008). Mental Mechanisms, by William Bechtel. Disputatio.
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  40. B. H. Bode (1914). Psychology as a Science. Philosophical Review 23:479.
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  41. Remo Bodei (1993). El largo adiós a la identidad personal. Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política 2:5-20.
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  42. Margaret Boden (2001). 2 Life and Cognition. In João Branquinho (ed.), The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press 11.
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  43. Radu J. Bogdan (1994). Grounds for Cognition. Erlbaum.
    This is how guidance of behavior to goal grounds and explains cognition and the main forms in which it manages information.
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  44. Pascal Boyer (2009). In Cognition and Culture. In Pascal Boyer & James Wertsch (eds.), Memory in Mind and Culture. Cambridge 3.
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  45. Kerry E. Jordan & Brannon & M. Elizabeth (2009). A Comparative Approach to Understanding Human Numerical Cognition. In Bruce M. Hood & Laurie R. Santos (eds.), The Origins of Object Knowledge. OUP Oxford
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  46. Sabine Brauckmann (2004). The Virtue of Being Too Early: Paul A. Weiss and 'Axonal Transport'. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 26 (3/4):333 - 353.
    The essay introduces how Paul A. Weiss (1898-1989) analyzed his data on neuronal outgrowth and axonal transport, supported by constriction experiments of thousands of living mature nerve fibers. At the University of Chicago his group measured the steady proximo-distal flow of nerve fibers. To visualize the data he used tissue culturing, light microscopy, radioactive tracers, time-lapse motion pictures and electronmicroscopy. The work resulted in the discovery of fasciculation of outgrowing nerves and a computation of the rate of axonal transport, published (...)
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  47. Manuel Bremer (2008). Conceptual Atomism and Justificationist Semantics. Lang.
    Conceptual atomism of this type is incompatible with many other semantic approaches. One of these approaches is justificationist semantics. This book assumes conceptual atomism.
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  48. Robert Edward Brennan (1940). Thomas Verner Moore, O.S.B. Cognitive Psychology. [REVIEW] The Thomist 2:156.
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  49. Maria Brincker (2010). Sensorimotor Grounding and Reused Cognitive Domains. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):270--271.
    Anderson suggests that theories of sensorimotor grounding are too narrow to account for his findings of widespread supporting multiple different cognitive I call some of the methodological assumptions underlying this conclusion into question, and suggest that his examples reaffirm rather than undermine the special status of sensorimotor processes in cognitive evolution.
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  50. Gérald Bronner (2004). Contribution à une théorie de l'abandon des croyances : la fin du Père Noël. Cahiers Internationaux de Sociologie 1 (1):117-140.
    Cet article propose, à la lumière d’un exemple particulier – l’abandon de la croyance en l’existence du Père Noël –, de tester différents scénarios théoriques de la rupture cognitive. L’exemple choisi, en raison de ses spécificités, ne peut prétendre invalider un modèle ou en confirmer définitivement un autre, mais il souhaite être une contribution au débat sur la base d’un matériau empirique rarement réuni en cette matière. Les 142 entretiens mobilisés permettent d’appréhender dans le détail divers aspects de l’abandon de (...)
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