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  1. A. S. Akat (2013). On Economics and Social Sciences An Agenda for Dialogue. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (4-5):385-394.
    The global economic crisis makes closer collaboration between economics and other social sciences even more urgent. One major cause of divergence has been the attitudes of the parties towards the ‘market’. Yet, the market economy, in all its diversity, is one of the immutable facts of modern life. Understanding the causes of its survival will improve the dialogue. Another interesting puzzle is the lack of credible alternatives to it despite the depth of the crisis. The experience of the economists in (...)
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  2. J. McKenzie Alexander (2006). The Stag Hunt and the Evolution of Social Structure, Brian Skyrms. Cambridge University Press, 2004, 149 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 22 (3):441-448.
  3. Thomas Basbøll (2006). Reflexivity in Perspective: A Note on Davis and Klaes' Reading ofLas Meninas. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (1):113-119.
  4. Gregor Betz (2008). Der Umgang mit Zukunftswissen in der Klimapolitikberatung. Eine Fallstudie zum Stern Review. Philosophia Naturalis 45 (1):95-129.
    The Stern Review on The Economics of Climate Change is a highly influential welfare analysis of climate policy measures which has been published in 2006. This paper identifies and systematically assesses the long-term socioeconomic and climatic predictions the Stern Review relies on, and reflects them philosophically. Being a cost-benefit analysis, the Stern Review has to predict the benefits of climate mitigation policies, i.e.the damaging consequences of climate change which might be avoided, as well as the costs of implementing such policies. (...)
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  5. Cristina Bicchieri & Ryan Muldoon, Social Norms.
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  6. Mark Blaug & Kevin D. Hoover (1996). Statement. Journal of Economic Methodology 3 (2):349-350.
  7. Lawrence A. Boland (2006). On Reviewing Machine Dreams : Zoomed-in Versus Zoomed-Out. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (4):480-495.
    continues to receive many reviews. Judging by recent reviews, this is a very controversial book. The question considered here is, how can one fairly review a controversial book—particularly when the book is widely popular and, for a history of economic thought book, a best seller? This essay uses Mirowski’s book as a case study to propose one answer for this question. In the process, it will examine how others seem to have answered this question. Key Words: methodology • reviews • (...)
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  8. Lawrence A. Boland (2001). Towards a Useful Methodology Discipline. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):3-10.
  9. G. Brennan (2010). PPE: An Institutional View. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 9 (4):379-397.
    One way of responding to the question of what PPE is involves mobilizing the tools that PPE involves. That is the exercise attempted in this article. The object is to use PPE as a method to analyze PPE as a subject matter. PPE is, whatever else, an interdisciplinary enterprise; so the point of departure involves analyzing the role and properties of disciplines within the institutional organization of enquiry. The basic idea is that enquiry is governed by a ‘division of epistemic (...)
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  10. G. Brennan, A. Hamlin & H. Kliemt (2010). PPE: An Appraisal. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 9 (4):363-365.
  11. Hubertus Busche (ed.) (2011). Philosophische Aspekte der Ökonomie. Königshausen & Neumann.
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  12. Gustavo Cevolani (2011). Hayek in the Lab. Austrian School, Game Theory, and Experimental Economics. Logic and Philosophy of Science 9 (1):429-436.
    Focusing on the work of Friedrich von Hayek and Vernon Smith, we discuss some conceptual links between Austrian economics and recent work in behavioral game theory and experimental economics. After a brief survey of the main methodological aspects of Austrian and experimental economics, we suggest that common views on subjectivism, individualism, and the role of qualitative explanations and predictions in social science may favour a fruitful interaction between these two research programs.
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  13. Christine Clavien & Michel Chapuisat (2013). Altruism Across Disciplines: One Word, Multiple Meanings. Biology and Philosophy 28 (1):125-140.
    Altruism is a deep and complex phenomenon that is analysed by scholars of various disciplines, including psychology, philosophy, biology, evolutionary anthropology and experimental economics. Much confusion arises in current literature because the term altruism covers variable concepts and processes across disciplines. Here we investigate the sense given to altruism when used in different fields and argumentative contexts. We argue that four distinct but related concepts need to be distinguished: (a) psychological altruism , the genuine motivation to improve others’ interests and (...)
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  14. Rosa Cobo Bedía (2011). Hacia Una Nueva Política Sexual: Las Mujeres Ante la Reacción Patriarcal. Catarata.
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  15. David Colander (2013). The Systemic Failure of Economic Methodologists. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (1):56 - 68.
    (2013). The systemic failure of economic methodologists. Journal of Economic Methodology: Vol. 20, Methodology, Systemic Risk, and the Economics Profession, pp. 56-68. doi: 10.1080/1350178X.2013.774848.
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  16. David Colander (1994). Vision, Judgment, and Disagreement Among Economists. Journal of Economic Methodology 1 (1):43-56.
  17. Diane Coyle (2012). The Paradox of Popularity in Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (3):187-192.
    This special issue collects papers presented at the EIPE Conference ?Economics Made Fun in the Face of the Economic Crisis? held on 10?11 December 2010 in Rotterdam. The central theme of the conference was the tension between the bold claim in Economics Made Fun books that economics can explain the hidden side of everything and the apparent failure of economics to foresee, let alone prevent the financial crisis. Economics is understandably unpopular as a subject because of the financial crisis, and (...)
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  18. John B. Davis (2011). Identity Economics: How Our Identities Shape Our Work, Wages, and Well-Being, George A. Akerlof and Rachel E. Kranton, Princeton University Press, Vi + 185 Pp. Economics and Philosophy 27 (03):331-338.
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  19. John Davis & Matthias Klaes (2006). Imprecise Precision: Rejoinder to Basbøll. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (1):121-123.
  20. Erwin Dekker & Paul Teule (2012). Economics Made Fun, and Made Fun Of: How 'Fun' Redefines the Domain and Identity of the Economics Profession. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (4):427-437.
    This paper compares two aspects of the use of ?fun? within the economics profession. It analyzes the way in which a recently emerged genre of economics-made-fun uses fun and surprising insights to reach new audiences. And it also analyzes the way in which humor is used within and from outside the economics profession to criticize certain practices and characteristics of economists. It argues that the economics-made-fun genre, ?Freakonomics? being the prime example, not only redefines the domain of economics, as is (...)
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  21. Douglas den Uyl (2005). Review of Samuel Fleischacker: On Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations: A Philosophical Companion. [REVIEW] Journal of Scottish Philosophy 3 (2):171-180.
  22. Sheila C. Dow (2003). Introduction. Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (3):283-283.
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  23. Brian Epstein (2014). Why Macroeconomics Does Not Supervene on Microeconomics. Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (1):3-18.
    In recent years, the project of providing microeconomic foundations for macroeconomics has taken on new urgency. Some philosophers and economists have challenged the project, both for the way economists actually approach microfoundations and for more general anti-reductionist reasons. Reductionists and anti-reductionists alike, however, have taken it to be trivial that the macroeconomic facts are exhaustively determined by microeconomic ones. In this paper, I challenge this supposed triviality. I argue that macroeconomic properties do not even globally supervene on microeconomic ones. This (...)
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  24. Ben Fine & Dimitris Milonakis (2012). From Freakonomics to Political Economy. Historical Materialism 20 (3):81-96.
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  25. Samuel Fleischacker (2004). On Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations: A Philosophical Companion. Princeton University Press.
    Adam Smith was a philosopher before he ever wrote about economics, yet until now there has never been a philosophical commentary on the Wealth of Nations . Samuel Fleischacker suggests that Smith's vastly influential treatise on economics can be better understood if placed in the light of his epistemology, philosophy of science, and moral theory. He lays out the relevance of these aspects of Smith's thought to specific themes in the Wealth of Nations , arguing, among other things, that Smith (...)
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  26. Robert H. Frank (2012). A Less-is-More Approach to Introductory Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (3):193-198.
    Studies have shown that when students are tested about their knowledge of basic economic principles six months after completing an introductory economics course, they score no better, on average, than those who never took the course. That remarkable failure is explained in part by the fact that many professors try to teach their students far too much, and in part because many employ excessive mathematical formalism. This paper describes an alternative approach inspired by evidence that the human brain absorbs new (...)
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  27. Danny Frederick (2013). Popper, Rationality and the Possibility of Social Science. THEORIA 28 (1):61-75.
    Social science employs teleological explanations which depend upon the rationality principle, according to which people exhibit instrumental rationality. Popper points out that people also exhibit critical rationality, the tendency to stand back from, and to question or criticise, their views. I explain how our critical rationality impugns the explanatory value of the rationality principle and thereby threatens the very possibility of social science. I discuss the relationship between instrumental and critical rationality and show how we can reconcile our critical rationality (...)
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  28. Igorʹ Galeev (2007). Filosofsko-Ėkonomicheskie Ocherki. Teis.
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  29. Daniel Gay (2007). Modernism, Reflexivity and the Washington Consensus. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (1):83-105.
    This paper develops a taxonomy of reflexive development practice, suggesting an examination of external values and norms; an assessment of the importance of local context; a recognition that policies can worsen the problems that they try to solve; and the idea that theory and policy should be revised as circumstances change. The taxonomy is developed as a way of addressing the difficulties encountered by the modernist Washington Consensus on the one hand and postmodernism on the other. The discussion draws on (...)
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  30. Ernest Gellner (1979). Spectacles & Predicaments: Essays in Social Theory. Cambridge University Press.
  31. Tal Gilead (2013). Educational Insights of the Economist: Tibor Scitovsky on Education, Production and Creative Consumption. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (6):623-639.
  32. Robert S. Goldfarb (1995). The Economist-as-Audience Needs a Methodology of Plausible Inference. Journal of Economic Methodology 2 (2):201-222.
    Economists often try to make plausible inferences from a sizable empirical literature addressing a particular measurement, direction-of-effect, or testing issue. There are serious methodological problems associated with drawing such inferences. This article sets out some of these problems in order to make a case for their importance. After discussing these problems, the paper presents three case study examples of inference difficulties in specific literatures. It then proposes a new hypothesis about the time pattern of publication bias in empirical economics literatures. (...)
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  33. Craufurd D. Goodwin (2009). Economics Meets Esthetics in the Bloomsbury Group. In Jack Amariglio, Joseph W. Childers & Stephen Cullenberg (eds.), Sublime Economy: On the Intersection of Art and Economics. Routledge.
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  34. Jean-Joseph Goux (1990). Symbolic Economies: After Marx and Freud. Cornell University Press.
    Looking closely at the work of such major figures as Lacan, Derrida, and Nietzsche, Goux extends the implications of Marxism and Freudianism to an interdisciplinary semiotics of value and proposes a radical concept of exchange.
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  35. Pierluigi M. Grasselli & Marco Moschini (eds.) (2007). Economia E Persona. V&P.
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  36. Waldemar Grzywacz (2005). Ekonomiści I Systemy Ekonomiczne. Polskie Tow. Ekonomiczne, Oddz. Wojewódzki W Szczecinie.
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  37. Nicole Haasoun (2013). Human Rights and the Minimally Good Life. Res Philosophica 90 (3):413-438.
    All people have human rights and, intuitively, there is a close connection between human rights, needs, and autonomy. The two main theories about the nature and value of human rights often fail to account for this connection. Interest theories, on which rights protect individuals’ important interests, usually fail to capture the close relationship between human rights and autonomy; autonomy is not constitutive of the interests human rights protect. Will theories, on which human rights protect individuals’ autonomy, cannot explain why the (...)
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  38. John A. Hall (1999). The Sociological Deficit of the Open Society, Analyzed and Remedied. In I. C. Jarvie & Sandra Pralong (eds.), Popper's Open Society After Fifty Years: The Continuing Relevance of Karl Popper. Routledge.
  39. D. Wade Hands (2009). Introduction. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (3):287-291.
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  40. D. Wade Hands (1992). Economics and the Philosophy of Science, Deborah A. Redman. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991, Vii + 252 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 8 (02):298-303.
  41. D. Wade Hands (1987). Human Agency and Language: Philosophical Papers I, Charles Taylor, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985, 294 Pages.Philosophy and the Human Sciences: Philosophical Papers II, Charles Taylor, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985, 337 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 3 (01):172-.
  42. Nicole Hassoun (forthcoming). An Aspect of Variable Population Comparisons: Does Adding a Rich Person to a Population Reduce Poverty? Economics and Philosophy.
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  43. Nicole Hassoun (forthcoming). Global Justice in a Globalizing World. New Waves in Ethics.
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  44. Nicole Hassoun (2012). Globalization and Culture. Culture and Dialogue 2 (2):73-98.
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  45. Nicole Hassoun (2010). Making the Case for Foreign Aid. Public Affairs Quarterly 24 (1):1-20.
    This paper addresses an important methodological question for a recent debate in global justice: What types of data are necessary for settling normative debates about foreign aid? Recently, several philosophers have considered the case for foreign aid and have concluded that foreign aid is either ineffective or counter-productive. This paper considers what kinds of evidence those doing applied philosophy must use to support different claims about aid’s efficacy. Then, using some of the best available data, this paper makes a strong (...)
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  46. Nicole Hassoun (2008). Coercion, Legitimacy, and Individual Freedom: A Reply to Sondernholm. American Philosophical Quarterly 45 (2):191-198.
    In “World Poverty and Individual Freedom” (WPIF) I argue that the global order – because it is coercive – is obligated to do what it can to ensure that its subjects are capable of autonomously agreeing to its rule. This requires helping them meet their basic needs. In “World Poverty and Not Respecting Individual Freedom Enough” Jorn Sonderholm asserts that this argument is invalid and unsound, in part, because it is too demanding. This article explains why Sonderholm’s critique is mistaken (...)
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  47. Nicole Hassoun & Uriah Kriegel (2008). The Moral Permissibility of Infanticide. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):45-55.
    In this paper, we present a conditional argument for the moral permissibility of some kinds of infanticide. The argument is based on a certain view of consciousness and the claim that there is an intimate connection between consciousness and infanticide. In bare outline, the argument is this: it is impermissible to intentionally kill a creature only if the creature is conscious; it is reasonable to believe that there is some time at which human infants are not conscious; therefore, it is (...)
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  48. Nicole Hassoun & S. Subramanian (2012). Variable Population Poverty Comparisons. Journal of Development Economics 98 (2):238-241.
    This paper demonstrates that the property of Replication Invariance, generally considered to be an innocuous requirement for the extension of fixed-population poverty comparisons to variable-population contexts, is incompatible with other plausible variable- and fixed-population axioms. This fact raises questions about what constitutes an appropriate headcount assessment of poverty, in terms of whether one should focus on the proportion, or the absolute numbers, of the population in poverty. This observation, in turn, has important implications for tracking poverty and setting targets for (...)
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  49. Nicole Hassoun & D. Wong (forthcoming). Conserving Nature: Preserving Identity. Journal of Chinese Philosophy.
    Fundamental approaches to environmental ethics currently seem polarized between two broad varieties: the “conservationist” approach on which we should conserve the environment when it is in our interest to do so and the “preservationist” approach on which we should preserve the environment even when it is not in our interest to do so. The first approach obviously has a broader potential audience and is invoked even by preservationists when they seek to marshal the broadest possible support for environmental protection. For (...)
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  50. Axel Honneth & Marco Solinas (2010). Capitalismo e riconoscimento. Firenze University Press.
    Capitalismo e riconoscimento" presenta, in cinque saggi per la prima volta raccolti insieme e tradotti in italiano, una densa e pregnante analisi di taluni cruciali processi socio-strutturali, morali e normativi delle società capitalistiche contemporanee dalla prospettiva delle dinamiche del reciproco riconoscimento e del disrispetto concernenti la sfera del lavoro. Particolare attenzione è dedicata ai paradossali rovesciamenti delle istanze di autorealizzazione, autonomia e responsabilità personale registratisi negli ultimi decenni nel quadro di un mercato del lavoro sempre più deregolato.
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