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This subcategory holds work in the philosophy of film that does not clearly fall under any of the other categories. Much of what you will find here is continental philosophy of film.

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  1. Nathan Andersen (2014). Shadow Philosophy: Plato’s Cave and Cinema. Routledge.
    _Shadow Philosophy: Plato’s Cave and Cinema_ is an accessible and exciting new contribution to film-philosophy, which shows that to take film seriously is also to engage with the fundamental questions of philosophy. Nathan Andersen brings Stanley Kubrick’s film _A Clockwork Orange _into philosophical conversation with Plato’s _Republic_, comparing their contributions to themes such as the nature of experience and meaning, the character of justice, the contrast between appearance and reality, the importance of art, and the impact of images. At the (...)
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  2. David Baggett & William Drummin (eds.) (2007). Hitchcock and Philosophy: Dial M for Metaphysic. Open Court Publishing.
    - The gushing shower in the Bates motel suddenly becomes a shower of blood - The birds line up on the fence, watching and waiting - An airplane chases Cary Grant through a cornfield - James Stewart experiences vertigo in the church tower in ...
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  3. Yvette Bíró (2005). Időformák: A Filmritmus Játéka. Osiris.
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  4. Noël Carroll (2008). The Philosophy of Motion Pictures. Blackwell Pub..
    _Philosophy of Motion Pictures_ is a first-of-its-kind, bottom-up introduction to this bourgeoning field of study. Topics include film as art, medium specificity, defining motion pictures, representation, editing, narrative, emotion and evaluation. Clearly written and supported with a wealth of examples Explores characterizations of key elements of motion pictures –the shot, the sequence, the erotetic narrative, and its modes of affective address.
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  5. Noël Carroll (1996). Theorizing the Moving Image. Cambridge University Press.
    A selection of essays written by one of the leading critics of film over the last two decades, this volume examines theoretical aspects of film and television through penetrating analyses of such genres as soap opera, documentary, comedy, and such topics as 'sight gags', film metaphor, point-of-view editing, and movie music. Throughout, individual films are considered in depth. Carroll's essays, moreover, represent the cognitivist turn in film studies, containing in-depth criticism of existing approaches to film theory, and heralding a new (...)
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  6. Robert R. Clewis (2012). Film Evaluation and the Enjoyment of Dated Films. Projections: The Journal for Movies and Mind 6 (2):42-63.
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  7. Henri G. Colt, Silvia Quadrelli & Lester D. Friedman (eds.) (2011). The Picture of Health: Medical Ethics and the Movies. Oxford University Press.
    This volume presents a collection of about 80 very brief, accessible essays written by international experts from medicine, social sciences, and the humanities, ...
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  8. Umberto Curi (2006). Un Filosofo Al Cinema. Tascabili Bompiani.
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  9. Angela Curran (2016). Fictional Indeterminacy, Imagined Seeing, and Cinematic Narration. In Katherine Thomson-Jones (ed.), Current Controversies in the Philosophy of Film. Routledge 99-114.
    This paper focuses on the debate over two central claims regarding cinematic narration: the claim that there are implicit cinematic narrators and the thesis that when we watch movies, we imagine seeing the events and characters in the film fiction. I examine what a consideration of the indeterminate nature of fictional narration, that is, what is specified by the fiction about how we come to imagine the story events, can contribute to the debate on these issues. It is argued that (...)
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  10. Angela Curran (2008). Brecht. In Paisley Livingston & Carl Plantinga (eds.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Film. Routledge
    This paper focuses on philosophical issues regarding Bertolt Brecht's engagement with film. Topics that are discussed include: Brecht's influence on filmmaking and film theory; the claim that Brecht held that mainstream films place viewers under the "illusion" that what they are watching on screen is real; Brecht's rejection of empathy; and the linkage of film form and socially critical content.
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  11. Angela Curran (2007). Shadow of a Doubt: Secrets, Lies, and the Search for the Truth. In David Baggett & William Drummin (eds.), Hitchcock and Philosophy: Dial M for Metaphysic.
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  12. Angela Curran & Carol Donelan (2008). Gender. In Paisley Livingston & Carl Plantinga (eds.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Film. Routledge
    "Gender" is a term that refers to the behavioral, social and psychological traits typically associated with being male or female. This article examines some central issues in the study of gender in film, including the link between filmic conventions and social ideology; gender and the viewer's emotional response to film; and challenges by cognitivist philosophers of film to the claim that movies effect the viewer through mobilizing unconscious responses.
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  13. Gregory Currie (1995). Image and Mind: Film, Philosophy and Cognitive Science. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about the nature of film: about the nature of moving images, about the viewer's relation to film, and about the kinds of narrative that film is capable of presenting. It represents a very decisive break with the semiotic and psychoanalytic theories of film which have dominated discussion over the last twenty years. The central thesis is that film is essentially a pictorial medium and that the movement of film images is real rather than illusory. A general (...)
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  14. Arnold Cusmariu, The Perils of Aphrodite.
    Cinema is an effective medium for communicating the Platonist attitude toward Beauty as an attribute worthy of moral respect, as case studies can illustrate. Mine focuses on the work of the French actress Carole Bouquet, who launched her career in Buñuel’s Cet obscur objet du désir (That Obscure Object of Desire). Part 1 shows sins against Beauty to be a unifying theme of Bouquet’s films, which leave no doubt as to the appropriate response. Part 2 combines Plato’s distinction in the (...)
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  15. Anna Caterina Dalmasso (2016). Le plan subjectif réversible: Sur le point de vue au cinéma à partir des écrits de Merleau-Ponty. Studia Phaenomenologica 16:135-162.
    When I am watching a movie, I perceive on the screen a space, which is united and lived, even if it appears as fragmented and separated from the world in which I live. But is the space of the cinematic frame equivalent or commensurable with the one I see through my own eyes? Are they opposed to each other or do they merge together? The most amazing example of the possible convergence of gaze and frame the film realizes is the (...)
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  16. William Day (1995). Moonstruck, or How to Ruin Everything. Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):292-307.
    A reading of the film Moonstruck (1987) is presented in two movements. The first aligns Moonstruck with certain Hollywood film comedies of the 1930s and 40s, those Stanley Cavell calls comedies of remarriage. The second turns to some aspects of Emerson's writing – in particular his interest in our relation to human greatness, and his coinciding interest in our relation to the words of a text – and shows how Moonstruck inherits these Emersonian, essentially philosophical interests.
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  17. Jean-Louis Déotte (ed.) (2011). Philosophie Et Cinéma. L'harmattan.
    En l'occurrence, au XXe siècle, le cinéma, alors que le XIXe était appareillé par la photographie. Dans une radicale philosophie de la temporalité comme la sienne, les appareils font chacun leur tour époque sans pourtant s'éliminer.
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  18. Ryan Drake (2009). Devices of Shock: Adorno's Aesthetics of Film and Fritz Lang's Fury. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2009 (149):151-168.
    Two critical yet comic elements, beyond the more obvious narrative of persecution, reveal themselves in Adorno's recorded nightmare. The first is comic because it so aptly displays his relentless critical impulse despite himself, the way in which theory invades the private sphere of his dreams: even in sleep, Adorno finds himself at once reading phenomena and on guard against a false transcendence from which they could, in the last instance, be deciphered.1 The second is more patently absurd, yet perhaps more (...)
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  19. Joerg Fingerhut, Sabine Flach & Jan Söffner (2011). Synaesthesia and Kinaesthetics. Peter Lang.
    A myriad of sensations inform and direct us when we engage with the environment. To understand their influence on the development of our habitus it is important to focus on unifying processes in sensing. This approach allows us to include phenomena that elude a rather narrow view that focuses on each of the five discrete senses in isolation. One of the central questions addressed in this volume is whether there is something like a sensual habitus, and if there is, how (...)
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  20. Anne Friedberg (2010). The End of Cinema : Multimedia and Technological Change. In Marc Furstenau (ed.), The Film Theory Reader: Debates and Arguments. Routledge
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  21. Rosalind Galt (2011). Doing Away with Words : Synaesthetic Dislocations in Okinawa and Hong Kong. In John David Rhodes & Elena Gorfinkel (eds.), Taking Place: Location and the Moving Image. University of Minnesota Press
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  22. Berys Gaut (2010). A Philosophy of Cinematic Art. Cambridge.
    A wide-ranging and accessible study of cinema as an art form, discussing traditional photographic films, digital cinema, and videogames.
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  23. Eddie George & Anna Piva (2012). Dis-)Continuities of the Cinematic Imaginary: (Non-)Representation, Discourse and Theory. Imagi[Ni]Ng the Universe: Cosmos, Otherness and Cinema. In Saër Maty Bâ & Will Higbee (eds.), De-Westernizing Film Studies. Routledge
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  24. Christopher Grau (2015). Happy-Go-Lucky Revisited. Film-Philosophy 19:1-15.
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  25. Robert Hopkins (forthcoming). Realism in Film (and Other Representations). In Katherine Thomson-Jones (ed.), Current Controversies in the Philosophy of Film. Routledge
    What is it for a film to be realistic? Of the many answers that have been proposed, I review five: that it is accurate and precise; that is has relatively few prominent formal features; that it is illusionistic; that it is transparent; and that, while plainly a moving picture, it looks to be a photographic recording, not of the actors and sets in fact filmed, but of the events narrated. The number and variety of these options raise a deeper question: (...)
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  26. Steve Jones (2016). Torture Pornopticon: (In)Security Cameras, Self-Governance and Autonomy. In Linnie Blake & Xavier Aldana Reyes (eds.), Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon. I.B. Tauris 29-41.
    ‘Torture porn’ films centre on themes of abduction, imprisonment and suffering. Within the subgenre, protagonists are typically placed under relentless surveillance by their captors. CCTV features in more than 45 contemporary torture-themed films (including Captivity, Hunger, and Torture Room). Security cameras signify a bridging point between the captors’ ability to observe and to control their prey. Founded on power-imbalance, torture porn’s prison-spaces are panoptical. Despite failing to encapsulate contemporary surveillance’s complexities (see Haggerty, 2011), the panopticon remains a dominant paradigm within (...)
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  27. Andrew Kania (ed.) (2009). Memento. Routledge.
    Within a short space of time, the film Memento has already been hailed as a modern classic. Memorably narrated in reverse, from the perspective of Leonard Shelby, the film’s central character, it follows Leonard’s chaotic and visceral quest to discover the identity of his wife’s killer and avenge her murder, despite his inability to form new long-term memories. This is the first book to explore and address the myriad philosophical questions raised by the film, concerning personal identity, free will, memory, (...)
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  28. Andrew Kania (2009). The Philosophy of Motion Pictures • by Noël Carroll. Analysis 69 (1):194-195.
    Book review of _The Philosophy of Motion Pictures_ by Noël Carroll.
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  29. Gavin Keeney (2012). Dossier Chris Marker: The Suffering Image. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    This study firstly addresses three threads in Chris Marker’s work – theology, Marxism, and Surrealism – through a mapping of the work of both Giorgio Agamben and Jacques Derrida onto the varied production of his film and photographic work. Notably, it is late Agamben and late Derrida that is utilized, as both began to exit so-called post-structuralism proper with the theological turn in the late 1980s and early 1990s. It addresses these threads through the means to ends employed and as (...)
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  30. Paisley Livingston & Carl R. Plantinga (eds.) (2008). The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film. Routledge.
    The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film is the first comprehensive volume to explore the main themes, topics, thinkers and issues in philosophy and film.
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  31. Shawn Loht (forthcoming). The Relevance of Heidegger's Conception of Philosophy for the Film-as-Philosophy Debate. Film and Philosophy 19.
    Provides an account of philosophy adopted from Being and Time and later works of Heidegger in order to respond to key questions in the film-as-philosophy debate. I follow the school of Stanley Cavell, Robert Sinnerbrink, and Stephen Mulhall in the view that philosophy occurs in film in phenomenological ways that transcend mere argumentative discourse and logical analysis. Some of the views I counter include those of Bruce Russell and Paisley Livingston.
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  32. Scott A. Lukas & John Marmysz (eds.) (2009). Fear, Cultural Anxiety, and Transformation: Horror, Science Fiction, and Fantasy Films Remade. Lexington Books.
    This collection was inspired by the observation that film remakes offer us the opportunity to revisit important issues, stories, themes, and topics in a manner that is especially relevant and meaningful to contemporary audiences. Like mythic stories that are told again and again in differing ways, film remakes present us with updated perspectives on timeless ideas. While some remakes succeed and others fail aesthetically, they always say something about the culture in which_and for which_they are produced. Contributors explore the ways (...)
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  33. Christy Mag Uidhir (2011). An Eliminativist Theory of Suspense. Philosophy and Literature 35 (1):121-133.
    Motivating philosophical interest in the notion of suspense requires comparatively little appeal to what goes on in our ordinary work-a-day lives. After all, with respect to our everyday engagements with the actual world suspense appears to be largely absent—most of us seem to lead lives relatively suspense-free. The notion of suspense strikes us as interesting largely because of its significance with respect to our engagements with (largely fictional) narratives. So, when I indicate a preference for suspense novels, I indicate a (...)
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  34. John Marmysz (2014). The Myth of Scotland as Nowhere in Particular. International Journal of Scottish Theatre and Screen 7 (1):28-44.
    In a number of recent films, Scotland has served as the setting for dramas that could have taken place anywhere. This has occurred in two related ways: First, there are films such as Perfect Sense (2011) and Under the Skin (2013). These films involve storylines that, while they do take place in Scotland, do not require the country as a setting. Second, there are films such as Prometheus (2012),The Dark Knight Rises (2012), Cloud Atlas (2012), and World War Z (2013). (...)
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  35. John Marmysz (2013). The Lure of the Mob: Contemporary Cinematic Depictions of Skinhead Authenticity. Journal of Popular Culture 46 (3):626-646.
    In this paper I examine the history and style of the real-life skinhead subculture in order to clarify its nature and to highlight its preoccupation with the ideal of "authenticity." I then use the insights thus gained in order to understand why it is that the skinhead characters in such fictional films as Romper Stomper, American History X and The Believer are, despite their neo-Nazism, granted a sympathetic depiction.
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  36. John Marmysz (2011). Review of Scotland: Global Cinema: Genres, Modes and Identities. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 15 (2):159-165.
    A review of Scotland: Global Cinema, by David Martin-Jones.
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  37. John Marmysz (2004). Cultural Change and Nihilism in the Rollerball Films. Film and Philosophy 8:91-111.
    In 2002, a remake of the 1975 film Rollerball was released in theaters. It flopped at the box-office, disappearing quickly from movie screens and reappearing shortly thereafter on home video. While aesthetically horrendous, the remake of Rollerball is instructive, as it provides a point of contrast to the original film, highlighting a change in our culture’s manner of engagement with the difficult philosophical problem of nihilism. Both films share a roughly similar plot, yet in the differing manners that they explore (...)
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  38. John Marmysz (2002). The Cutting Edge Between Trash Cinema and High Art. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 6 (8).
    A review of Joan Hawkins' Cutting Edge: Art-Horror and the Horrific Avant-gard.
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  39. Rafe McGregor (2016). Narrative Representation and Phenomenological Knowledge. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (2):327-342.
    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that narrative representations can provide knowledge in virtue of their narrativity, regardless of their truth value. I set out the question in section 1, distinguishing narrative cognitivism from aesthetic cognitivism and narrative representations from non-narrative representations. Sections 2 and 3 argue that exemplary narratives can provide lucid phenomenological knowledge, which appears to meet both the epistemic and narrativity criteria for the narrative cognitivist thesis. In section 4, I turn to non-narrative representation, focusing (...)
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  40. Daniel Moseley (2012). Self-Creation, Identity and Authenticity: A Study of "A History of Violence" and "Eastern Promises". In Simon Riches (ed.), The Philosophy of David Cronenberg. University Press of Kentucky
    This essay explores philosophical questions about practical identity that emerge in David Cronenberg's films, "A History of Violence" and "Eastern Promises." I distinguish the metaphysical problems of personal identity from the practical problems and contend that the latter are of central importance to the topic of authenticity. Central scenes from both films are examined with an eye to their engagement with the issues of authenticity and self-creation.
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  41. Laura Mulvey (1993). Afterthoughts on "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema" Inspired by King Vidor's Duel in the Sun (1946). In Antony Easthope (ed.), Contemporary Film Theory. Longman 125-34.
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  42. Ted Nannicelli (2012). A Philosophy of the Screenplay. Routledge.
    Recently, scholars in a variety of disciplines—including philosophy, film and media studies, and literary studies—have become interested in the aesthetics, definition, and ontology of the screenplay. To this end, this volume addresses the fundamental philosophical questions about the nature of the screenplay: What is a screenplay? Is the screenplay art—more specifically, literature? What kind of a thing is a screenplay? Nannicelli argues that the screenplay is a kind of artefact; as such, its boundaries are determined collectively by screenwriters, and its (...)
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  43. Ted Nannicelli (2012). The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (5):763-766.
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  44. Alison Niemi (2003). Film as Religious Experience: Myths and Models in Mass Entertainment. Critical Review 15 (3-4):435-446.
    Abstract Popular film has become a significant venue for meaning?making in modern society. Like religion, film provides models for understanding and behaving within the social world. Like religion, film reinforces this content through emotional resonance. Myths slip under a viewer's intellectual defenses in the non?threatening guise of entertainment. In a mainstream culture skeptical of religion, film presents an alternative mechanism for the transmission and processing of ?religious? ideas and ideals.
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  45. Pyŏng-ch'ŏl Pak (2009). Saenggak Ŭi Ch'ang, K'ino Ai: Yŏnghwa Sok Ŭi Ch'ŏrhak Ii. Sŏgwangsa.
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  46. Pyŏng-ch'ŏl Pak (2001). Yŏnghwa Sok Ŭi Ch'ŏrhak. Sŏgwangsa.
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  47. Carl Plantinga (2009). Rethinking Affects, Narration, Fantasy, and Realism. Rethinking Affects, Narration, Fantasy, and Realism. Trauma, Pleasure, and Emotion in the Viewing of Titanic: A Cognitive Approach. In Warren Buckland (ed.), Film Theory & Contemporary Hollywood Movies. Routledge
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  48. Susannah Radstone (2007). The Sexual Politics of Time: Confession, Nostalgia, Memory. Routledge.
    The Sexual Politics of Time will be of interest tostudents and researchers of time, memory, difference and cultural change, in subjects such as Media and ...
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  49. Juneko Robinson (2010). Review: Nightmare Japan: Contemporary Japanese Horror Cinema. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 14 (1):350-360.
    A review of Nightmare Japan, by Jay McRoy.
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  50. Ian Schnee (2013). Ideology, Socratic Elenchus, and Inglourious Basterds. Film and Philosophy 17:1-22.
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