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  1. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2007). Some Suggestions for Developing an Africanist Phenomenological Philosophy of Science. In M. P. Banchetti-Robino & C. Headley (eds.), Shifting the Geography of Reason: Gender, Science and Religion. Cambridge Scholars Press.
  2. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2000). F.J.J. Buytendijk on Woman: A Phenomenological Critique. In Linda Fisher & Lester Embree (eds.), Feminist Phenomenology. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  3. Emanuela Bianchi (2006). Receptacle/Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus. Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction to (...)
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  4. Andrew Chignell, Terence Cuneo & Matthew Halteman (2015). Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments on the Ethics of Eating. Routledge.
  5. Sharon L. Crasnow (2001). Models and Reality: When Science Tackles Sex. Hypatia 16 (3):138-148.
    : Through a discussion of the way science has been used to address intersexuality, I explore an idea about how to understand science as objective and yet influenced by social, historical, and cultural factors. I propose that the Semantic View of theories provides a means of understanding how science describes reality, and I look at the way science has been used to distinguish the sexes to provide an illustration.
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  6. Mark Anthony Dacela (2011). Sexuality, Power, and Gangbang: A Foucouldian Analysis of Aannabel Chong's Dissent. In Noelle Leslie Dela Cruz & Jeanne Peracullo (eds.), Feminista: Gender, Race and Class in the Philippines, Manila. Anvil. 83-97.
    In January 1995, at the age of 22, Annabel Chong (whose real name is Grace Quek), a former pornographic actress/director set a world record (which has since been topped) for having the most number of sex acts, 251 with about 70 men, over a period of about ten hours, for a film called the World’s Biggest Gangbang. Chong claims in subsequent interviews that more than anything else, she did it to challenge the stereotypical notion that female sexuality is passive—that women (...)
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  7. Kathy Davis, Monique Leijenaar & Jantine Oldersma (eds.) (1991). The Gender of Power. Sage Publications.
    "This book does serve a very useful purpose in returning power to the centre of the feminist stage. . . . This book makes clear the ways in which the machinations of power are more subtle, widespread, and multiform than it sometimes appears. Further, the clarity of presentation means that it is also a text that can usefully be included on student bibliographies." --Women's Philosophy Review "The Gender of Power, which announces itself in the first line of its Preface as (...)
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  8. Allison Dube (1998). Fire with Water: Generations and Genders of Western Political Thought. Parhelion Press.
    pt. 1. Isabel Colegate's The shooting party -- pt. 2. Fire with water.
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  9. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2002). Judith Butler. Zur Einführung. [REVIEW] Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 55 (4):347-350.
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  10. Donald Hubin (2004). Review of Timothy Macklem, Beyond Comparison: Sex and Discrimination. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (5).
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  11. Emily S. Lee (2008). Ode to a Pot. American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 8 (1):17--18.
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  12. Sarah-Jane Leslie (forthcoming). Carving Up the Social World with Generics. Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy.
  13. Carolyn McLeod (2002). Self-Trust and Reproductive Autonomy. MIT Press.
    The power of new medical technologies, the cultural authority of physicians, and the gendered power dynamics of many patient-physician relationships can all inhibit women's reproductive freedom. Often these factors interfere with women's ability to trust themselves to choose and act in ways that are consistent with their own goals and values. In this book Carolyn McLeod introduces to the reproductive ethics literature the idea that in reproductive health care women's self-trust can be undermined in ways that threaten their autonomy. Understanding (...)
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  14. Mari Mikkola (2007). Gender Sceptics and Feminist Politics. Res Publica 13 (4):361-380.
    Some feminist gender sceptics hold that the conditions for satisfying the concept woman cannot be discerned. This has been taken to suggest that (i) the efforts to fix feminism’s scope are undermined because of confusion about the extension of the term ‘woman’, and (ii) this confusion suggests that feminism cannot be organised around women because it is unclear who satisfies woman. Further, this supposedly threatens the effectiveness of feminist politics: feminist goals are said to become unachievable, if feminist politics lacks (...)
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  15. Christina Shaheen Moosa & Nancy Tuana (2014). Mapping a Research Agenda Concerning Gender and Climate Change: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW] Hypatia 28 (4):677-694.
  16. Marjorie Rhodes, Sarah-Jane Leslie & Christina Tworek (2012). Cultural Transmission of Social Essentialism. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 109 (34):13526-13531.
  17. David Robjant (2011). Is Iris Murdoch an Unconscious Misogynist? Some Trouble with Sabina Lovibond, the Mother in Law, and Gender. Heythrop Journal 52 (6):1021-1031.
    If in our use of imagery we are all of us the unacknowledged legislators of the world, it would follow that one can ‘serve the cause of sexual equality in education’ by challenging the way our images of the academic are gendered. This is the excellent stated purpose of Sabina Lovibond's short new book, Iris Murdoch, Gender and Philosophy. The effect is as I shall show somewhat at odds with this.
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  18. Ruth Sample (2013). Autism and the Extreme Male Brain. In Jami L. Anderson Simon Cushing (ed.), The Philosophy of Autism. Rowman and Littlefield.
    ABSTRACT: Simon Baron-Cohen has argued that autism and related developmental disorders (sometimes called “autism spectrum conditions” or “autism spectrum disorders”) can be usefully thought of as the condition of possessing an “extreme male brain.” The impetus for regarding autism spectrum disorders (ASD) this way has been the accepted science regarding the etiology of autism, as developed over that past several decades. Three important features of this etiology ground the Extreme Male Brain theory. First, ASD is disproportionately male (approximately 10:1 in (...)
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  19. Devora Shapiro (2012). “Objectivity” and the Arbitration of Experiential Knowledge. Social Philosophy Today 28:67-82.
    In order to arbitrate conflicting propositional knowledge claims – such as when two individuals claim to know the height of a tree in the yard – there is (ostensibly) a “fact of the matter” about who is correct. Experiential, non-propositional knowledge, on the other hand, is not so obviously mediated. For one, experiential knowledge is -- at least partially – subjective. This means that one of experiential knowledge’s virtues is just that it is personal in its foundations and cannot be (...)
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  20. A. Stone, On the Genealogy of Women: Against Essentialism.
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  21. Alison Stone (2004). Essentialism and Anti-Essentialism in Feminist Philosophy. Journal of Moral Philosophy 1 (2):135-153.
    This article revisits the ethical and political questions raised by feminist debates over essentialism, the belief that there are properties essential to women and which all women share. Feminists’ widespread rejection of essentialism has threatened to undermine feminist politics. Re-evaluating two responses to this problem—‘strategic’ essentialism and Iris Marion Young’s idea that women are an internally diverse ‘series’—I argue that both unsatisfactorily retain essentialism as a descriptive claim about the social reality of women’s lives. I argue instead that women have (...)
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  22. Alison Stone, From Political to Realist Essentialism: Rereading Luce Irigaray.
    This paper re-examines debates surrounding Irigaray's 'essentialism', arguing that these debates have generated a widespread assumption that realist essentialism is philosophically untenable and that Irigaray must therefore be read as a non-realist, merely 'political', essentialist. I suggest that this assumption is unhelpful, as Irigaray's work shows increasing commitment to a realist form of essentialism. Moreover, I argue that political essentialism is internally unstable because it aims to revalue femininity and the body as symbolised, thereby reinforcing the traditional conceptual hierarchy of (...)
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  23. Robert Strikwerda & Larry May (1992). Male Friendship and Intimacy. Hypatia 7 (2):110 - 125.
    Our primary focus is the concept of intimacy, especially in the context of adult American male relationships. We begin with an examination of comradeship, a nonintimate form of friendship, then develop an account of the nature and value of intimacy in friendship. We follow this with discussions of obstacles to intimacy and of Aristotle's views. In the final section, we discuss the process of men attaining intimacy.
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  24. Catherine Vidal (2012). The Sexed Brain: Between Science and Ideology. Neuroethics 5 (3):295-303.
    Despite tremendous advances in neuroscience, the topic “brain, sex and gender” remains a matter of misleading interpretations, that go well beyond the bounds of science. In the 19th century, the difference in brain sizes was a major argument to explain the hierarchy between men and women, and was supposed to reflect innate differences in mental capacity. Nowadays, our understanding of the human brain has progressed dramatically with the demonstration of cerebral plasticity. The new brain imaging techniques have revealed the role (...)
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  25. Ken Wilber (2000). Sex, Ecology, Spirituality: The Spirit of Evolution. Shambhala.
    In a tour de force of scholarship and vision, Ken Wilber traces the course of evolution from matter to life to mind. In each case evolution has a "direction," a tendency to produce more highly organized patterns. The "spirit of evolution" lies in its directionality: order out of chaos. After arriving at the emergence of mind, Wilber traces the evolution of human consciousness through its major stages of development, pointing out that at each stage there is the "dialectic of progress"--every (...)
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