Most recently added entries found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
  1. added 2016-12-02
    Robert J. Rovetto (2016 Sept). The Orbital Space Environment and Space Situational Awareness Domain Ontology – Towards an International Information System for Space Data. In Proceedings of The Advanced Maui Optical and Space Surveillance Technologies (AMOS) Conference.
  2. added 2016-12-02
    Robert John Rovetto (2016). Ontology Archtecures for the Orbital Space Environment and Space Situational Awareness Domain. In Stefano Borgo, Loris Bozzato, Chiara Del Vescovo & Martin Homola (eds.), Proceedings of the Joint Ontology Workshops with the 9th International Conference on Formal Ontology in Information Systems. CEUR
    This paper applies some ontology architectures to the space domain, specifically the orbital and near-earth space environment and the space situational awareness domain. I briefly summarize local, single and hybrid ontology architectures, and offer potential space ontology architectures for each by showing how actual space data sources and space organizations would be involved.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. added 2016-12-02
    Robert J. Rovetto (2016). Orbital Space Environment and Space Situational Awareness Domain Ontology. In Stefano Borgo, Jean-Rémi Bourguet & Adrien Barton (eds.), CEUR workshop proceedings of The Joint Ontology Workshops, with the 9th International Conference of Formal Ontology for Information Systems (FOIS), Early Career Symposium. CEUR Scientific Workshops
  4. added 2016-11-29
    David Kreps (2017). Matter and Memory and Deep Learning. In Yasushi Hirai (ed.), Diagnoses of Matter and Memory. Shoshi-Shinsui
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. added 2016-11-26
    Alexey Bakhirev, MODELS AND LOGIC OF SUBJECTIVE REALITY. SUBJECTIVE WORLDS.
  6. added 2016-11-15
    Bas Rasmussen, Finding Structure in a Meditative State.
    I have been experimenting with meditation for a long time, but just recently I seem to have come across another being in there. It may just be me looking at me, but whatever it is, it is showing me some really interesting arrangements of colored balls. At first, I thought it was just random colors and shapes, but it became very ordered. It was like this being (me?) was trying to talk to me but couldn’t, so was showing me some (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. added 2016-11-15
    Bas Rasmussen, Finding Structure in a Meditative State.
    I have been experimenting with meditation for a long time, but just recently I seem to have come across another being in there. It may just be me looking at me, but whatever it is, it is showing me some really interesting arrangements of colored balls. At first, I thought it was just random colors and shapes, but it became very ordered. It was like this being (me?) was trying to talk to me but couldn’t, so was showing me some (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. added 2016-11-03
    Angus McCoss (2016). Quantum Deep Learning Triuniverse. Journal of Quantum Information Science 6 (4).
    An original quantum foundations concept of a deep learning computational Universe is introduced. The fundamental information of the Universe (or Triuniverse)is postulated to evolve about itself in a Red, Green and Blue (RGB) tricoloured stable self-mutuality in three information processing loops. The colour is a non-optical information label. The information processing loops form a feedback-reinforced deep learning macrocycle with trefoil knot topology. Fundamental information processing is driven by ψ-Epistemic Drive, the Natural appetite for information selected for advantageous knowledge. From its (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. added 2016-11-02
    Luke Kersten (2016). A Mechanistic Account of Wide Computationalism. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-17.
    The assumption that psychological states and processes are computational in character pervades much of cognitive science, what many call the computational theory of mind. In addition to occupying a central place in cognitive science, the computational theory of mind has also had a second life supporting “individualism”, the view that psychological states should be taxonomized so as to supervene only on the intrinsic, physical properties of individuals. One response to individualism has been to raise the prospect of “wide computational systems”, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. added 2016-10-27
    Claudio Gnoli (2016). Classifying Phenomena, Part 1: Dimensions. Knowledge Organization 43 (6):403-415.
    This is the first part of a study on the classification of phenomena. It starts by addressing the status of classification schemes among knowledge organization systems (KOSs), as some features of them have been overlooked in recent reviews of KOS types. It then considers the different dimensions implied in a KOS, which include: the observed phenomena, the cultural and disciplinary perspective under which they are treated, the features of documents carrying such treatment, the collections of such documents as managed in (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. added 2016-10-24
    Nicola Mößner & Philip Kitcher (forthcoming). Knowledge, Democracy, and the Internet. Minerva:1-24.
    The internet has considerably changed epistemic practices in science as well as in everyday life. Apparently, this technology allows more and more people to get access to a huge amount of information. Some people even claim that the internet leads to a democratization of knowledge. In the following text, we will analyze this statement. In particular, we will focus on a potential change in epistemic structure. Does the internet change our common epistemic practice to rely on expert opinions? Does it (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. added 2016-10-14
    Michael Starks, Wolpert, Chaitin and Wittgenstein on Impossibility, Incompleteness, the Limits of Computation, Theism and the Universe as Computer-the Ultimate Turing Theorem.
    I have read many recent discussions of the limits of computation and the universe as computer, hoping to find some comments on the amazing work of polymath physicist and decision theorist David Wolpert but have not found a single citation and so I present this very brief summary. Wolpert proved some stunning impossibility or incompleteness theorems (1992 to 2008-see arxiv.org) on the limits to inference (computation) that are so general they are independent of the device doing the computation, and even (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. added 2016-10-11
    Nicola Angius & Guglielmo Tamburrini (forthcoming). Explaining Engineered Computing Systems’ Behaviour: The Role of Abstraction and Idealization. Philosophy and Technology:1-20.
    This paper addresses the methodological problem of analysing what it is to explain observed behaviours of engineered computing systems, focusing on the crucial role that abstraction and idealization play in explanations of both correct and incorrect BECS. First, it is argued that an understanding of explanatory requests about observed miscomputations crucially involves reference to the rich background afforded by hierarchies of functional specifications. Second, many explanations concerning incorrect BECS are found to abstract away from descriptions of physical components and processes (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. added 2016-10-11
    Nicola Angius & Petros Stefaneas (2016). Discovering Empirical Theories of Modular Software Systems. An Algebraic Approach. In Vincent Müller (ed.), Computing and Philosophy: Selected Papers from IACAP 2014 (Synthese Library). Springer 99-115.
    This paper is concerned with the construction of theories of software systems yielding adequate predictions of their target systems’ computations. It is first argued that mathematical theories of programs are not able to provide predictions that are consistent with observed executions. Empirical theories of software systems are here introduced semantically, in terms of a hierarchy of computational models that are supplied by formal methods and testing techniques in computer science. Both deductive top-down and inductive bottom-up approaches in the discovery of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. added 2016-10-11
    Orly Stettiner (2014). From Silico to Vitro: Computational Models of Complex Biological Systems Reveal Real-World Emergent Phenomena. In Vincent C. Muller (ed.), Computing and Philosophy, Selected Papaers from IACAP 2014. Springer 133-147.
    Computer simulations constitute a significant scientific tool for promoting scientific understanding of natural phenomena and dynamic processes. Substantial leaps in computational force and software engineering methodologies now allow the design and development of large-scale biological models, which – when combined with advanced graphics tools – may produce realistic biological scenarios, that reveal new scientific explanations and knowledge about real life phenomena. A state-of-the-art simulation system termed Reactive Animation (RA) will serve as a study case to examine the contemporary philosophical debate (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. added 2016-10-11
    Orly Stettiner (2014). From Silico to Vitro: Computational Models of Complex Biological Systems Reveal Real-World Emergent Phenomena. In Vincent C. Muller (ed.), Computing and Philosophy, Selected Papaers from IACAP 2014. Springer 133-147.
    Computer simulations constitute a significant scientific tool for promoting scientific understanding of natural phenomena and dynamic processes. Substantial leaps in computational force and software engineering methodologies now allow the design and development of large-scale biological models, which – when combined with advanced graphics tools – may produce realistic biological scenarios, that reveal new scientific explanations and knowledge about real life phenomena. A state-of-the-art simulation system termed Reactive Animation (RA) will serve as a study case to examine the contemporary philosophical debate (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. added 2016-10-11
    J. M. Bishop (2009). A Cognitive Computation Fallacy? Cognition, Computations and Panpsychism. Cognitive Computation 1 (3):221-233.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. added 2016-10-11
    J. M. Bishop (2002). Dancing with Pixies: Strong Artificial Intelligence and Panpsychism. In J. M. Bishop (ed.), Views into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence. 360-379.
    The argument presented in this paper is not a direct attack or defence of the Chinese Room Argument (CRA), but relates to the premise at its heart, that syntax is not sufficient for semantics, via the closely associated propositions that semantics is not intrinsic to syntax and that syntax is not intrinsic to physics. However, in contrast to the CRA’s critique of the link between syntax and semantics, this paper will explore the associated link between syntax and physics. The main (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. added 2016-10-09
    Francesco Berto, Jacopo Tagliabue & Gabriele Rossi (2016). There’s Plenty of Boole at the Bottom: A Reversible CA Against Information Entropy. Minds and Machines 26 (4):341-357.
    “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom”, said the title of Richard Feynman’s 1959 seminal conference at the California Institute of Technology. Fifty years on, nanotechnologies have led computer scientists to pay close attention to the links between physical reality and information processing. Not all the physical requirements of optimal computation are captured by traditional models—one still largely missing is reversibility. The dynamic laws of physics are reversible at microphysical level, distinct initial states of a system leading to distinct final (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. added 2016-10-07
    Stefano Canali (2016). Big Data, Epistemology and Causality: Knowledge in and Knowledge Out in EXPOsOMICS. Big Data and Society 3 (2).
    Recently, it has been argued that the use of Big Data transforms the sciences, making data-driven research possible and studying causality redundant. In this paper, I focus on the claim on causal knowledge by examining the Big Data project EXPOsOMICS, whose research is funded by the European Commission and considered capable of improving our understanding of the relation between exposure and disease. While EXPOsOMICS may seem the perfect exemplification of the data-driven view, I show how causal knowledge is necessary for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. added 2016-10-03
    Lavinia Marin (2016). Schiță pentru o posibilă filosofie a digitalului. Revista de Filosofie (Romania) 63 (5):571-582.
    This article aims to develop the outline of a possible philosophy of the digital, as a proper philosophy with its own domain, questions, methods and own theories. The article starts by describing the crisis of liniar thinking undersood, following Vilém Flusser, as as a crisis of historical-causal thinking. Then the digital thinking is described as a new way of thinking which aims to become the dominant way of scientific explanation of our times, by replacing historical-causal explanations with numerical models. The (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. added 2016-09-30
    María G. Navarro (2016). Presentación. PolíTICa: Redes, Deliberación y Heurísticas Sociales. Dilemata. Revista Internacional de Éticas Aplicadas (22):i-iv.
    In the last forty years the number of specialized publications on deliberative democracy has increased steadily. Yet, today, one of the greatest challenges we still face today is to deepen into the knowledge of our actual and singular deliberative cultures. In order to achieve this, it is necessary that we use theoretical and methodological approaches that enable us to capture the inherent complexity to the specific forms of deliberation that are present in as different areas as that of politics, economics, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. added 2016-09-30
    María G. Navarro (2016). Reseña de 'El nuevo leviatán. Una historia política de la Red' de Enrique Alonso. [REVIEW] Dilemata (22):363-367.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. added 2016-09-27
    Michael Baurmann, Bernd Lahno, Uwe Matzat & Anton Leist (eds.) (2004). Trust and Community on the Internet. Lucius & Lucius (Analyse Und Kritik 26(1).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography