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Philosophy of Consciousness

Edited by David Chalmers (Australian National University, New York University)
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  1. Mark Addis (2013). Response to Collins. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):427-429.
  2. Colin Allen (2001). [Book Chapter] (in Press).
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  3. Adam Arico (2010). Folk Psychology, Consciousness, and Context Effects. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (3):371-393.
    Traditionally, the philosophical study of Folk Psychology has focused on how ordinary people (i.e., those without formal training in academic fields like Psychology, Cognitive Science, Philosophy of Mind, etc.) go about attributing mental states. Those working in this tradition have tended to focus primarily on intentional states, like beliefs and desires . Recently, though a body of work has emerged in the growing field of Experimental Philosophy that focuses on folk attributions of mental states that are not paradigmatically considered intentional. (...)
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  4. Marcus Arvan (2013). A New Theory of Free Will. Philosophical Forum 44 (1):1-48.
    This paper shows that several live philosophical and scientific hypotheses – including the holographic principle and multiverse theory in quantum physics, and eternalism and mind-body dualism in philosophy – jointly imply an audacious new theory of free will. This new theory, "Libertarian Compatibilism", holds that the physical world is an eternally existing array of two-dimensional information – a vast number of possible pasts, presents, and futures – and the mind a nonphysical entity or set of properties that "read" that physical (...)
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  5. Thomas P. Bailey (1908). Organic Sensation and Organismic Feeling. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 5 (15):406-412.
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  6. Lynne Rudder Baker, With Science in Mind.
    In his Confessions, Augustine lamented, “What, then, is time? If no one asks me, I know: if I wish to explain it to one who asks, I know not.” In this respect, consciousness is like time. If no one asks me what consciousness is, I know. To pay attention to something is to become conscious of it. Indeed, everything with which I can be familiar ­­ from the sound of your footsteps to my own daydreams ­­ can be an object (...)
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  7. R. Balasubramanian (2011). Consciousness, Cognition and the Cognitive Apparatus in the Vedānta Tradition. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):54.
    A human being is a complex entity consisting of the Self (also known as Consciousness), mind, senses and the body. The Vedānta tradition holds that the mind, the senses and the body are essentially different from the Self or Consciousness. It is through consciousness that we are able to know the things of the world, making use of the medium of the mind and the senses. Furthermore, the mind, though material, is able to reveal things, borrowing the light from consciousness. (...)
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  8. Jacob Berger (forthcoming). Perceptual Justification Outside of Consciousness. In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Springer.
    In his (2011) paper “There It Is” and his (2014) précis “There It Was,” Benj Hellie develops a sophisticated semantics for perceptual justification according to which perceptions in good cases can be explained by intentional psychology and can justify beliefs, whereas bad cases of perception are defective and so cannot justify beliefs. Importantly, Hellie also affords consciousness a central role in rationality insofar as only those good cases of perception within consciousness can play a justificatory function. In this commentary, I (...)
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  9. Reinaldo J. Bernal Velásquez (2012). E-Physicalism. A Physicalist Theory of Phenomenal Consciousness. Ontos Verlag.
    This work advances a theory in the metaphysics of phenomenal consciousness, which the author labels “e-physicalism”. Firstly, he endorses a realist stance towards consciousness and physicalist metaphysics. Secondly, he criticises Strong AI and functionalist views, and claims that consciousness has an internal character. Thirdly, he discusses HOT theories, the unity of consciousness, and holds that the “explanatory gap” is not ontological but epistemological. Fourthly, he argues that consciousness is not a supervenient but an emergent property, not reducible and endowed with (...)
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  10. Michel Bitbol, Is Consciousness Primary?
    Six arguments against the view that conscious experience derives from a material basis are reviewed. These arguments arise from epistemology, phenomenology, neuropsychology, and philosophy of quantum mechanics. It turns out that any attempt at proving that conscious experience is ontologically secondary to material objects both fails and brings out its methodological and existential primacy. No alternative metaphysical view is espoused (not even a variety of Spinoza’s attractive double-aspect theory). Instead, an alternative stance, inspired from F. Varela’s neurophenomenology is advocated. This (...)
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  11. Johannes Brandl (2009). Intentionality, Information, and Experience. In A. Hieke & H. Leitgeb (eds.), Reduction: Between the Mind and the Brain. Ontos Verlag. 12--9.
    The investigation of the mind has been one of the major concerns of our philosophical tradition and is still a dominant subject in modern philosophy and science. Many philosophers in the scientific tradition want to solve the "puzzles of the mind," but believe the "puzzles" to be puzzles of the brain. So, whilst the former think of the mental as something of its own kind, the latter deny that philosophy of mind has to do with anything else but the brain. (...)
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  12. Józef Bremer (2005). Jak to Jest Być Świadomym : Analityczne Teorie Umysłu a Problem Neuronalnych Podstaw Świadomości. Wydawn. Ifis Pan.
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  13. Manuel Bremer (2005). Lessons From Sartre for the Analytic Philosophy of Mind. Analecta Husserliana 88:63-85.
    There are positive and negative lessons from Sartre: - Taking up some of his ideas one may arrive at a better model of consciousness in the analytic philosophy of mind; representing some of his ideas within the language and the models of a functionalist theory of mind makes them more accessible and inte¬grates them into the wider picture. - Sartre, as any philosopher, errs at some points, I believe; but these errors may be instruc¬tive, especially in as much as they (...)
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  14. Jonathan Bricklin & W. James (2005). William James: The Notion of Consciousness --Communication Made (in French) at the 5th International Congress of Psychology, Rome, 30 April (a New Translation by Jonathan Bricklin). [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (7):55-64.
    I should like to convey to you some doubts which have occurred to me on the subject of the notion of consciousness that prevails in all our treatises on psychology.
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  15. Maria Brincker (2010). Sensorimotor Grounding and Reused Cognitive Domains. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):270--271.
    Anderson suggests that theories of sensorimotor grounding are too narrow to account for his findings of widespread supporting multiple different cognitive I call some of the methodological assumptions underlying this conclusion into question, and suggest that his examples reaffirm rather than undermine the special status of sensorimotor processes in cognitive evolution.
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  16. Warren S. Brown (1997). Mac Kay's View of Conscious Agents in Dialogue: Speculations on the Embodiment of Soul. Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):497 – 505.
    Donald MacKay's description of the embodiment of an efficacious conscious mind is reviewed as a version of non-reductive physicalism. Particular focus is given to MacKay's analysis of the emergence of consciousness in the capacity for self-evaluation which results from informational feedback regarding the results of action. Unique to MacKay's posthumously published Gifford Lectures is his analysis of agents in dialog as a particular form of an environmental feedback loop. His analysis of dialog is reviewed and expanded to encompass concepts (...)
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  17. William Calvin, The Feeling of What Happens New York.
    Antonio R. Damasio , The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness . This is clearly a must-read book for anyone wanting a neurologist's perspective on one of the greatest of the unsolved mysteries, human consciousness and the ways in which it exceeds that of the other apes. By the author of Descartes' Error.
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  18. Jamie Carnie (2007). Blue Sky Thoughts: Colour, Consciosness and Reality. Marion Boyars.
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  19. David J. Chalmers (2012). The Singularity: A Reply to Commentators. Journal of Consciousness Studies.
    I would like to thank the authors of the 26 contributions to this symposium on my article “The Singularity: A Philosophical Analysis”. I learned a great deal from the reading their commentaries. Some of the commentaries engaged my article in detail, while others developed ideas about the singularity in other directions. In this reply I will concentrate mainly on those in the first group, with occasional comments on those in the second. A singularity (or an intelligence explosion) is a rapid (...)
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  20. Jack Chamberlain (2001). A Biologist Looks at the Study of Consciousness. Bioessays 23 (3):297-298.
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  21. Chienchih Chi (2004). A Mistaken Sense in Consciousness. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (2):11-15.
    There is a mistaken sense in consciousness or phenomenal property. I propose that as a general term phenomenal property has no ontological status. When we understand consciousness as phenomenal properties in general to claim the irreducibility of the mind, we simply fall into a trap constructed by a mistaken concept.
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  22. Philippe Chuard (2011). Temporal Experiences and Their Parts. Philosophers' Imprint 11 (11).
    The paper develops an objection to the extensional model of time consciousness—the view that temporally extended events or processes, and their temporal properties, can be directly perceived as such. Importantly, following James, advocates of the extensional model typically insist that whole experiences of temporal relations between non-simultaneous events are distinct from mere successions of their temporal parts. This means, presumably, that there ought to be some feature(s) differentiating the former from the latter. I try to show why the extensional models (...)
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  23. Andy Clark (2009). Spreading the Joy? Why the Machinery of Consciousness is (Probably) Still in the Head. Mind 118 (472):963-993.
    Is consciousness all in the head, or might the minimal physical substrate for some forms of conscious experience include the goings on in the (rest of the) body and the world? Such a view might be dubbed (by analogy with Clark and Chalmers’s ( 1998 ) claims concerning ‘the extended mind’) ‘the extended conscious mind’. In this article, I review a variety of arguments for the extended conscious mind, and find them flawed. Arguments for extended cognition, I conclude, do not (...)
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  24. Austen Clark (2008). Phenomenal Properties: Some Models From Psychology and Philosophy. Philosophical Issues 18 (1):406-425.
    Forthcoming in Philosophical Issues, vol 18, Interdisciplinary Core Philosophy: The Metaphysics and Perception of Qualities. Alex Byrne & David Hilbert, section editors.
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  25. Austen Clark, Thoughts on Sensory Representation: A Commentary on S a Theory of Sentience Joseph Levine.
    1. Clark’s book is a detailed study of the nature of sensory representation. It is highly informed by empirical results in the psychology of perception, and philosophically rich and significant. I admire the book and learned a great deal from reading it. As it covers a wide range of topics, and as I have no overarching critique to present, in this commentary I will briefly address three issues that come up in the book: Clark’s relational type-identity thesis for sensory qualities, (...)
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  26. Allan Combs, Deryl Howard & Stanley Krippner (1996). A Question of Epistemology: Reflections on the Harman-Laszlo Dialogue. World Futures 47 (2):115-120.
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  27. Christian Coseru (2012). Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    What turns the continuous flow of experience into perceptually distinct objects? Can our verbal descriptions unambiguously capture what it is like to see, hear, or feel? How might we reason about the testimony that perception alone discloses? Christian Coseru proposes a rigorous and highly original way to answer these questions by developing a framework for understanding perception as a mode of apprehension that is intentionally constituted, pragmatically oriented, and causally effective. By engaging with recent discussions in phenomenology and analytic philosophy (...)
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  28. Tim Crane (2014). Aspects of Psychologism. Harvard University Press.
    Dummett is claiming, then, that Frege's attack on psychologism can be extended to views outside logic. Psycholo- gism in Dummett's discussion is a view about understanding the meanings of words ('grasp of sense'). Psychologism holds that  ...
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  29. Tim Crane (2002). Consciousness, the Awareness of the World and the Essence of the Mind. In Exploring Consciousness. Fondazione Carlo Erba. 35-45.
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  30. Tim Crane (2001). The Emergence of Consciousness. In The Emergence of the Mind. Fondazione Carlo Erba. 183-191.
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  31. Sean Crawford (ed.) (2010). Philosophy of Mind: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge.
    v. 1. Foundations -- v. 2. The mind-body problem -- v. 3. Intentionality -- v. 4. Consciousness.
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  32. John F. Crosby (1993). The Personhood of the Human Embryo. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (4):399-417.
    My interlocutor is anyone who denies peisonhood to the embryo on the grounds that a human person can exist only in conscious activity and that in the absence of consciousness a person cannot exist at all. I probe personal consciousness to the point at which the distinction between the being and the consciousness of the human person appears, and argue on the basis of this distinction that the being of a person can exist in the absence of any consciousness. I (...)
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  33. Manuel Curado (2007). Luz Misteriosa: A Consciência No Mundo Físico. Quasi Ediçoes.
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  34. Jake H. Davis & Evan Thompson (2013). From the Five Aggregates to Phenomenal Consciousness: Toward a Cross-Cultural Cognitive Science. In Steven M. Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. John Wiley & Sons.
    Buddhism originated and developed in an Indian cultural context that featured many first-person practices for producing and exploring states of consciousness through the systematic training of attention. In contrast, the dominant methods of investigating the mind in Western cognitive science have emphasized third-person observation of the brain and behavior. In this chapter, we explore how these two different projects might prove mutually beneficial. We lay the groundwork for a cross-cultural cognitive science by using one traditional Buddhist model of the mind (...)
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  35. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of McGinn, The Problem of Consciousness. [REVIEW]
    In other words, it's a perfect season for naysayers, and philosophers have risen to the occasion. The most radical is Colin McGinn, former Wilde Reader of Mental Philosophy at Oxford, who has recently taken a position at Rutgers University in New Jersey. The Problem of Consciousness is a collection of eight essays, two of which have not previously been published. McGinn's central thesis is that the problem of consciousness is systematically insoluble by us (Martians or demigods might have better luck). (...)
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  36. Paul Dickerson, Ben Robins & Kerstin Dautenhahn (2013). Where the Action Is: A Conversation Analytic Perspective on Interaction Between a Humanoid Robot, a Co-Present Adult and a Child with an ASD. Interaction Studies 14 (2):297-316.
    This paper examines interaction involving a child with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder, a humanoid robot and a co-present adult. In this paper data from one child (collected as part of the ROBOSKIN project) is analysed in order to evaluate the potential contributions of a conversation analytic perspective to the examination of data relating to socio-emotional reciprocity. The paper argues for the value of treating all interaction as potentially relevant, looking without carefully pre-defined target behaviours and examining behaviour within its specific (...)
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  37. Alfredo Dinis & José Manuel Curado (eds.) (2004). Consciência E Cognição. Faculdade de Filosofia de Braga, Universidade Católica Portuguesa.
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  38. Jochen Dreher (2005). The Baroque Formulation of Consciousness – Bridging the “Unbridgeable Gap” Through Indicational Representation. [REVIEW] Human Studies 28 (1):87 - 94.
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  39. Peter Francis Dziuban (2006). Consciousness is All: Now Life is Completely New. Blue Dolphin Pub..
    It really is true -- Fact : there is nothing greater than consciousness -- Consciousness is what you are -- Aliveness -- Fact : consciousness is the infinite itself -- Consciousness is not the "human mind" -- Whose life is it, anyway? -- The all-inclusiveness of consciousness -- To be God, God has to be -- Consciousness is neither physical nor metaphysical -- There is only one consciousness -- Consciousness is -- Fact : consciousness is what the present is -- (...)
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  40. Giolo Fele (2008). The Phenomenal Field: Ethnomethodological Perspectives on Collective Phenomena. [REVIEW] Human Studies 31 (3):299 - 322.
    The aim of my paper is twofold. First, I show how the notion of phenomenal field can be used to examine, describe and understand particular collective patterns pertaining to the everyday domain of our common social experience. Secondly, I outline the role of the notion of “phenomenal field” in ethnomethodology. I briefly discuss Gurwitsch’s notion of functional meaning. After presenting the argument, I show “the locally achieved ordinariness of a common task”, that is the lining up of the player of (...)
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  41. Luann D. Fortune (2011). Essences of Somatic Awareness as Captured in a Verbally Directed Body Scan. Schutzian Research 3:107-119.
    Somatic awareness is bodily sensation imbued with consciousness. Directing and cultivating somatic awareness is a practice fundamental to many therapeutic and spiritual enterprises. Recent developments in neuroscience attempt to explain the operational aspects of somatic awareness. But it has long been a topic of conversation in other paradigms, from philosophy to health care. Somatic input provides information for use in wellness treatment applications, including therapeutic bodywork. Yet few massage therapy scholarly investigations aim to capture the quality of body awareness experience. (...)
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  42. Stan Franklin (2011). Global Workspace Theory, Shanahan, and Lida. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (02):327-337.
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  43. Eliott Park Frost (1913). The Belief in Consciousness. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 10 (26):716-719.
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  44. Shaun Gallagher, Postmetaphysical Postmodern Posturing.
    Is it possible to develop a discourse that describes human experience but avoids theoretical concepts such as consciousness and qualia, and do so in such a way that the difficult problems are resolved? It strikes me that Gordon Globus is attempting to do something like this. It seems an honorable project from the perspectives of both the analytic philosophy of mind and the postmodern celebration of multiple discourses. I want to suggest, however, that in his account the problems of qualia (...)
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  45. Karen Gloy (2009). Kollektives Und Individuelles Bewusstsein. Wilhelm Fink.
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  46. Lorna Green, Consciousness and the Scheme of Things: A New Copernican Revolution, A Comprehensive New Theory of Consciousness (Submitted February 2010, Published February 2011). [REVIEW]
    Consciousness is more important than the Higgs-Bosen particle. Consciousness has emerged as a term, and a problem, in modern science. Most scientists believe that it can be accomodated and explained, by existing scientific principles. I say that it cannot, that it calls all existing principles into question, and so I propose a New Copernican Revolution among our fundamental terms. I say that consciousness points completely beyond present day science, to a whole new view of the universe, where consciousness, and not (...)
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  47. Lorna Green, Of Myself 2012.
    Consciousness is the true basis of the universe. Here is a story of how I came to this understanding, and where it has led me.
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  48. Lorna Green, The Essence of My Work: A Brief Precis 2012.
    Consciousness is more important than the Higgs-Bosen particle, because the whole of present day science founders on it. Consciousness is the true basis of the universe, and what this means for modern science, philosophy, religion, the earth, the universe, woman and men, the modern world, and where we are in our history, and with them, a new and truw firm footing, a whole new thought foundation, for civilization iteself, and a viable rooted future, the reappearance if the feminine, the advent (...)
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  49. Lorna Green, The Great Philosophers: Where They Missed It and Why.
    The great philosophers missed it, and here are the reasons why, how to bring them all up to date, a woman's take on things, with new categories and concepts, like love, oneness, the feminine, the earth, Spirit, the end of the old order, and the beginning of the new.
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  50. Donald R. Griffin (2010). Windows on Nonhuman Minds. In Michel Weber & Anderson Weekes (eds.), Process Approaches to Consciousness in Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. State University of New York Press.
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