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  1. Jon Barwise (1999). Critical Studies / Book Reviews. Philosophia Mathematica 7 (2):238-240.
  2. Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic (2011). Significance of Models of Computation, From Turing Model to Natural Computation. Minds and Machines 21 (2):301-322.
    The increased interactivity and connectivity of computational devices along with the spreading of computational tools and computational thinking across the fields, has changed our understanding of the nature of computing. In the course of this development computing models have been extended from the initial abstract symbol manipulating mechanisms of stand-alone, discrete sequential machines, to the models of natural computing in the physical world, generally concurrent asynchronous processes capable of modelling living systems, their informational structures and dynamics on both symbolic and (...)
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  3. Jeff Edmonds (2008). How to Think About Algorithms. Cambridge University Press.
    There are many algorithm texts that provide lots of well-polished code and proofs of correctness. Instead, this book presents insights, notations, and analogies to help the novice describe and think about algorithms like an expert. By looking at both the big picture and easy step-by-step methods for developing algorithms, the author helps students avoid the common pitfalls. He stresses paradigms such as loop invariants and recursion to unify a huge range of algorithms into a few meta-algorithms. Part of the goal (...)
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  4. Donald Ervin Knuth (2010). Selected Papers on Design of Algorithms. Center for the Study of Language and Information.
  5. Enrique V. Kortright (1994). Philosophy, Mathematics, Science and Computation. Topoi 13 (1):51-60.
    Attempts to lay a foundation for the sciences based on modern mathematics are questioned. In particular, it is not clear that computer science should be based on set-theoretic mathematics. Set-theoretic mathematics has difficulties with its own foundations, making it reasonable to explore alternative foundations for the sciences. The role of computation within an alternative framework may prove to be of great potential in establishing a direction for the new field of computer science.Whitehead''s theory of reality is re-examined as a foundation (...)
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  6. M. Lerman (2010). A Framework for Priority Arguments. Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a unifying framework for using priority arguments to prove theorems in computability.
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  7. Lorenzo Magnani (2004). Conjectures and Manipulations. Computational Modeling and the Extra- Theoretical Dimension of Scientific Discovery. Minds and Machines 14 (4):507-538.
    Computational philosophy (CP) aims at investigating many important concepts and problems of the philosophical and epistemological tradition in a new way by taking advantage of information-theoretic, cognitive, and artificial intelligence methodologies. I maintain that the results of computational philosophy meet the classical requirements of some Peircian pragmatic ambitions. Indeed, more than a 100 years ago, the American philosopher C.S. Peirce, when working on logical and philosophical problems, suggested the concept of pragmatism(pragmaticism, in his own words) as a logical criterion to (...)
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  8. Jordi Vallverdú I. Segura (2009). Computational Epistemology and E-Science: A New Way of Thinking. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 19 (4):557-567.
    Recent trends towards an e-Science offer us the opportunity to think about the specific epistemological changes created by computational empowerment in scientific practices. In fact, we can say that a computational epistemology exists that requires our attention. By ‘computational epistemology’ I mean the computational processes implied or required to achieve human knowledge. In that category we can include AI, supercomputers, expert systems, distributed computation, imaging technologies, virtual instruments, middleware, robotics, grids or databases. Although several authors talk about the extended mind (...)
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  9. Raymond Turner, The Philosophy of Computer Science. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  10. Stefan Wintein (2012). Assertoric Semantics and the Computational Power of Self-Referential Truth. Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (2):317-345.
    There is no consensus as to whether a Liar sentence is meaningful or not. Still, a widespread conviction with respect to Liar sentences (and other ungrounded sentences) is that, whether or not they are meaningful, they are useless . The philosophical contribution of this paper is to put this conviction into question. Using the framework of assertoric semantics , which is a semantic valuation method for languages of self-referential truth that has been developed by the author, we show that certain (...)
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Computers in Philosophy
  1. David Bourget (2010). Paperless Philosophy as a Philosophical Method. Social Epistemology 24 (4):363-375.
    I discuss the prospects for novel communication methods in academic research. I describe communication tools which could enhance the practice of conceptual analysis.
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  2. Robert Janusz (2012). Roberto Busa i humanistyczna informatyka. Rocznik Filozoficzny Ignatianum:91-106.
    Fr. Roberto Busa was an Italian Jesuit. In this article his biography will briefly be presented, and some issues raised by his philosophy analyzed. Busa was known as a pioneer of computerized research in the humanities. With the support of IBM he constructed the Index Thomisticus, containing all the works of St. Thomas Aquinas. He believed that expressions of the human can be mathematically modeled. He was the originator of a specific conception of hypertext, in which logically structured programs are (...)
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  3. Sylvia Wenmackers, Danny E. P. Vanpoucke & Igor Douven (2014). Rationality: A Social-Epistemology Perspective. Frontiers in Psychology 5 (581).
    Both in philosophy and in psychology, human rationality has traditionally been studied from an “individualistic” perspective. Recently, social epistemologists have drawn attention to the fact that epistemic interactions among agents also give rise to important questions concerning rationality. In previous work, we have used a formal model to assess the risk that a particular type of social-epistemic interactions lead agents with initially consistent belief states into inconsistent belief states. Here, we continue this work by investigating the dynamics to which these (...)
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  4. Nicole Wyatt (2001). Review of The Philosophical Computer. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):489-492.
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Databases
  1. Anthony F. Beavers (2011). Noesis and the Encyclopedic Internet Vision. Synthese 182 (2):315 - 333.
    Noesis is an Internet search engine dedicated to mapping the profession of philosophy online. In this paper, I recount the history of the project's development since 1998 and discuss the role it may play in representing philosophy optimally, adequately, fairly, and accessibly. Unlike many other representations of philosophy, Noesis is dynamic in the sense that it constantly changes and inclusive in the sense that it lets the profession speak for itself about what philosophy is, how it is practiced, and why (...)
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  2. Werner Ceusters, Barry Smith & James Matthew Fielding (2004). LinkSuite™: Software Tools for Formally Robust Ontology-Based Data and Information Integration. In Proceedings of DILS 2004 (Data Integration in the Life Sciences), (Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics, 2994). Springer.
    The integration of information resources in the life sciences is one of the most challenging problems facing bioinformatics today. We describe how Language and Computing nv, originally a developer of ontology-based natural language understanding systems for the healthcare domain, is developing a framework for the integration of structured data with unstructured information contained in natural language texts. L&C’s LinkSuite™ combines the flexibility of a modular software architecture with an ontology based on rigorous philosophical and logical principles that is designed to (...)
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  3. Jonathan Simon (2005). Formal Ontology for Natural Language Processing and the Integration of Biomedical Databases. International Journal of Medical Informatics 75:224-231.
    The central hypothesis of the collaboration between Language and Computing (L&C) and the Institute for Formal Ontology and Medical Information Science (IFOMIS) is that the methodology and conceptual rigor of a philosophically inspired formal ontology greatly benefits application ontologies. To this end r®, L&C’s ontology, which is designed to integrate and reason across various external databases simultaneously, has been submitted to the conceptual demands of IFOMIS’s Basic Formal Ontology (BFO). With this project we aim to move beyond the level of (...)
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  4. Barry Smith (2006). Against Idiosyncrasy in Ontology Development. In Formal Ontology in Information Systems (FOIS).
    The world of ontology development is full of mysteries. Recently, ISO Standard 15926 (“Lifecycle Integration of Process Plant Data Including Oil and Gas Production Facilities”), a data model initially designed to support the integration and handover of large engineering artefacts, has been proposed by its principal custodian for general use as an upper level ontology. As we shall discover, ISO 15926 is, when examined in light of this proposal, marked by a series of quite astonishing defects, which may however provide (...)
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The Internet
  1. Jacob M. Appel (2005). Organ Solicitation on the Internet: Every Man for Himself: Commentary. Hastings Center Report 35 (3):14-15.
  2. S. G. Arnal (2001). Gordon Graham The Internet://A Philosophical Inquiry. Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (3):311-311.
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  3. Joseph L. Badaracco (1997). The Internet, Intel and the Vigilante Stakeholder. Business Ethics 6 (1):18-29.
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  4. Joseph L. BadaraccoJr (1997). The Internet, Intel and the Vigilante Stakeholder. Business Ethics 6 (1):18–29.
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  5. Simon Barker (2000). The End of Argument: Knowledge and the Internet. Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (2):154-181.
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  6. Anne Beaulieu (2004). Mediating Ethnography: Objectivity and the Making of Ethnographies of the Internet. Social Epistemology 18 (2 & 3):139 – 163.
    This paper aims to contribute to current discussions about methods in anthropological (especially ethnographic) research on the cultures of the internet. It does so by considering how technology has been presented in turn as an epistemological boon and bane in methodological discourse around virtual or online ethnography, and cyberanthropology. It maps these discussions with regards to intellectual traditions and ambitions of ethnographic research and social science, and considers how these views of technology relate to modernist discourse about the value of (...)
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  7. Richard F. Beltramini (2003). Application of the Unfairness Doctrine to Marketing Communications on the Internet. Journal of Business Ethics 42 (4):393 - 400.
    The increased usage of marketing communications on the internet has presented a number of significant business ethics issues. And, while regulatory agencies have increased their vigilance in protecting consumers from injury, the uniqueness of business via the internet has challenged these agencies to respond in evolving ways. This paper provides a brief overview of the application of the FTC''s lesser known unfairness doctrine as a potential framework for better understanding emerging privacy and e-commerce issues, and specific examples are provided for (...)
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  8. J. -G. Bidima (2006). The Internet and the African Academic World. Diogenes 53 (3):93 - 100.
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  9. D. Birsch (2002). Gordon Graham, the Internet: A Philosophical Inquiry. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 4 (4):325-328.
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  10. Mary I. Bockover (2003). Confucian Values and the Internet: A Potential Conflict. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (2):159–175.
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  11. David Bourget (2010). Paperless Philosophy as a Philosophical Method. Social Epistemology 24 (4):363-375.
    I discuss the prospects for novel communication methods in academic research. I describe communication tools which could enhance the practice of conceptual analysis.
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  12. Norman E. Bowie & Karim Jamal (2006). Privacy Rights on the Internet: Self-Regulation or Government Regulation? Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (3):323-342.
    Abstract: Consumer surveys indicate that concerns about privacy are a principal factor discouraging consumers from shopping online. The key public policy issue regarding privacy is whether the US should follow its current self-regulation course (where the FTC encourages websites to obtain private “privacy web-seals”), or whether a European style formal legal regulation approach should be adopted in the US. We conclude that the use of assurance seals has worked reasonably well and websites should be free to decide whether they have (...)
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  13. Frances Brazier, Anja Oskamp, Corien Prins, Maurice Schellekens & Niek Wijngaards (2004). Law-Abiding and Integrity on the Internet: A Case for Agents. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 12 (1-2):5-37.
    Software agents extend the current, information-based Internet to include autonomous mobile processing. In most countries such processes, i.e., software agents are, however, without an explicit legal status. Many of the legal implications of their actions (e.g., gathering information, negotiating terms, performing transactions) are not well understood. One important characteristic of mobile software agents is that they roam the Internet: they often run on agent platforms of others. There often is no pre-existing relation between the owner of a running agents process (...)
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  14. Adam Briggle (2008). Real Friends: How the Internet Can Foster Friendship. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):71-79.
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  15. Amy Bruckman (2002). Studying the Amateur Artist: A Perspective on Disguising Data Collected in Human Subjects Research on the Internet. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (3):217-231.
    In the mid-1990s, the Internet rapidly changedfrom a venue used by a small number ofscientists to a popular phenomena affecting allaspects of life in industrialized nations. Scholars from diverse disciplines have taken aninterest in trying to understand the Internetand Internet users. However, as a variety ofresearchers have noted, guidelines for ethicalresearch on human subjects written before theInternet's growth can be difficult to extend toresearch on Internet users.In this paper, I focus on one ethicalissue: whether and to what extent to disguisematerial (...)
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  16. Hubertus Buchstein (1997). Bytes That Bite: The Internet and Deliberative Democracy. Constellations 4 (2):248-263.
  17. Katrina Burt (2009). The Internet – Proposing an Infrastructure for the Philosophy of Virtualness. Techne 13 (1):50-68.
    This paper proposes a preliminary infrastructure for future philosophical discourse on the virtual, interactive, visual, top layer of the Internet. The paper begins by introducing thoughts on such words as real, virtual, reality, knowledge, and truth. Next, news summaries are provided illustrating some effects from the “real world” on the virtual part of the Internet, and vice versa. Subsequently, nine major categories of Internet variables are identified. Finally, over one hundred questions about the philosophical nature of the virtual part of (...)
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  18. Dominique Cardon & Christophe Prieur (2009). Networks of Relations on the Internet: A Research Object for Information Technology and Social Sciences. In Bernard Reber & Claire Brossaud (eds.), Digital Cognitive Technologies: Epistemology and Knowledge Society. Iste Ltd.
  19. Jacques N. Catudal (1999). Censorship, the Internet, and the Child Pornography Law of 1996: A Critique. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 1 (2):105-115.
    After describing the Child Pornography Prevention Act (CPPA) of 1996, I argue that the Act ought to be significantly amended. The central objections to CPPA are (1) that it is so broad in its main proscriptions as to violate the First Amendment rights of adults; (2) that it altogether fails to provide minors and their legal guardians with the privacy rights needed to combat the harms associated with certain classes of prurient material on the Internet; and, (3) that the actual (...)
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  20. Louis C. Charland (2004). A Madness for Identity: Psychiatric Labels, Consumer Autonomy, and the Perils of the Internet. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (4):335-349.
  21. Craig A. Childress & Joy K. Asamen (1998). The Emerging Relationship of Psychology and the Internet: Proposed Guidelines for Conducting Internet Intervention Research. Ethics and Behavior 8 (1):19 – 35.
    The Internet is rapidly developing into an important medium of communication in modem society, and both psychological research and therapeutic interventions are being increasingly conducted using this new communication medium. As therapeutic interventions using the Internet are becoming more prevalent, it is becoming increasingly important to conduct research on psychotherapeutic Internet interventions to assist in the development of an appropriate standard of practice regarding interventions using this new medium. In this article, we examine the Internet and the current psychological uses (...)
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  22. Roger Clarke (1999). Ethics and the Internet. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 18 (3/4):153-167.
    This paper commences with an introductory segment that considers infonnation technology generally. This leads into a discussion of the Internet, which is important both in its own right and also because it is the primary instance of the notion of "information infrastructure." The concept cyberspace is introduced as a means of appreciating what it is that people who use the Internet experience. Building on this foundation, the presentation then briefly reviews ethical aspects of individual behaviour, communities, corporate behaviour, and governmental (...)
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  23. Steve Clarke (2007). Conspiracy Theories and the Internet: Controlled Demolition and Arrested Development. Episteme 4 (2):167-180.
    Abstract Following Clarke (2002), a Lakatosian approach is used to account for the epistemic development of conspiracy theories. It is then argued that the hypercritical atmosphere of the internet has slowed down the development of conspiracy theories, discouraging conspiracy theorists from articulating explicit versions of their favoured theories, which could form the hard core of Lakatosian research pro grammes. The argument is illustrated with a study of the “controlled demolition” theory of the collapse of three towers at the World Trade (...)
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  24. D. Clough (2000). The Message of the Medium: The Challenge of the Internet To the Church and Other Communities. Studies in Christian Ethics 13 (2):91-100.
    Imagine, if you can, a small room, hexagonal in shape, like the cell of a bee. It is lighted neither by window nor by lamp, yet it is filled with a soft radiance. There are no apertures for ventilation, yet the air is fresh. There are no musical instruments, and yet, at the moment that my meditation opens, this room is throbbing with melodious sounds. An armchair is in the centre, by its side a reading-desk — that is all the (...)
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  25. David Coady (2011). An Epistemic Defence of the Blogosphere. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (3):277-294.
    Alvin Goldman claims that the conventional media is in decline as a result of competition from the blogosphere, and that this is a threat to our epistemic wellbeing and, as a result, a threat to good democratic decision-making. He supports this claim with three common complaints about the blogosphere: first, that it is undermining professional journalism, second, that, unlike the conventional media, it lacks ‘balance’, and finally that it is a parasite on the conventional media. I defend the blogosphere against (...)
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  26. Göran Collste (2002). The Internet Doctor and Medical Ethics Ethical Implications of the Introduction of the Internet Into Medical Encounters. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (2):121-125.
    In this article, consultation via the Internet and the use of the Internet as a source of medical information is examined from an ethical point of view. It is argued that important ethical aspects of the clinical interaction, such as dialogue and trust will be difficult to realise in an Internet-consultation. Further, it is doubtful whether an Internet doctor will accept responsibility. However, medical information via the Internet can be a valuable resource for patients wanting to know more about their (...)
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  27. Jodi Dean (2003). Why the Net is Not a Public Sphere. Constellations 10 (1):95-112.
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  28. Denise E. DeLorme, George M. Sinkhan & Warren French (2001). Ethics and the Internet Issues Associated with Qualitative Research. Journal of Business Ethics 33 (4):271 - 286.
    This paper examines the need for standards to resolve ethical conflicts related to qualitative, on-line research. Practitioners working in the area of qualitative research gauged the breadth and depth of this need. Those practitioners identified several key ethical issues associated with qualitative on-line research, and felt that there should be a common ethics code to cover issues related to Internet research. They also identified challenges associated with the profession's acceptance of a unified code. The paper concludes by offering guidance in (...)
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  29. Jim Demmers & Dara O'Neil (2001). Leavers and Takers. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 5 (3):131-143.
    As pervasive as the use of the Internet has become in the United States, a huge percentage of the world’s population has yet to ever use a telephone. It seems ironic, then, that there is a concerted effort on the part of industrialized nations to first hook up their traditionally disadvantaged citizens to the Internet and second, to hook up citizens of developing nations. This paper addresses the universal access phenomenon by considering the growth of the Internet in terms of (...)
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  30. Hubert L. Dreyfus (2002). Anonymity Versus Commitment: The Dangers of Education on the Internet. [REVIEW] Educational Philosophy and Theory 34 (4):369–378.
    I shall translate Kierkegaard's account of the dangers and opportunities of what he called the Press into a critique of the Internet so as to raise the question: what contribution -- for good or ill -- can the World Wide Web, with its ability to deliver vast amounts of information to users all over the world, make to educators trying to pass on knowledge and to develop skills and wisdom in their students? I will then use Kierkegaard's three-stage answer to (...)
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  31. Hubert L. Dreyfus (1999). Anonymity Versus Commitment: The Dangers of Education on the Internet. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):369-378.
    I shall translate Kierkegaard's account of the dangers and opportunities of what he called the Press into a critique of the Internet so as to raise the question: what contribution -- for good or ill -- can the World Wide Web, with its ability to deliver vast amounts of information to users all over the world, make to educators trying to pass on knowledge and to develop skills and wisdom in their students? I will then use Kierkegaard's three-stage answer to (...)
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  32. Hubert L. Dreyfus (1999). Kierkegaard on the Internet: Anonymity Vs. Commitment in the Present Age. Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 1999 (1).
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