This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
164 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 164
  1. B. Abramenko (1954). The Age of the Universe. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (19):237-252.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. J. Agassi (1958). Koyré on the History of Cosmology. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 9 (35):234-245.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. J. Agassi (1958). Review: Koyré on the History of Cosmology. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 9 (35):234 - 245.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. John R. Albright (2000). Cosmology: What One Needs to Know. Zygon 35 (1):173-180.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Massimiliano Badino, The Concept of Infinity in Modern Cosmology.
    The aim of this paper is not only to deal with the concept of infinity, but also to develop some considerations about the epistemological status of cosmology. These problems are connected because from an epistemological point of view, cosmology, meant as the study of the universe as a whole, is not merely a physical (or empirical) science. On the contrary it has an unavoidable metaphysical character which can be found in questions like “why is there this universe (or a universe (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Yuri Balashov, Two Theories of the Universe.
    Cosmology as Weltanschauung is as old as the world. Cosmology as a physical discipline, however, is a child of this century, born in 1917, when Albert Einstein and Willem de Sitter first applied the theory of general relativity to the space-time of the entire universe. When did the child come of age and become a fully-fledged science? A popular myth shared by many practitioners holds that this did not happen until 1965, when the discovery of the 2.7K cosmic microwave background (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Rodney Bartlett, Mathematics' Poincare Conjecture and The Shape of the Universe. Tomorrow's Science Today.
    intro to Part 1 - -/- Most people disliked mathematics when they were at school and they were absolutely correct to do so. This is because maths as we know it is severely incomplete. No matter how elaborated and complicated mathematical equations become, in today's world they're based on 1+1=2. This certainly conforms to the world our physical senses perceive and to the world scientific instruments detect. It has been of immeasurable value to all knowledge throughout history and has elevated (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Oleg Bazaluk (ed.) (2010). Philosophy and Cosmology 2010 (The Journal of International Society of Philosophy and Cosmology (ISPC) ). ISPC.
    The Journal «Philosophy and Cosmology» (ISSN 2307-3705) was established by Oleg Bazaluk as a press organ of International Society of Philosophy and Cosmology at 2004. This Society was established in the setting of Pereyaslav-Khmelnitskiy State Pedagogical University. Initially the Journal was printed as a special edition of Ukrainian philosophical journal «Sententiae» (one’s Chief Editor is Oleg Khoma) and covered academic scientific, philosophical and amateur researches of the space problematic. Since 2008, Journal «Philosopy and Cosmology» is an independent printed issue at (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Oleg Bazaluk (ed.) (2009). Philosophy and Cosmology 2009 (The Journal of International Society of Philosophy and Cosmology (ISPC) ). ISPC.
    Philosophy and Cosmology is an open access, peer-reviewed and refereed journal that focuses on theoretical and conceptual problems and issues in philosophical and cosmological research. Philosophy and Cosmology is published by International Society of Philosophy and Cosmology. The objective of Philosophy and Cosmology is to promote exchange and collaboration among philosophers, social, technical and natural science researchers throughout the world. In pursuit of this objective the journal not only publishes high quality research papers but also ensures that the published papers (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Oleg Bazaluk (2009). World Existence and “Evolved Matter” as its Modern Model. Philosophy and Cosmology 1 (1):3-37.
    Along the strike of this article we’ll try to perform two tasks. The first one is to review the world existence but not in form of concept but in form of modern scientific-philosophic system of views on the Universe structure and on the processes of formation and development of non-organic world, worlds of life and intelligence. The second one is to answer the question “what is the essence of human life?” through the scientific-philosophic understanding of the world existence.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Oleg Bazaluk (ed.) (2008). Philosophy and Cosmology 2008 (The Journal of International Society of Philosophy and Cosmology (ISPC) ). ISPC.
    Philosophy and Cosmology is an open access, peer-reviewed and refereed journal that focuses on theoretical and conceptual problems and issues in philosophical and cosmological research. Philosophy and Cosmology is published by International Society of Philosophy and Cosmology. The objective of Philosophy and Cosmology is to promote exchange and collaboration among philosophers, social, technical and natural science researchers throughout the world. In pursuit of this objective the journal not only publishes high quality research papers but also ensures that the published papers (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Oleg Bazaluk (2003). T I M E in the Light of a New Cosmological Conception. Porogi.
    This small book continues the theoretical study on the structure of the universe. It examines the category of “time” in the light of a new cosmological model proposed by the author in his book “The Origin of Mankind”. It is generally accepted that after researches of A. Einstein, А. Minkovsky and others space and time are considered in their interrelation, as the continuum. Nevertheless, the category of “time” is still a bone of contention and a cause of a great deal (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Claus Beisbart (2009). Can We Justifiably Assume the Cosmological Principle in Order to Break Model Underdetermination in Cosmology? Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 40 (2):175 - 205.
    If cosmology is to obtain knowledge about the whole universe, it faces an underdetermination problem: Alternative space-time models are compatible with our evidence. The problem can be avoided though, if there are good reasons to adopt the Cosmological Principle (CP), because, assuming the principle, one can confine oneself to the small class of homogeneous and isotropic space-time models. The aim of this paper is to ask whether there are good reasons to adopt the Cosmological Principle in order to avoid underdetermination (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  14. Enrico Bellone, Livio Gratton, Oddone Longo, Nicola Badaloni, Dieter Wandschneider, Paolo Zellini, Halton C. Arp, Carlo Sini, Jean Heidmann, Jean-Claude Pecker, Fred Hoyle, Jayant V. Narlikar, Geoffrey Burbidge & Umberto Curi (eds.) (1989). Kosmos. La cosmologia tra scienza e filosofia. Corbo.
  15. Paul Bishop (ed.) (2012). The Archaic: The Past in the Present: A Collection of Papers. Routledge.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Paul Bishop (ed.) (2012). The Archaic: The Past in the Present. Routledge.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Carmen Blacker, Michael Loewe & J. Martin Plumley (eds.) (1975). Ancient Cosmologies. Allen and Unwin.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18. Kimberly K. Boddy, Sean M. Carroll & Jason Pollack (forthcoming). De Sitter Space Without Dynamical Quantum Fluctuations. Foundations of Physics:1-34.
    We argue that, under certain plausible assumptions, de Sitter space settles into a quiescent vacuum in which there are no dynamical quantum fluctuations. Such fluctuations require either an evolving microstate, or time-dependent histories of out-of-equilibrium recording devices, which we argue are absent in stationary states. For a massive scalar field in a fixed de Sitter background, the cosmic no-hair theorem implies that the state of the patch approaches the vacuum, where there are no fluctuations. We argue that an analogous conclusion (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. James E. Brady (2003). Southern Mexico and Guatemala: In My Hill, in My Valley : The Importance of Place in Ancient Maya Ritual. In Douglas Sharon & James Edward Brady (eds.), Mesas & Cosmologies in Mesoamerica. San Diego Museum of Man
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Rémi Brague (2003). The Wisdom of the World: The Human Experience of the Universe in Western Thought. University of Chicago Press.
    When the ancient Greeks looked up into the heavens, they saw not just sun and moon, stars and planets, but a complete, coherent universe, a model of the Good that could serve as a guide to a better life. How this view of the world came to be, and how we lost it (or turned away from it) on the way to becoming modern, make for a fascinating story, told in a highly accessible manner by Remi Brague in this wide-ranging (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  21. Dan Bruiger, An Argument for a Second-Order Cosmology.
    This paper proposes the feasibility of a second-order approach in cosmology. It is intended to encourage cosmologists to rethink standard ideas in their field, leading to a broader concept of self-organization and of science itself. It is argued, from a cognitive epistemology perspective, that a first-order approach is inadequate for cosmology; study of the universe as a whole must include study of the scientific observer and the process of theorizing. Otherwise, concepts of self-organization at the cosmological scale remain constrained by (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Sansonthi Bunyōthayān (2006). Suriyapatithin Phan Pī: Prāsāt Phūphēk, Sakon Nakhō̜n. Samnakphim Naiyanā Praphai.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Lawrence Cahoone (2009). Arguments From Nothing: God and Quantum Cosmology. Zygon 44 (4):777-796.
    This essay explores a simple argument for a Ground of Being, objections to it, and limitations on it. It is nonsensical to refer to Nothing in the sense of utter absence, hence nothing can be claimed to come from Nothing. If, as it seems, the universe, or any physical ensemble containing it, is past-finite, it must be caused by an uncaused Ground. Speculative many-worlds, pocket universes and multiverses do not affect this argument, but the quantum cosmologies of Alex Vilenkin, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Roberto Campos-Navarro (2003). Central and Northern Mexico : Curanderos' Altar-Mesas in Mexico City. In Douglas Sharon & James Edward Brady (eds.), Mesas & Cosmologies in Mesoamerica. San Diego Museum of Man
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Alberto Cappi (2013). Cosmologia standard e oltre. In Isabella Tassani (ed.), Oltre la fisica normale. Interpretazioni alternative e teorie non standard nella fisica moderna. © ISONOMIA – Epistemologica, University of Urbino 96-115.
    Nel corso della seconda metà del XX secolo si è progressivamente svilppata ed affermata una cosmologia “standard”: vedremo in che cosa consiste e come si è costituita. Vedremo anche quali sono i suoi limiti e quali nuove teorie si candidano per superarli. Vorrei comunque chiarire subito che la cosmologia standard, per quanto possano sembrare sorprendenti i suoi risultati (qualche specialista parla di preposterous universe, ovvero di un assurdo universo), si fonda su esperimenti ed osservazioni, ed avrebbe potuto essere falsificata tante (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Allen J. Christenson (2003). Manipulating the Cosmos : Shamanic Tables Among the Highland Maya. In Douglas Sharon & James Edward Brady (eds.), Mesas & Cosmologies in Mesoamerica. San Diego Museum of Man 93--104.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Milan M. Ćirković (2002). Is the Universe Really That Simple? Foundations of Physics 32 (7):1141-1157.
    The intriguing recent suggestion of Tegmark that the universe—contrary to all our experiences and expectations—contains only a small amount of information due to an extremely high degree of internal symmetry is critically examined. It is shown that there are several physical processes, notably Hawking evaporation of black holes and non-zero decoherence time effects described by Plaga, as well as thought experiments of Deutsch and Tegmark himself, which can be construed as arguments against the low-information universe hypothesis. Some ramifications for both (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. C. J. S. Clarke (1974). Quantum Theory and Cosmolog. Philosophy of Science 41 (4):317-332.
    Interpretations, or generalizations, of quantum theory that are applicable to cosmology are of interest because they must display and resolve the "paradoxes" directly. The Everett interpretation is reexamined and compared with two alternatives. Its "metaphysical" connotations can be removed, after which it is found to be more acceptable than a theory which incorporates collapse, while retaining some unsatisfactory features.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Dirk L. Couprie (2011). Heaven and Earth in Ancient Greek Cosmology: From Thales to Heraclides Ponticus. Springer.
    Exploring the decisive steps taken by Anaximander of Miletus, this book details the transition from the archaic cosmological world-picture of a flat earth with a celestial vault to the Western world-picture of a free floating earth in an ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. William Lane Craig (1997). Hartle-Hawking Cosmology and Atheism. Analysis 57 (4):291 - 295.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. William Lane Craig (1993). Theism, Atheism, and Big Bang Cosmology. Oxford University Press.
    Contemporary science presents us with the remarkable theory that the universe began to exist about fifteen billion years ago with a cataclysmic explosion called "the Big Bang." The question of whether Big Bang cosmology supports theism or atheism has long been a matter of discussion among the general public and in popular science books, but has received scant attention from philosophers. This book sets out to fill this gap by means of a sustained debate between two philosophers, William Lane (...) and Quentin Smith, who defend opposing positions. Craig argues that the Big Bang that began the universe was created by God, while Smith argues that the Big Bang has no cause. Alternating chapters by the two philosophers criticize and attempt to refute preceding arguments. Their arguments are based on Einstein's theory of relativity and include a discussion of the new quantum cosmology recently developed by Stephen Hawking and popularized in A Brief History of Time. (shrink)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  32. Tim Crowther, On Describing the Total Universe as the Non-Self-Similar Fractal (NSSF) Set.
    One conceptual question has been puzzling people for a long time: As the observable universe has been expanding, what has it been expanding into and where did it come from? In this essay I will combine the two questions above to one: What is the Total Universe? I will begin attempt to develop such a description by examining the linguistic human limitations because I believe that this language barrier between our evolved language and a description of the total universe can (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Robert J. Deltete (2010). Entropic Creation: Religious Contexts of Thermodynamics and Cosmology. By Helge S. Kragh. Zygon 45 (1):281-282.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Robert J. Deltete & Reed A. Guy (1996). Emerging From Imaginary Time. Synthese 108 (2):185 - 203.
    Recent models in quantum cosmology make use of the concept of imaginary time. These models all conjecture a join between regions of imaginary time and regions of real time. We examine the model of James Hartle and Stephen Hawking to argue that the various no-boundary attempts to interpret the transition from imaginary to real time in a logically consistent and physically significant way all fail. We believe this conclusion also applies to quantum tunneling models, such (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35. James W. Dow (2003). Sierra Otomí Religious Symbolism : Mankind Responding to the Natural World. In Douglas Sharon & James Edward Brady (eds.), Mesas & Cosmologies in Mesoamerica. San Diego Museum of Man
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. W. B. Drees (1990). Philosophical Elements in Penrose's and Hawking's Research in Contemporary Cosmology. Philosophy 4:13.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Willem B. Drees (1991). Quantum Cosmologies and the "Beginning". Zygon 26 (3):373-396.
  38. Alfred Driessen (1997). The Question of the Existence of God in the Book of Stephen Hawking: A Brief History of Time. In Alfred Driessen & Antoine Suarez (eds.), Mathematical undecidability, quantum nonlocality, and the question of the existence of God. Springer
    The continuing interest in the book of S. Hawking "A Brief History of Time" makes a philosophical evaluation of the content highly desirable. As will be shown, the genre of this work can be identified as a speciality in philosophy, namely the proof of the existence of God. In this study an attempt is given to unveil the philosophical concepts and steps that lead to the final conclusions, without discussing in detail the remarkable review of modern physical theories. In order (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Alfred Driessen (1997). The Question of the Existence of God in the Book of Stephen Hawking: A Brief History of Time. In Alfred Driessen & Antoine Suarez (eds.), Mathematical undecidability, quantum nonlocality, and the question of the existence of God. Springer
    The continuing interest in the book of S. Hawking "A Brief History of Time" makes a philosophical evaluation of the content highly desirable. As will be shown, the genre of this work can be identified as a speciality in philosophy, namely the proof of the existence of God. In this study an attempt is given to unveil the philosophical concepts and steps that lead to the final conclusions, without discussing in detail the remarkable review of modern physical theories. In order (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Pierre Maurice Marie Duhem (1985). Medieval Cosmology: Theories of Infinity, Place, Time, Void, and the Plurality of Worlds. University of Chicago Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  41. Evelyn Edson (2004). Medieval Views of the Cosmos. Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.
    Once upon a time, the universe was much simpler: before our modern understanding of an infinite formless space scattered with pulsating stars, revolving planets, and mysterious black holes, the universe was seen as a rigid hierarchical system with the earth and the human race at its center. Medieval Views of the Cosmos investigates this worldview shared by medieval societies, revealing how their modes of thought affect us even today. In the medieval world system--inherited by Christians and Muslims from the Greeks (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. George Francis Rayner Ellis (2014). On the Philosophy of Cosmology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 46 (1):5-23.
    This paper gives an overview of significant issues in the philosophy of cosmology, starting off by emphasizing the uniqueness of the universe and the way models are used in description and explanation. It then considers, basic limits on observations; the need to test alternatives; ways to test consistency; and implications of the uniqueness of the universe as regards distinguishing laws of physics from contingent conditions. It goes on to look at the idea of a multiverse as a scientific explanation of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. François Elmir (2005). Science Et Technique : Études d'Histoire Et D'Épistémologie. Siress.
    -- t. 2. Origines médiévales de la science.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Lz Fang (1988). Philosophical Problems of Modern Cosmology. Chinese Studies in Philosophy 19 (4):55-64.
    Cosmology is a field riddled with controversy. With regard to cosmology itself, there are several different schools of thought. Some think that there is basically no such thing as scientific cosmology, and that cosmology is just a pseudoscience. Or as the French physicist Brillouin put it, cosmology is "pure fantasy." A second school says that the value of cosmology is undeniable. Astronomical observations and measurements have already encountered large-scale problems, and these problems have an objective existence; they are not fabricated. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Jan Faye, Identity, Space-Time, and Cosmology.
    Modern cosmology treats space and time, or rather space-time, as concrete particulars. The General Theory of Relativity combines the distribution of matter and energy with the curvature of space-time. Here space-time appears as a concrete entity which affects matter and energy and is affected by the things in it. I question the idea that space-time is a concrete existing entity which both substantivalism and reductive relationism maintain. Instead I propose an alternative view, which may be called non-reductive relationism, by arguing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Harvie Ferguson (1990). The Science of Pleasure: Cosmos and Psyche in the Bourgeois World View. Routledge.
    Examines the formation, structure and collapse of the bourgeois world view, exploring the concepts of fun, happiness, pleasure, and excitement.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47. Dominik Filipp, External Cause of the Universe.
    The article explains how the primordial singularity can be understood as a cause having brought the Universe into empirical existence. It also addresses the nonempirical nature of such a cause.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. David Finkelstein (1982). Cosmological Choices. Synthese 50 (3):399 - 420.
    Present physics is a mix of theories of time, logic, and matter. These may have a common origin in a unitary quantum cosmology founded on process alone. A quantum theory of sets, or something like it, is helpful for such a cosmology, and one is constructed by adding superposition to a slightly reformulated classical set theory. There is an elementary or atomic process in such theories. The size of its characteristic time is estimated from the mass spectrum, although this gives (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Leo Albert Foley (1962). Cosmology, Philosophical and Scientific. Milwaukee, Bruce Pub. Co..
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. David J. Furley (1987). The Greek Cosmologists. Cambridge University Press.
    Furley's study presents a clear picture of the opposing views of the natural world and its contents as seen by philosophers and scientists in classical antiquity. On one side were the materialists whose world was mechanistic, evolutionary, and unbounded, lacking the focus of a natural center. The other side included teleologists, whose world was purposive, non-evolutionary, finite, and centrifocal. This volume takes the reader up to the criticisms of Plato and Aristotle. The second volume will examine Plato and Aristotle's own (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 164