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  1. Cheryl E. Abbate (2014). Nonhuman Animals: Not Necessarily Saints or Sinners. Between the Species 17 (1):1-30.
    Higher-order thought theories maintain that consciousness involves the having of higher-order thoughts about mental states. In response to these theories of consciousness, an attempt is often made to illustrate that nonhuman animals possess said consciousness, overlooking an alarming consequence: attributing higher-order thought to nonhuman animals might entail that they should be held morally accountable for their actions. I argue that moral responsibility requires more than higher-order thought: moral agency requires a specific higher-order thought which concerns a belief about the rightness (...)
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  2. Mahesh Ananth (2010). The Scientific Study of Consciousness: Searle’s Radical Request. Psyche 16 (2):59-89.
    John Searle offers what he thinks to be a reasonable scientific approach to the understanding of consciousness. I argue that Searle is demanding nothing less than a Kuhnian-type revolution with respect to how scientists should study consciousness given his rejection of the subject-object distinction and affirmation of mental causation. As part of my analysis, I reveal that Searle embraces a version of emergentism that is in tension, not only with his own account, but also with some of the theoretical tenets (...)
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  3. Enrique Aramendia Muneta (2013). La visión en Marr y Berkeley. El problema de perderse el principio de la película. Daimon: Revista de Filosofia 59:125-144.
    Se comparan las teorías de Marr y Berkeley sobre la visión a partir de las cualidades de Descartes. La descripción de tres niveles de Marr, donde la conciencia está ausente, contrasta con el nivel único de Berkeley construido sobre la conciencia y la experiencia carece de importancia en los momentos esquemáticos y cobra protagonismo en el último paso del proceso de la visión de Marr mediante la noción de marcación. Bajo la premisa de que las descripciones puramente sincrónicas han de (...)
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  4. David M. Armstrong & Norman Malcolm (1984). Consciousness and Causality: A Debate on the Nature of Mind. Blackwell.
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  5. Stephen Asma, Jaak Panksepp, Rami Gabriel & Glennon Curran (2012). Philosophical Implications of Affective Neuroscience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (3-4):6-48.
    These papers are based on a Symposium at the COGSCI Conference in 2010. 1. Naturalizing the Mammalian Mind 2. Modularity in Cognitive Psychology and Affective Neuroscience 3. Affective Neuroscience and the Philosophy of Self 4. Affective Neuroscience and Law.
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  6. Hiranmoy Banerjee (2003). Perspectives on Consciousness. New Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal.
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  7. S. S. Barlingay (1976). Awareness. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 4 (October):83-96.
  8. Gary Bartlett (2012). The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):451 - 455.
  9. Tim Bayne, Axel Cleeremans & Patrick Wilken (eds.) (2009). The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    Five years in the making and including over 250 concise entries written by leaders in the field, the volume covers both fundamental knowledge as well as more ...
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  10. Ned Block (2007). Consciousness, Function, and Representation: Collected Papers, Volume. Oxford University Press.
    The first of a planned two-volume collection of Ned Block's writings on philosophy of mind; this volume treats consciousness, functionalism, and representation ...
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  11. Ned Block (2004). Consciousness. In R. L. Gregory (ed.), R. Gregory Oxford Companion to the Mind, Second Edition 2004. Oxford University Press
    There are two broad classes of empirical theories of consciousness, which I will call the biological and the functional. The biological approach is based on empirical correlations between experience and the brain. For example, there is a great deal of evidence that the neural correlate of visual experience is activity in a set of occipetotemporal pathways, with special emphasis on the infero-temporal cortex. The functionalist approach is a successor of behaviorism, the view that mentality can be seen as tendencies to (...)
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  12. Ned Block (2003). Philosophical Issues About Consciousness. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group
    There are a number of different matters that come under the heading of ‘consciousness’. One of them is phenomenality, the feeling of say a sensation of red or a pain, that is what it is like to have such a sensation or other experience. Another is reflection on phenomenality. Imagine two infants, both of which have pain, but only one of which has a thought about that pain. Both would have phenomenal states, but only the latter would have a state (...)
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  13. Ned Block, Owen J. Flanagan & Guven Guzeldere (eds.) (1997). The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical Debates. MIT Press.
    " -- "New Scientist" Intended for anyone attempting to find their way through the large and confusingly interwoven philosophical literature on consciousness, ..
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  14. Gregg Caruso (2015). If Consciousness is Necessary for Moral Responsibility, Then People Are Less Responsible Than We Think. Journal of Consciousness Studies 22 (7-8):49-60.
  15. Gregg Caruso (2015). Précis of Neil Levy’s Consciousness and Moral Responsibility. Journal of Consciousness Studies 22 (7-8):7-15.
  16. Gregg Caruso (2012). Free Will and Consciousness: A Determinist Account of the Illusion of Free Will. Lexington Books.
    In recent decades, with advances in the behavioral, cognitive, and neurosciences, the idea that patterns of human behavior may ultimately be due to factors beyond our conscious control has increasingly gained traction and renewed interest in the age-old problem of free will. In this book I examine both the traditional philosophical problems long associated with the question of free will, such as the relationship between determinism and free will, as well as recent experimental and theoretical work directly related to consciousness (...)
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  17. Joseph S. Catalano (2000). Thinking Matter: Consciousness From Aristotle to Putnam and Sartre. Routledge.
    While many contemporary philosophers have downplayed the significance of the body and subscribed to a brain/body dualism in human consciousness, Joseph S. ..
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  18. David J. Chalmers (2003). Consciousness and its Place in Nature. In Stephen P. Stich & Ted A. Warfield (eds.), Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell 102--142.
    Consciousness fits uneasily into our conception of the natural world. On the most common conception of nature, the natural world is the physical world. But on the most common conception of consciousness, it is not easy to see how it could be part of the physical world. So it seems that to find a place for consciousness within the natural order, we must either revise our conception of consciousness, or revise our conception of nature. In twentieth-century philosophy, this dilemma is (...)
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  19. David J. Chalmers (1999). Precis of The Conscious Mind. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (2):435-438.
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  20. David J. Chalmers (1996). The Conscious Mind: In Search of a Fundamental Theory. Oxford University Press.
    The book is an extended study of the problem of consciousness. After setting up the problem, I argue that reductive explanation of consciousness is impossible , and that if one takes consciousness seriously, one has to go beyond a strict materialist framework. In the second half of the book, I move toward a positive theory of consciousness with fundamental laws linking the physical and the experiential in a systematic way. Finally, I use the ideas and arguments developed earlier to defend (...)
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  21. David John Chalmers (2010). The Character of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    What is consciousness? How does the subjective character of consciousness fit into an objective world? How can there be a science of consciousness? In this sequel to his groundbreaking and controversial The Conscious Mind, David Chalmers develops a unified framework that addresses these questions and many others. Starting with a statement of the "hard problem" of consciousness, Chalmers builds a positive framework for the science of consciousness and a nonreductive vision of the metaphysics of consciousness. He replies to many critics (...)
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  22. Amita Chatterjee (ed.) (2003). Perspectives on Consciousness. New Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal.
  23. Paul M. Churchland & Patricia S. Churchland (2003). Recent Work on Consciousness: Philosophical, Theoretical, and Empirical. In Naoyuki Osaka (ed.), Neural Basis of Consciousness. Amsterdam: J Benjamins 49--123.
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  24. Allan Combs (2009). Consciousness Explained Better: Towards an Integral Understanding of the Multifaceted Nature of Consciousness. Paragon House.
    Foreword -- Introduction -- A word worn smooth -- Never at rest -- Four streams of experience -- From one great blooming, buzzing confusion -- The adult mind -- States and structures of consciousness -- The hierarchy of minds -- Horizontal and vertical evolution of consciousness -- The many faces of integral consciousness.
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  25. Mark Crooks (2011). Consciousness: Sentient and Rational. Journal of Mind and Behavior 32 (3).
    The evolution of nervous systems culminating in human consciousness might best be studied through an analysis of wakefulness and its constituent functions of sentience and cognition. The operative assumption in this model is that wakefulness emerged at the dawn of phylogeny and has been successively in-formed by an increasing complexity of sensory and cognitive functions. Wakefulness constitutes the essence of human consciousness but the cognitive and sentient functions complicate the analysis of the forms of awareness afforded to lower species. Folk (...)
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  26. Edward D'angelo & Ed D'Angelo (1988). "The Choreography of the Soul": Recursive Patterns in Psychology, Political Anthropology and Cosmology. Dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook
    The component structures of two distinct neuropsychological systems are described. "System-Y" depends upon "system-X" which, on the other hand, can operate independently of system-Y. System-X provides a matrix upon which system-Y must operate, and, system-Y is transformed by the operations of system-X. In addition these neuropsychological structures reverberate in political history and in the cosmos. The most fundamental structure in the soul, in society, and in the cosmos, has the form of a conical spiral. It can be described mathematically as (...)
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  27. Martin Davies & Glyn W. Humphreys (1993). Consciousness: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Blackwell.
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  28. Daniel C. Dennett (2001). Consciousness: How Much is That in Real Money? In Richard L. Gregory (ed.), Oxford Companion to the Mind. Oxford University Press
  29. W. H. Dittrich (1999). More Mysteries About Consciousness? Book Review of Davies & Humphreys on Consciousness. Philosophical Explorations.
    This commentary is a plea to re-read after five years one, as it seems, almost forgotten book which has nevertheless clearly influenced the development of empirical approaches to consciousness. The book provides an illuminating look at the early period to the modern revival of consciousness research. Its subtitle 'Psychological and Philosophical Essays' describes the book's range precisely. Early attempts to disect the mystery of consciousness and many themes that are still preoccupying modern consciousness research are covered. While some areas of (...)
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  30. Andreas Elpidorou (2013). Having It Both Ways: Consciousness, Unique Not Otherworldly. Philosophia 41 (4):1181-1203.
    I respond to Chalmers’ (2006, 2010) objection to the Phenomenal Concept Strategy (PCS) by showing that his objection is faced with a dilemma that ultimately undercuts its force. Chalmers argues that no version of PCS can posit psychological features that are both physically explicable and capable of explaining our epistemic situation. In response, I show that what Chalmers calls ‘our epistemic situation’ admits either of a phenomenal or of a topic-neutral characterization, neither of which supports Chalmers’ objection. On the one (...)
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  31. Owen J. Flanagan (1992). Consciousness Reconsidered. MIT Press.
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  32. Owen J. Flanagan (1991). Consciousness. In The Science of the Mind. MIT Press
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  33. Owen J. Flanagan & Guven Guzeldere (1997). Consciousness: A Philosophical Tour. In M. Ito, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.), Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press
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  34. Hans Flohr (2002). Die physiologischen Grundlagen des Bewußtseins. In Elbert & Birbaumer (eds.), Enzyklopädie der Psychologie,Serie1,Bd.6 : Biologische Grundlagen der Psychologie. Hogrefe 35-86.
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  35. Jeffrey E. Foss (2000). Science and the Riddle of Consciousness: A Solution. Springer Netherlands.
    The questions examined in the book speak directly to neuroscientists, computer scientists, psychologists, and philosophers.
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  36. Ellen Fridland (2011). Review of Christopher Hill's Consciousness. [REVIEW] Philosophical Inquiry 35 (3-4):112-114.
  37. Martina Fürst (2014). A Dualist Account of Phenomenal Concepts. In Andrea Lavazza & Howard Robinson (eds.), Contemporary Dualism. A Defense. 112-135. Routledge 112-135.
    The phenomenal concept strategy is considered a powerful response to anti-physicalist arguments. This physicalist strategy aims to provide a satisfactory account of dualist intuitions without being committed to ontological dualist conclusions. In this paper I first argue that physicalist accounts of phenomenal concepts fail to explain their cognitive role. Second, I develop an encapsulation account of phenomenal concepts that best explains their particularities. Finally, I argue that the encapsulation account, which features self-representing experiences, implies non-physical referents. Therefore, the account of (...)
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  38. Rocco J. Gennaro, Consciousness. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  39. Alfred Gierer (1985). die physik, das leben und die seele. Piper.
    This book (in German) on "Physics, life and mind" is on the physical foundations of modern biology. The basic features of living systems, reproduction, mutation and metabolism, can be explained in terms of molecular processes involving nucleic acids as genetic material, and proteins as catalysts. The generation of structure and form in each generation results from spatiotemporal gene regulation in conjunction with the de novo formation of spatial order in which interplays of activation and inhibition play a crucial part. Brain (...)
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  40. Ben Goertzel (2011). Hyperset Models of Self, Will and Reflective Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (01):19-53.
  41. Attila Grandpierre (1997). The Physics of Collective Consciousness. World Futures 48 (1):23-56.
    ABSTRACT: It is pointed out that the organisation of an organism necessarily involves fields which are the only means to make an approximately simultaneous tuning of the different subsystems of the organism-as-a-whole. Nature uses the olfactory fields, the acoustic fields, the electromagnetic fields and quantum-vacuum fields. Fields with their ability to comprehend the whole organism are the natural basis of a global interaction between organisms and of collective consciousness. Evidences are presented that electromagnetic potential fields mediate the collective field of (...)
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  42. Jeffrey A. Gray (1995). Consciousness: What is the Problem and How Should It Be Addressed? Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (1):5-9.
    [opening paragraph]: Imagine you are a scientist from Mars observing Gary Kasparov playing a tournament with a chess computer. Would you have any reason to postulate consciousness in one player, but not the other? What is consciousness? How does the body produce it, and what is it for? Most people do not realize that there is a problem here because our conscious experience is the thing we know best. We are all familiar with the colours, smells and scenes around us, (...)
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  43. Richard Gray (2003). Recent Work on Consciousness. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 11 (1):101-107.
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  44. Richard L. Gregory (1988). Consciousness in Science and Philosophy: Conscience and Con-Science. In Anthony J. Marcel & E. Bisiach (eds.), Consciousness in Contemporary Science. Oxford University Press
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  45. Patrick Grüneberg (2013). Projektives Bewusstsein. Th. Metzingers Selbstmodelltheorie und J.G. Fichtes Wissenschaftslehre. Mentis.
    Bewusstsein ist nicht ohne Grund eines der grundlegenden Themen philosophischer Forschung: Es bildet den Kristallisationspunkt, in dem sich die intime Sphäre unserer Persönlichkeit im Schnittfeld mit radikal Anderem artikuliert. Dabei kommt dem subjektiven Bezug auf eine objektive Wirklichkeit, sprich auf uns selbst wie auf unsere natürliche und soziale Umgebung, eine zentrale Funktion zu. Aufgrund seiner Selbstverständlichkeit wird dieser Ausgriff auf die Wirklichkeit jedoch in repräsentationalistischen Ansätzen, die einen Großteil aktueller Bewusstseinstheorie ausmachen, häufig unhinterfragt vorausgesetzt. Dieses Buch entwickelt demgegenüber einen relationalen (...)
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  46. Güven Güzeldere (1997). The Many Faces of Consciousness: A Field Guide. In Ned Block, Owen Flanagan & Güven Güzeldere (eds.), The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical Debates. The MIT Press 1-345.
    This dissertation argues for a "bundle thesis" of phenomenal consciousness: that the ways things seem to subjects are constituted by bundles of representational and functional properties. I argue that qualia are determined not only by intrinsic properties, but also by relational properties to other bodily and mental states . The view developed on the basis of this claim is called "phenomenal holism." ;Part I examines the current literature on phenomenal consciousness, sorting out various conceptual and historical issues. In particular, I (...)
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  47. Guven Guzeldere (1995). Consciousness: What It is, How to Study It, What to Learn From its History. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (1):30-51.
    This article is a version of the first half of an introduction to an anthology on consciousness. It is aimed at tracing the study of consciousness in psychology roughly since psychology pulled itself apart from philosophy as an independent discipline in the late nineteenth century. The second half, which will appear as a sequel to the present article, will cover the various philosophical problems involving consciousness, and trace the consciousness debate to date. The two articles are intended as a general (...)
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  48. Guven Guzeldere (1995). Problems of Consciousness: A Perspective on Contemporary Issues, Current Debates. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (2):112-43.
    This article is the second and final part of a general introduction to the concept, history, and problems of consciousness. The first was an overview of the study of consciousness in the history of psychology; this essay attempts to lay out the contemporary problems of consciousness and uncover their philosophical foundations. Together they serve as a prelude to the forthcoming special issue `Explaining Consciousness -- The Hard Problem'.
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  49. Alastair Hannay (1990). Human Consciousness. Routledge.
    CHAPTER I The Problem I have been accused of denying consciousness, but I am not conscious of having done so. Consciousness is to me a mystery, ..
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  50. Alastair Hannay (1987). The Claims of Consciousness: A Critical Survey. Inquiry 30 (December):395-434.
    This article selectively surveys recent work touching consciousness. It discusses some recent arguments and positions with a view to throwing light on a working principle of much influential philosophical psychology, namely that the first?person point of view is theoretically redundant. The discussion is divided under a number of headings corresponding to specific functions that have been attributed to the first?person viewpoint, from the experience of something it is like to undergo physical processes, to the presence of selfhood, mental substance, meaning, (...)
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