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Philosophy of Consciousness

Edited by David Chalmers (Australian National University, New York University)
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  1. Robert P. Abelson (1983). Commentary Points. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (4):591.
  2. Robert P. Abelson (1980). Searle's Argument is Just a Set of Chinese Symbols. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):424.
  3. William L. Abler (1978). Asymmetry and Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (2):277.
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  4. Mark Addis (2013). Response to Collins. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):427-429.
  5. Colin Allen (2001). [Book Chapter] (in Press).
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  6. J. Allsop (2000). Where There's No Will, There's One Way. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (6):69-69.
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  7. M. Cristina Amoretti (2007). D. Stoljar, Ignorance and Imagination. The Epistemic Origin of the Problem of Consciousness. Epistemologia 30 (2):373-374.
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  8. Jensine Andresen & R. K. C. Foreman (2000). Methodological Pluralism in the Study of Religion. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):11-12.
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  9. Adam Arico (2010). Folk Psychology, Consciousness, and Context Effects. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (3):371-393.
    Traditionally, the philosophical study of Folk Psychology has focused on how ordinary people (i.e., those without formal training in academic fields like Psychology, Cognitive Science, Philosophy of Mind, etc.) go about attributing mental states. Those working in this tradition have tended to focus primarily on intentional states, like beliefs and desires . Recently, though a body of work has emerged in the growing field of Experimental Philosophy that focuses on folk attributions of mental states that are not paradigmatically considered intentional. (...)
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  10. R. Arp (2007). Awareness and Consciousness: Switched-on Rheostats. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14:101-106.
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  11. Marcus Arvan (2013). A New Theory of Free Will. Philosophical Forum 44 (1):1-48.
    This paper shows that several live philosophical and scientific hypotheses – including the holographic principle and multiverse theory in quantum physics, and eternalism and mind-body dualism in philosophy – jointly imply an audacious new theory of free will. This new theory, "Libertarian Compatibilism", holds that the physical world is an eternally existing array of two-dimensional information – a vast number of possible pasts, presents, and futures – and the mind a nonphysical entity or set of properties that "read" that physical (...)
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  12. Thomas P. Bailey (1908). Organic Sensation and Organismic Feeling. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 5 (15):406-412.
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  13. Lynne Rudder Baker, Mind and Consciousness: 5 Questions.
    After an undergraduate degree with a major in mathematics, I turned to philosophy—in part because philosophy had all the interest of math (and logic) plus an indefinitely wide range of subject matter. I began philosophy at an intersection of metaphysics and philosophy of science. My dissertation, Ontological and Linguistic Aspects of Temporal Becoming, was on the philosophy of time. A convinced physicalist, I defended the idea that past, present and future (the A-series) are merely “mind-dependent.” I spent a year as (...)
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  14. Lynne Rudder Baker, With Science in Mind.
    In his Confessions, Augustine lamented, “What, then, is time? If no one asks me, I know: if I wish to explain it to one who asks, I know not.” In this respect, consciousness is like time. If no one asks me what consciousness is, I know. To pay attention to something is to become conscious of it. Indeed, everything with which I can be familiar ­­ from the sound of your footsteps to my own daydreams ­­ can be an object (...)
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  15. Lynne Rudder Baker (1992). Consciousness Explained. Review of Metaphysics 46 (2):398-399.
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  16. R. Balasubramanian (2011). Consciousness, Cognition and the Cognitive Apparatus in the Vedānta Tradition. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):54.
    A human being is a complex entity consisting of the Self (also known as Consciousness), mind, senses and the body. The Vedānta tradition holds that the mind, the senses and the body are essentially different from the Self or Consciousness. It is through consciousness that we are able to know the things of the world, making use of the medium of the mind and the senses. Furthermore, the mind, though material, is able to reveal things, borrowing the light from consciousness. (...)
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  17. Brian Beakley (1999). The Conscious Mind. Review of Metaphysics 52 (3):664-666.
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  18. Jacob Berger (2013). Perceptual Justification Outside of Consciousness. In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Springer. 137-145.
    In his (2011) paper “There It Is” and his (2014) précis “There It Was,” Benj Hellie develops a sophisticated semantics for perceptual justification according to which perceptions in good cases can be explained by intentional psychology and can justify beliefs, whereas bad cases of perception are defective and so cannot justify beliefs. Importantly, Hellie also affords consciousness a central role in rationality insofar as only those good cases of perception within consciousness can play a justificatory function. In this commentary, I (...)
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  19. Michel Bitbol, Is Consciousness Primary?
    Six arguments against the view that conscious experience derives from a material basis are reviewed. These arguments arise from epistemology, phenomenology, neuropsychology, and philosophy of quantum mechanics. It turns out that any attempt at proving that conscious experience is ontologically secondary to material objects both fails and brings out its methodological and existential primacy. No alternative metaphysical view is espoused (not even a variety of Spinoza’s attractive double-aspect theory). Instead, an alternative stance, inspired from F. Varela’s neurophenomenology is advocated. This (...)
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  20. Andreas Blank (2006). Michael Tye, Consciousness and Persons. Unity and Identity. Pragmatics and Cognition 14 (1):188-191.
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  21. Johannes Brandl (2009). Intentionality, Information, and Experience. In A. Hieke & H. Leitgeb (eds.), Reduction: Between the Mind and the Brain. Ontos Verlag. 12--9.
    The investigation of the mind has been one of the major concerns of our philosophical tradition and is still a dominant subject in modern philosophy and science. Many philosophers in the scientific tradition want to solve the "puzzles of the mind," but believe the "puzzles" to be puzzles of the brain. So, whilst the former think of the mental as something of its own kind, the latter deny that philosophy of mind has to do with anything else but the brain. (...)
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  22. Józef Bremer (2005). Jak to Jest Być Świadomym : Analityczne Teorie Umysłu a Problem Neuronalnych Podstaw Świadomości. Wydawn. Ifis Pan.
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  23. Manuel Bremer (2005). Lessons From Sartre for the Analytic Philosophy of Mind. Analecta Husserliana 88:63-85.
    There are positive and negative lessons from Sartre: - Taking up some of his ideas one may arrive at a better model of consciousness in the analytic philosophy of mind; representing some of his ideas within the language and the models of a functionalist theory of mind makes them more accessible and inte¬grates them into the wider picture. - Sartre, as any philosopher, errs at some points, I believe; but these errors may be instruc¬tive, especially in as much as they (...)
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  24. Jonathan Bricklin & W. James (2005). William James: The Notion of Consciousness --Communication Made (in French) at the 5th International Congress of Psychology, Rome, 30 April (a New Translation by Jonathan Bricklin). [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (7):55-64.
    I should like to convey to you some doubts which have occurred to me on the subject of the notion of consciousness that prevails in all our treatises on psychology.
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  25. Maria Brincker (2010). Sensorimotor Grounding and Reused Cognitive Domains. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):270--271.
    Anderson suggests that theories of sensorimotor grounding are too narrow to account for his findings of widespread supporting multiple different cognitive I call some of the methodological assumptions underlying this conclusion into question, and suggest that his examples reaffirm rather than undermine the special status of sensorimotor processes in cognitive evolution.
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  26. Richard Brown (2010). Editorial: Philosophers Facing Phenomenal Consciousness, Online. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (3-4):6-9.
    The first online philosophy conference was held in 2006, the second in 2007. <span class='Hi'>Thomas</span> Nadelhoffer and Eddy Nahmias organized both. I enjoyed these conferences and the spirit of discussion and inclusiveness that they encouraged. I found myself thinking that it would be really great if someone would do an online consciousness conference. After thinking about it I decided that I would try to organize the online consciousness conference myself. It turned out to be a lot of work but in (...)
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  27. Warren S. Brown (1997). Mac Kay's View of Conscious Agents in Dialogue: Speculations on the Embodiment of Soul. Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):497 – 505.
    Donald MacKay's description of the embodiment of an efficacious conscious mind is reviewed as a version of non-reductive physicalism. Particular focus is given to MacKay's analysis of the emergence of consciousness in the capacity for self-evaluation which results from informational feedback regarding the results of action. Unique to MacKay's posthumously published Gifford Lectures is his analysis of agents in dialog as a particular form of an environmental feedback loop. His analysis of dialog is reviewed and expanded to encompass concepts (...)
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  28. T. R. Burns & E. Engdahl (1998). The Social Construction of Mind: A Sociocultural Perspective on Language Based Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 4.
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  29. Tom R. Burns & Erik Engdahl (1998). The Social Construction of Consciousness. Part 1: Collective Consciousness and its Socio-Cultural Foundations. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (1):67-85.
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  30. G. L. C. (1963). Fundamental Physical Theory and the Concept of Consciousness. Review of Metaphysics 17 (1):145-145.
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  31. Claudio Calosi & Vincenzo Fano (2012). Coscienza e fisicalismo minimale. In Vincenzo Fano, Enrico Giannetto, Giulia Giannini & Pierluigi Graziani (eds.), Complessità e Riduzionismo. © ISONOMIA – Epistemologica, University of Urbino. 44-53.
    In questo lavoro si presenta un nuovo esperimento mentale che solleva un particolare problema per quello che possiamo chiamare “fisicalismo minimale” in filosofia della mente. In particolare si argomenta che il fisicalismo minimale o i) non è in grado di fornirne un resoconto adeguato dell’esperimento mentale presentato, o ii) viene costretto a fornire un resoconto che è fortemente in contrasto con la nostra immagine scientifica del mondo. Il problema sollevato è un particolare esempio di quelli che Chalmers (1996) definisce hard (...)
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  32. William Calvin, The Feeling of What Happens New York.
    Antonio R. Damasio , The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness . This is clearly a must-read book for anyone wanting a neurologist's perspective on one of the greatest of the unsolved mysteries, human consciousness and the ways in which it exceeds that of the other apes. By the author of Descartes' Error.
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  33. Jamie Carnie (2007). Blue Sky Thoughts: Colour, Consciosness and Reality. Marion Boyars.
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  34. R. H. S. Carpenter (1995). RMJ Cotterill: Autism, Intelligence and Consciousness [Book Review]«. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2:86.
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  35. D. Chakalov (1997). Dejan Rakovic and Djuro Koruga (Ed.), Consciousness: Scientific Challenge of the 21st Century. Journal of Consciousness Studies 4:287-288.
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  36. David J. Chalmers (2012). The Singularity: A Reply to Commentators. Journal of Consciousness Studies.
    I would like to thank the authors of the 26 contributions to this symposium on my article “The Singularity: A Philosophical Analysis”. I learned a great deal from the reading their commentaries. Some of the commentaries engaged my article in detail, while others developed ideas about the singularity in other directions. In this reply I will concentrate mainly on those in the first group, with occasional comments on those in the second. A singularity (or an intelligence explosion) is a rapid (...)
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  37. David J. Chalmers (1995). Explaining Consciousness: The'Hard Problem'. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (3):200-219.
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  38. Jack Chamberlain (2001). A Biologist Looks at the Study of Consciousness. Bioessays 23 (3):297-298.
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  39. Keith Chandler (1995). Descartes, Flanagan and Moody. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (4):358-359.
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  40. Chienchih Chi (2004). A Mistaken Sense in Consciousness. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (2):11-15.
    There is a mistaken sense in consciousness or phenomenal property. I propose that as a general term phenomenal property has no ontological status. When we understand consciousness as phenomenal properties in general to claim the irreducibility of the mind, we simply fall into a trap constructed by a mistaken concept.
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  41. Philippe Chuard (2011). Temporal Experiences and Their Parts. Philosophers' Imprint 11 (11).
    The paper develops an objection to the extensional model of time consciousness—the view that temporally extended events or processes, and their temporal properties, can be directly perceived as such. Importantly, following James, advocates of the extensional model typically insist that whole experiences of temporal relations between non-simultaneous events are distinct from mere successions of their temporal parts. This means, presumably, that there ought to be some feature(s) differentiating the former from the latter. I try to show why the extensional models (...)
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  42. Andy Clark (2009). Spreading the Joy? Why the Machinery of Consciousness is (Probably) Still in the Head. Mind 118 (472):963-993.
    Is consciousness all in the head, or might the minimal physical substrate for some forms of conscious experience include the goings on in the (rest of the) body and the world? Such a view might be dubbed (by analogy with Clark and Chalmers’s ( 1998 ) claims concerning ‘the extended mind’) ‘the extended conscious mind’. In this article, I review a variety of arguments for the extended conscious mind, and find them flawed. Arguments for extended cognition, I conclude, do not (...)
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  43. Austen Clark (2008). Phenomenal Properties: Some Models From Psychology and Philosophy. Philosophical Issues 18 (1):406-425.
    Forthcoming in Philosophical Issues, vol 18, Interdisciplinary Core Philosophy: The Metaphysics and Perception of Qualities. Alex Byrne & David Hilbert, section editors.
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  44. Austen Clark, Thoughts on Sensory Representation: A Commentary on S a Theory of Sentience Joseph Levine.
    1. Clark’s book is a detailed study of the nature of sensory representation. It is highly informed by empirical results in the psychology of perception, and philosophically rich and significant. I admire the book and learned a great deal from reading it. As it covers a wide range of topics, and as I have no overarching critique to present, in this commentary I will briefly address three issues that come up in the book: Clark’s relational type-identity thesis for sensory qualities, (...)
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  45. J. Clark (1994). 'Toward a Scientific Basis for Consciousness: University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, April 12th–17th 1994. Journal of Consciousness Studies 1:152-154.
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  46. Chris Clarke (2005). Being and Field Theory: Review Article. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (s 4-5):135-139.
    This article arises from the remarkably multi-faceted book Brain and Being edited by Gordon Globus and others, hereafter referred to as B&B. It raises questions (though not unusually, few answers) about several related areas: the way in which quantum theory might endow the physical matter of the brain with surprising, though still essentially classical, properties; the possibility that quantum field theory might shed a wholly new light on aspects of consciousness, in both the subjective and neurological approaches; and, at the (...)
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  47. G. Claxton (1999). John Picketing (Ed.), The Authority of Experience: Essays on Buddhism and Psychology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6:144-145.
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  48. Guy Claxton (1999). Moving the Cursor of Consciousness: Cognitive Science and Human Welfare. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (2-3):2-3.
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  49. Robert Clowes, Steve Torrance & Ron Chrisley (2007). Machine Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):7-14.
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  50. J. Cole (1998). Lawrence Weiskrantz, Consciousness Lost and Found. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5:252-253.
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