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This subcategory holds work in the philosophy of film that does not clearly fall under any of the other categories. Much of what you will find here is continental philosophy of film.

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  1. Yvette Bíró (2005). Időformák: A Filmritmus Játéka. Osiris.
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  2. Noël Carroll (2008). The Philosophy of Motion Pictures. Blackwell Pub..
    Philosophy of Motion Pictures is a first-of-its-kind, bottom-up introduction to this bourgeoning field of study. Topics include film as art, medium specificity, defining motion pictures, representation, editing, narrative, emotion and evaluation. Clearly written and supported with a wealth of examples Explores characterizations of key elements of motion pictures –the shot, the sequence, the erotetic narrative, and its modes of affective address.
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  3. Noël Carroll (1996). Theorizing the Moving Image. Cambridge University Press.
    A selection of essays written by one of the leading critics of film over the last two decades, this volume examines theoretical aspects of film and television through penetrating analyses of such genres as soap opera, documentary, comedy, and such topics as 'sight gags', film metaphor, point-of-view editing, and movie music. Throughout, individual films are considered in depth. Carroll's essays, moreover, represent the cognitivist turn in film studies, containing in-depth criticism of existing approaches to film theory, and heralding a new (...)
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  4. Henri G. Colt, Silvia Quadrelli & Lester D. Friedman (eds.) (2011). The Picture of Health: Medical Ethics and the Movies. Oxford University Press.
    This volume presents a collection of about 80 very brief, accessible essays written by international experts from medicine, social sciences, and the humanities, ...
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  5. Umberto Curi (2006). Un Filosofo Al Cinema. Tascabili Bompiani.
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  6. Angela Curran (2008). Brecht. In Paisley Livingston & Carl Plantinga (eds.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Film. Routledge.
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  7. Angela Curran (2008). Gender. In Paisley Livingston & Carl Plantinga (eds.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Film. Routledge.
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  8. Angela Curran (2007). Shadow of a Doubt: Secrets, Lies, and the Search for the Truth. In David Baggett & William Drummin (eds.), Hitchcock and Philosophy: Dial M for Metaphysic.
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  9. Gregory Currie (1995). Image and Mind: Film, Philosophy and Cognitive Science. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about the nature of film: about the nature of moving images, about the viewer's relation to film, and about the kinds of narrative that film is capable of presenting. It represents a very decisive break with the semiotic and psychoanalytic theories of film which have dominated discussion over the last twenty years. The central thesis is that film is essentially a pictorial medium and that the movement of film images is real rather than illusory. A general (...)
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  10. Arnold Cusmariu, The Perils of Aphrodite.
    Cinema is an effective medium for communicating the Platonist attitude toward Beauty as an attribute worthy of moral respect, as case studies can illustrate. Mine focuses on the work of the French actress Carole Bouquet, who launched her career in Buñuel’s Cet obscur objet du désir (That Obscure Object of Desire). Part 1 shows sins against Beauty to be a unifying theme of Bouquet’s films, which leave no doubt as to the appropriate response. Part 2 combines Plato’s distinction in the (...)
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  11. Jean-Louis Déotte (ed.) (2011). Philosophie Et Cinéma. L'harmattan.
    En l'occurrence, au XXe siècle, le cinéma, alors que le XIXe était appareillé par la photographie. Dans une radicale philosophie de la temporalité comme la sienne, les appareils font chacun leur tour époque sans pourtant s'éliminer.
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  12. Joerg Fingerhut, Sabine Flach & Jan Söffner (2011). Synaesthesia and Kinaesthetics. Peter Lang.
    A myriad of sensations inform and direct us when we engage with the environment. To understand their influence on the development of our habitus it is important to focus on unifying processes in sensing. This approach allows us to include phenomena that elude a rather narrow view that focuses on each of the five discrete senses in isolation. One of the central questions addressed in this volume is whether there is something like a sensual habitus, and if there is, how (...)
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  13. Anne Friedberg (2010). The End of Cinema : Multimedia and Technological Change. In Marc Furstenau (ed.), The Film Theory Reader: Debates and Arguments. Routledge.
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  14. Rosalind Galt (2011). Doing Away with Words : Synaesthetic Dislocations in Okinawa and Hong Kong. In John David Rhodes & Elena Gorfinkel (eds.), Taking Place: Location and the Moving Image. University of Minnesota Press.
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  15. Berys Gaut (2010). A Philosophy of Cinematic Art. Cambridge.
    A wide-ranging and accessible study of cinema as an art form, discussing traditional photographic films, digital cinema, and videogames.
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  16. Eddie George & Anna Piva (2012). Dis-)Continuities of the Cinematic Imaginary: (Non-)Representation, Discourse and Theory. Imagi[Ni]Ng the Universe: Cosmos, Otherness and Cinema. In Saër Maty Bâ & Will Higbee (eds.), De-Westernizing Film Studies. Routledge.
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  17. Christopher Grau, Happy-Go-Lucky Revisited.
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  18. Andrew Kania (2009). The Philosophy of Motion Pictures • by Noël Carroll. Analysis 69 (1):194-195.
    Book review of _The Philosophy of Motion Pictures_ by Noël Carroll.
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  19. Paisley Livingston & Carl R. Plantinga (eds.) (2008). The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film. Routledge.
    The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film is the first comprehensive volume to explore the main themes, topics, thinkers and issues in philosophy and film.
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  20. Scott A. Lukas & John Marmysz (eds.) (2009). Fear, Cultural Anxiety, and Transformation: Horror, Science Fiction, and Fantasy Films Remade. Lexington Books.
    This collection was inspired by the observation that film remakes offer us the opportunity to revisit important issues, stories, themes, and topics in a manner that is especially relevant and meaningful to contemporary audiences. Like mythic stories that are told again and again in differing ways, film remakes present us with updated perspectives on timeless ideas. While some remakes succeed and others fail aesthetically, they always say something about the culture in which_and for which_they are produced. Contributors explore the ways (...)
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  21. Christy Mag Uidhir (2011). An Eliminativist Theory of Suspense. Philosophy and Literature 35 (1):121-133.
    Motivating philosophical interest in the notion of suspense requires comparatively little appeal to what goes on in our ordinary work-a-day lives. After all, with respect to our everyday engagements with the actual world suspense appears to be largely absent—most of us seem to lead lives relatively suspense-free. The notion of suspense strikes us as interesting largely because of its significance with respect to our engagements with (largely fictional) narratives. So, when I indicate a preference for suspense novels, I indicate a (...)
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  22. John Marmysz (2013). The Lure of the Mob: Contemporary Cinematic Depictions of Skinhead Authenticity. Journal of Popular Culture 46 (3):626-646.
    In this paper I examine the history and style of the real-life skinhead subculture in order to clarify its nature and to highlight its preoccupation with the ideal of "authenticity." I then use the insights thus gained in order to understand why it is that the skinhead characters in such fictional films as Romper Stomper, American History X and The Believer are, despite their neo-Nazism, granted a sympathetic depiction.
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  23. John Marmysz (2011). Review of Scotland: Global Cinema: Genres, Modes and Identities. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 15 (2):159-165.
    A review of Scotland: Global Cinema, by David Martin-Jones.
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  24. John Marmysz (2004). Cultural Change and Nihilism in the Rollerball Films. Film and Philosophy 8:91-111.
    In 2002, a remake of the 1975 film Rollerball was released in theaters. It flopped at the box-office, disappearing quickly from movie screens and reappearing shortly thereafter on home video. While aesthetically horrendous, the remake of Rollerball is instructive, as it provides a point of contrast to the original film, highlighting a change in our culture’s manner of engagement with the difficult philosophical problem of nihilism. Both films share a roughly similar plot, yet in the differing manners that they explore (...)
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  25. John Marmysz (2002). The Cutting Edge Between Trash Cinema and High Art. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 6 (8).
    A review of Joan Hawkins' Cutting Edge: Art-Horror and the Horrific Avant-gard.
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  26. Daniel Moseley (2012). Self-Creation, Identity and Authenticity: A Study of "A History of Violence" and "Eastern Promises&Quot;. In Simon Riches (ed.), The Philosophy of David Cronenberg. University Press of Kentucky.
    This essay explores philosophical questions about practical identity that emerge in David Cronenberg's films, "A History of Violence" and "Eastern Promises." I distinguish the metaphysical problems of personal identity from the practical problems and contend that the latter are of central importance to the topic of authenticity. Central scenes from both films are examined with an eye to their engagement with the issues of authenticity and self-creation.
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  27. Alison Niemi (2003). Film as Religious Experience: Myths and Models in Mass Entertainment. Critical Review 15 (3-4):435-446.
    Abstract Popular film has become a significant venue for meaning?making in modern society. Like religion, film provides models for understanding and behaving within the social world. Like religion, film reinforces this content through emotional resonance. Myths slip under a viewer's intellectual defenses in the non?threatening guise of entertainment. In a mainstream culture skeptical of religion, film presents an alternative mechanism for the transmission and processing of ?religious? ideas and ideals.
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  28. Pyŏng-ch'ŏl Pak (2009). Saenggak Ŭi Ch'ang, K'ino Ai: Yŏnghwa Sok Ŭi Ch'ŏrhak Ii. Sŏgwangsa.
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  29. Pyŏng-ch'ŏl Pak (2001). Yŏnghwa Sok Ŭi Ch'ŏrhak. Sŏgwangsa.
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  30. Carl Plantinga (2009). Rethinking Affects, Narration, Fantasy, and Realism. Rethinking Affects, Narration, Fantasy, and Realism. Trauma, Pleasure, and Emotion in the Viewing of Titanic: A Cognitive Approach. In Warren Buckland (ed.), Film Theory & Contemporary Hollywood Movies. Routledge.
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  31. Susannah Radstone (2007). The Sexual Politics of Time: Confession, Nostalgia, Memory. Routledge.
    The Sexual Politics of Time will be of interest tostudents and researchers of time, memory, difference and cultural change, in subjects such as Media and ...
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  32. Juneko Robinson (2010). Review: Nightmare Japan: Contemporary Japanese Horror Cinema. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 14 (1):350-360.
    A review of Nightmare Japan, by Jay McRoy.
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  33. Aaron Smuts (forthcoming). Philosophy of Film: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.
    Philosophy of Film: A Contemporary Introduction (Routledge) provides a critical overview of the literature on eleven different issues in the philosophy of film, from "What is Film?" to "Can Film Do Philosophy?" It aims to provide an objective overview of the principal arguments on each side of the issues. The set of issues includes all of the most important topics as well as some that are less well represented in the discipline, such as whether the power of cinema derives from (...)
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  34. Aaron Smuts (2010). 'Pickman's Model': Horror and the Objective Purport of Photographs. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 4:487-509.
    It is commonly held, even among non-Bazinians, that photographs are typically perceived as more objective than other forms of depiction. The implications of this putative feature of photographic reception for the fiction film have been relatively ignored. If photos do have an objective purport, it would explain the power of a common device used in horror movies where a monster is selectively revealed through a degraded image, usually an amateur video recording. However, I argue that a better explanation is forthcoming. (...)
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  35. Aaron Smuts (2009). Film as Philosophy: In Defense of a Bold Thesis. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (3):409-420.
    I argue for a position close to what Paisley Livingston calls the bold thesis of cinema as philosophy. The bold thesis I defend is that films can make innovative, independent philosophical contributions by paradigmatic cinematic means. I clarify the thesis before presenting what Livingston thinks is a fatal problem for any similar position—the problem of paraphrase. As an example in defense of the bold thesis, I offer the "For God and Country" sequence in Sergei Eisenstein’s October (1928). I argue that (...)
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  36. Aaron Smuts (2009). The Paradox of Suspense. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 2009 (6.1):1-15.
    The ultimate success of Hollywood blockbusters is dependent upon repeat viewings. Fans return to theaters to see films multiple times and buy DVDs so they can watch movies yet again. Although it is something of a received dogma in philosophy and psychology that suspense requires uncertainty, many of the biggest box office successes are action movies that fans claim to find suspenseful on repeated viewings. The conflict between the theory of suspense and the accounts of viewers generates a problem known (...)
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  37. Aaron Smuts (2009). What is Interactivity? Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (4):pp. 53-73.
    I argue that the term "interactive" should be considered a general-purpose term that indicates something about whatever it is applied to, whether that is art, artifact, or nature. I base my definition in the notion of "interacting with" something. First, I look for essential features of this relation, and then using these features, I develop a notion of interactivity that can help distinguish the interactive from non-interactive arts. Although I am skeptical of the benefits interactivity affords, interactive artworks are significant (...)
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  38. Aaron Smuts (2005). Video Games and the Philosophy of Art. American Society for Aesthetics Newsletter.
    The most cursory look at video games raises several interesting issues that have yet to receive any consideration in the philosophy of art, such as: Are videogames art and, if so, what kind of art are they? Are they more closely related to film, or are they similar to performance arts, such as dance? Perhaps they are more akin to competitive sports and games like diving and chess? Can we even define “video game” or “game”? We often say that video (...)
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  39. Aaron Smuts (2005). Are Video Games Art? Contemporary Aesthetics 2.
    I argue that by any major definition of art many modern video games should be considered art. Rather than defining art and defending video games based on a single contentious definition, I offer reasons for thinking that video games can be art according to historical, aesthetic, institutional, representational and expressive theories of art. Overall, I argue that while many video games probably should not be considered art, there are good reasons to think that some video games should be classified as (...)
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  40. Aaron Smuts (2003). Film Theory Meets Video Games: An Analysis of the Issues and Methodologies in 'ScreenPlay'. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 7 (54).
    "ScreenPlay" is the first collection of essays devoted to exploring the relationship between cinema and video games. It attempts to introduce the field of video game studies while also increasing our understanding of the two artforms. Although not all of the essays are models of clear thinking on the subject, the volume will be a valuable resource for those working in film, philosophy, new media, and video game studies. Geoff King and Tanya Krzywinska have brought together a diverse collection of (...)
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  41. Aaron Smuts & Jonathan Frome (2004). Helpless Spectators: Suspense in Videogames and Film. Text Technology 1 (1):13-34.
    The most surprising conclusion of our analysis is that videogames can be most effective in generating suspense not by highlighting their unique ability to be interactive, but, to the contrary, limiting interactivity at key points, thereby turning players into helpless spectators like those that watch films. Discovering this technique in video games allows us to turn our attention back to film, where we are able to highlight a previously ignored feature of viewer film interaction, namely, helplessness.
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  42. F. E. Sparshott (1971). Vision and Dream in the Cinema. Philosophical Exchange.
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  43. T. Minh-Ha Trinh (1991). When the Moon Waxes Red: Representation, Gender, and Cultural Politics. Routledge.
    In this collection of her provocative essays on Third World art and culture, award-winning filmmaker and theorist Trinh Minh-ha offers new challenges to Western regimes of knowledge. Bringing to her subjects an acute sense of the many meanings of the marginal, Trinh examines Asian and African texts, the theories of Barthes, questions of spectatorship, the enigmas of art, and the perils of anthropology. In one essay, taking off from ideas raised earlier by Zora Neale Hurston, Trinh considers with astonishment the (...)
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  44. Dario Viganò (2007). L'adesso Del Domani: Rifigurazioni Della Speranza Nel Cinema Moderno E Contemporaneo. Effatà.
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  45. Saša Vojković (2009). Feminism, Philosophy, and Queer Theory. Reformulating the Symbolic Universe: Kill Bill and Tarantino's Transcultural Imaginary. In Warren Buckland (ed.), Film Theory & Contemporary Hollywood Movies. Routledge.
  46. Kendall Walton (1984). Transparent Pictures: On the Nature of Photographic Realism. Critical Inquiry 18 (1):67 - 72.
  47. Thomas E. Wartenberg (2008). Review of Irving Singer, Ingmar Bergman, Cinematic Philosopher: Reflections on His Creativity. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).
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  48. Thomas E. Wartenberg (2003). Philosophy Screened: Experiencing the Matrix. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 27 (1):139–152.
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  49. Thomas E. Wartenberg (2002). Can Romance Function as Social Criticism? A Defense of Unlikely Couples. Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (2):310–321.
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  50. Jonathan Webber (2009). Reconstructing Alfie. The Philosophers' Magazine (47):61-66.
    Good stories tend to get told and retold, over and over again, mutating in the process. They adapt to different times and places, taking on and sloughing off embellishments as they are handed on. They persist through a kind of evolution. This is how it has always been and how it must be. Tales cannot survive otherwise. But this does not mean that all mutations are equally acceptable. For critical discussion is part of the environment in which stories survive. So (...)
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