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Philosophy of Gender, Race, and Sexuality

Edited by Lynne Tirrell (University of Massachusetts, Boston)
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  1. added 2014-12-19
    Teresa Marques (2014). É o Género uma Construção Social? In A. P. Mesquita, C. Beckert, J. L. Pérez & Xavier M. L. L. O. (eds.), A Paixão da Razão. Homenagem a Maria Luísa Ribeiro Ferreira. Centro de Filosofia da Universidade de Lisboa. 561-578.
    É muitas vezes aceite que certas categorias, tipicamente as de género, raça, orientação sexual ou doença mental, são construções sociais e não divisões naturais no mundo. A distinção entre categorias naturais e categorias sociais, como pretende ser a distinção entre o sexo e o género, tem servido no âmbito da crítica e ciência social para advogar a abolição de certas normas sociais, e para a implementação de políticas mais equitativas. Contudo, há aspectos centrais do construtivismo que são pouco claros. O (...)
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  2. added 2014-12-12
    John Danaher (forthcoming). Robotic Rape and Robotic Child Sexual Abuse: Should They Be Criminalised? Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-25.
    Soon there will be sex robots. The creation of such devices raises a host of social, legal and ethical questions. In this article, I focus in on one of them. What if these sex robots are deliberately designed and used to replicate acts of rape and child sexual abuse? Should the creation and use of such robots be criminalised, even if no person is harmed by the acts performed? I offer an argument for thinking that they should be. The argument (...)
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  3. added 2014-12-10
    Neven Sesardic & Rafael De Clercq (2014). Women in Philosophy: Problems with the Discrimination Hypothesis. Academic Questions 27 (4):461-473.
    A number of philosophers attribute the underrepresentation of women in philosophy largely to bias against women or some kind of wrongful discrimination. They cite six sources of evidence to support their contention: (1) gender disparities that increase along the path from undergraduate student to full time faculty member; (2) anecdotal accounts of discrimination in philosophy; (3) research on gender bias in the evaluation of manuscripts, grants, and curricula vitae in other academic disciplines; (4) psychological research on implicit bias; (5) psychological (...)
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  4. added 2014-12-09
    Myriam J. A. Chancy (2014). Subjectivity in Motion: Caribbean Women's Articulations of Being From Fanon/Capécia to the Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands. Hypatia 29 (4).
    In this essay I show that texts by early Caribbean women writers, such as the Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands, reveal and resist the effects of colonial paradigms by leaving textual traces of how such paradigms can effectively be countered and overturned. I arrive at such a reading of Seacole via an analysis of Frantz Fanon's reading of Mayotte Capécia's turn-of-the-century novel, Je suis martiniquaise, in light of advances in postcolonial and feminist theory. I argue that doing (...)
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  5. added 2014-12-09
    Kim Q. Hall (2014). New Conversations in Feminist Disability Studies: Feminism, Philosophy, and Borders. Hypatia 29 (4).
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  6. added 2014-12-09
    Catherine Mills (2014). The Case of the Missing Hand: Gender, Disability, and Bodily Norms in Selective Termination. Hypatia 29 (4):n/a-n/a.
    The practice of terminating a pregnancy following the diagnosis of a fetal abnormality raises questions about notions of bodily normality and the ways these shape ethical decision-making. This is particularly the case with terminations done on the basis of ostensibly minor morphological anomalies, such as cleft lip and isolated malformations of the limbs or digits. In this paper, I examine a recent case of selective termination after a morphology ultrasound scan revealed the fetus to be missing a hand . Using (...)
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  7. added 2014-12-09
    Carly Thomsen (2014). The Post‐Raciality and Post‐Spatiality of Calls for LGBTQ and Disability Visibility. Hypatia 29 (4).
    In this article, I consider the ideologies that emerge when disability and LGBTQ rights advocates' ubiquitous calls for visibility collide. I argue that contemporary visibility politics encourage the production of post-racial and post-spatial ideologies. In demanding visibility, disability and LGBTQ rights advocates ignore, ironically, visible markers of difference and assume that being “out, loud, and proud” is desirable trans-geographically. I bring together disability studies and queer rural studies—fields that have engaged in remarkably little dialogue—to analyze activist calls for LGBTQ and (...)
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  8. added 2014-12-08
    Sean Epstein-Corbin (2014). Pragmatism, Feminism, and the Sentimental Subject. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (2):220-245.
    In trying to connect a primarily literary account of sentimental history and theory to a primarily philosophical account of feminist pragmatism,1 certain dangers emerge. One is to unintentionally privilege the genre of philosophy over the genres of poetry or sentimental fiction. In H.S. Thayer’s insightful Meaning and Action: A Critical History of Pragmatism, as but one example, philosophical writing subordinates other genres, such as poetry or novels, leading to readings of Dewey and James that disproportionately weight the influence of philosophical (...)
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  9. added 2014-12-08
    Birgitt Röttger-Rössler & Eva-Maria Engelen (eds.) (2006). "Tell me about Love". Kultur und Natur der Liebe. Mentis.
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  10. added 2014-12-08
    Eva-Maria Engelen (2003). Erkenntnis und Liebe. Zur fundierenden Rolle des Gefühls bei den Leistungen der Vernunft. Vandenhoeck Ruprecht.
    zur fundierenden Rolle des Gefühls bei den Leistungen der Vernunft Eva-Maria Engelen. Eva-Maria Engelen Erkenntnis und Liebe Zur fundierenden Rolle des Gefühls bei den Leistungen der Vernunft Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht Eva-Maria ...
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  11. added 2014-11-25
    Anita Silvers (2014). Becoming Mrs. Mayberry: Dependency and the Right to Be Free. Hypatia 29 (4).
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  12. added 2014-11-25
    Rosemarie Garland‐Thomson (2014). A Habitable World: Harriet McBryde Johnson's “Case for My Life”. Hypatia 29 (4):n/a-n/a.
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  13. added 2014-11-25
    Eva Feder Kittay (2014). Centering Justice on Dependency and Recovering Freedom. Hypatia 29 (4):n/a-n/a.
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  14. added 2014-11-25
    Merri Lisa Johnson (2014). Bad Romance: A Crip Feminist Critique of Queer Failure. Hypatia 29 (4):n/a-n/a.
    This article critiques Jack Halberstam's concept of queer failure through a feminist cripistemological lens. Challenging Halberstam's interpretation of Erika Kohut in The Piano Teacher as a symbol of postcolonial angst rather than a figure of psychosocial disability, the article establishes a critical coalition between crip feminist theory and queer-of-color theory to promote a materialist politics and literal-minded reading practice designed to recognize minority subjectivities rather than exploiting them for their metaphorical resonance. In asserting that Erika Kohut is better understood as (...)
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  15. added 2014-11-25
    Therí A. Pickens (2014). Octavia Butler and the Aesthetics of the Novel. Hypatia 29 (4):n/a-n/a.
    Octavia Butler depicts a character with physical or mental disability in each of her works. Yet scholars hesitate to discuss her work in terms that emphasize the intersection with disability. Two salient questions arise: How might it change Butler scholarship if we situated intersectional embodied experience as a central locus for understanding her work? Once we privilege such intersectionality, how might this transform our understanding of the aesthetics of the novel? In this paper, I reorient the criticism of Butler's work (...)
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  16. added 2014-11-25
    Stacy Clifford Simplican (2014). Care, Disability, and Violence: Theorizing Complex Dependency in Eva Kittay and Judith Butler. Hypatia 29 (4):n/a-n/a.
    How do we theorize the experiences of caregivers abused by their children with autism without intensifying stigma toward disability? Eva Kittay emphasizes examples of extreme vulnerability to overturn myths of independence, but she ignores the possibility that dependents with disabilities may be vulnerable and aggressive. Instead, her work over-emphasizes caregivers' capabilities and the constancy of disabled dependents' vulnerability. I turn to Judith Butler's ethics and her conception of the self as opaque to rethink care amid conflict. Person-centered planning approaches, pioneered (...)
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  17. added 2014-11-18
    Mimi Marinucci (2011). Feminism is Queer: The Intimate Connection Between Queer and Feminist Theory. Silkworm Books.
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  18. added 2014-11-08
    Harold Braswell (2014). My Two Moms: Disability, Queer Kinship, and the Maternal Subject. Hypatia 29 (4):n/a-n/a.
    Dominant Western discourses of motherhood have depicted disabled women as incapable of being mothers. In contrast to these representations, recent literature in disability studies has argued that disabled women can provide maternal care and should therefore retain custody over their children. This literature is commendable, but its emphasis on custodial rights excludes from the category of “mother” those disabled women who cannot maintain child custody. In this article, I challenge this exclusion via an account of my experience with my two (...)
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  19. added 2014-11-08
    Aimi Hamraie (2014). Cripping Feminist Technoscience. Hypatia 29 (4).
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  20. added 2014-11-08
    Anna Mollow (2014). Disability Studies Gets Fat. Hypatia 29 (4):n/a-n/a.
    This article invites disability scholars to “get fat,” that is, to support the goals of the fat justice movement. I argue that the contemporary politics of fatness can productively be read through the lens of disability studies’ social model. At the same time, I mobilize feminist critiques of the social model to push fat disability studies toward a more in-depth engagement with the topics of health and illness. Additionally, I contend that feminist scholars’ accounts of our personal relationships to fatness (...)
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  21. added 2014-11-08
    Margaret Price (2014). The Bodymind Problem and the Possibilities of Pain. Hypatia 29 (4):n/a-n/a.
    What is a crip politics of bodymind? Drawing upon Rosemarie Garland-Thomson's theory of the misfit, I explain my understanding of crip and bodymind within a feminist materialist framework, and argue that careful investigation of a crip politics of bodymind must involve accounting for two key, but under-explored, disability studies concepts: desire and pain. I trace the turn toward desire that has characterized DS theory for the last decade, and argue that while acknowledging disability desire, we must also attend to the (...)
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  22. added 2014-11-08
    Ashley Taylor (2014). The Discourse of Pathology: Reproducing the Able Mind Through Bodies of Color. Hypatia 29 (4).
    The growing field of feminist disability studies explores how human bodies are interpreted through cultural values and expectations surrounding physical and mental ability. This paper contributes to and expands upon this conversation by examining how the ideal of “able-mindedness” functions to maintain racial divisions and inequalities through attributions of cognitive and psychiatric disability to bodies of color. Drawing upon contemporary examples from popular social media, public policy, and academic discourse, the author shows how racialized and nonnormatively gendered bodies are identified (...)
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  23. added 2014-11-08
    Joshua St Pierre (2014). Distending Straight‐Masculine Time: A Phenomenology of the Disabled Speaking Body. Hypatia 29 (4):n/a-n/a.
    Drawing upon feminist, queer, and crip phenomenology, this essay argues that the distinct temporality of the lived, stuttering body disturbs the normalized “choreography” of communication and thereby threatens the disabled speaker's recognition as a speaking subject. Examined through the phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Alfred Schutz, the disabled speaking body is temporally “out of step” with the normalized bodily rhythms and pace of communicative practices in relation to both lived and objective time. Disciplined for his incalculable and therefore irrational bodily (...)
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  24. added 2014-11-05
    Elizabeth Brake (2014). Recognizing Care: The Case for Friendship and Polyamory. Syracuse Law and Civic Engagement Forum 1 (1).
    This paper responds to arguments that polyamorous groups or care networks do not qualify for equal treatment with marriages. It refutes the points that polyamory is inherently hierarchical or unstable, that there are too few people in such arrangements to mount an argument for recognition, that polyamory harms children, and that there are insurmountable legal and practical hurdles to network marriage. Finally, it respond to the charge that extending recognition to polyamorists will devalue the recognition of same-sex marriage.
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  25. added 2014-11-03
    Nicolas Delon (2012). Handicap et animaux. In Sandra Laugier (ed.), Tous vulnérables ? Le care, les animaux et l'environnement. Payot-Rivages. 99-121.
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  26. added 2014-10-30
    Alia Al-Saji (2014). A Phenomenology of Hesitation: Interrupting Racializing Habits of Seeing. In Emily Lee (ed.), Living Alterities: Phenomenology, Embodiment, and Race. State University of New York Press. 133-172.
    This paper asks how perception becomes racializing and seeks the means for its critical interruption. My aim is not only to understand the recalcitrant and limitative temporal structure of racializing habits of seeing, but also to uncover the possibilities within perception for a critical awareness and destabilization of this structure. Reading Henri Bergson and Maurice Merleau-Ponty in dialogue with Frantz Fanon, Iris Marion Young and race-critical feminism, I locate in hesitation the phenomenological moment where habits of seeing can be internally (...)
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  27. added 2014-10-30
    Alia Al-Saji (2013). Too Late: Racialized Time and the Closure of the Past. Insights 6 (5):1-13.
    In this paper, I explore some of the temporal structures of racialized experience – what I call racialized time. I draw on the Martiniquan philosopher and psychiatrist Frantz Fanon, in particular his book ‘Black Skin, White Masks,’ in order to ask how racism can be understood as a social pathology which, when internalized or ‘epidermalized,’ may result in aberrations of affect, embodiment and agency that are temporally lived. In this regard, I analyze the racialized experience of coming ‘too late’ to (...)
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  28. added 2014-10-28
    Dan Demetriou & Michael Prideaux, Gender Exaggeration as Trans.
    Surprisingly, it follows from commonsense premises about sex and gender that there is a widely-practiced variety of transgenderism we call sex/gender “exaggerating.” Recognizing exaggeration as trans has several important consequences. One is that, since most traditional cultures endorse exaggeration, trans lifestyles (depending on where you draw the line) are usually the default. But more importantly, recognizing that gender exaggeration is trans reveals a number of sex- and gender-discriminatory practices and intolerant attitudes: from pathologizing hypergender to restricting androgenic hormones, many people (...)
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  29. added 2014-10-14
    Carrie Figdor & Matt L. Drabek (forthcoming). Experimental Philosophy and the Underrepresentation of Women. In W. Buckwalter & J. Sytsma (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell.
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  30. added 2014-10-12
    Alison Reiheld (forthcoming). Asking Too Much? Civility and Pluralism. Philosophical Topics.
    In a morally diverse society, moral agents inevitably run up against intractable disagreements. Civility functions as a valuable constraint on the sort of behaviors which moral agents might deploy in defense of their deeply held moral convictions and generally requires tolerance of other views and political liberalism, as does pluralism. However, most visions of civility are exceptionless: they require civil behavior regardless of how strong the disagreement is between two members of the same society. This seems an excellent idea when (...)
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  31. added 2014-10-12
    Alison Reiheld (forthcoming). The Event That Was Nothing: Miscarriage as a Liminal Event. Journal of Social Philosophy.
    I argue that miscarriage, referred to by poet Susan Stewart as “the event that was nothing,” is a liminal event along four distinct and inter-related dimensions: parenthood, procreation, death, and induced abortion. It is because of this liminality that miscarriage has been both poorly addressed in our society, and enrolled in larger debates over women's reproduction and responsibility for reproduction, both conceptually and legally. If miscarriage’s liminality were better understood, if miscarriage itself were better theorized, perhaps it would not so (...)
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  32. added 2014-10-12
    Alison Reiheld, Gender Norms and Food Behaviors. Encyclopedia of Food and Agriculural Ethics.
    Food behaviors, both private and public, are deeply affected by gender norms concerning both masculinity and femininity. In some ways, food-centered activities constitute gender relations and identities across cultures. This entry provides a non-exhaustive overview of how gender norms bear on food behaviors broadly construed, focusing on three categories: food production, food preparation, and food consumption.
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  33. added 2014-10-12
    Alison Reiheld (2008). Feminism, Food, and the Politics of Home Cooking. American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 8 (1):19-20.
    In this paper, I argue the cooking is a fraught issue for women, and especially women who self-identify as feminist, because it is so deeply gendered.
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  34. added 2014-10-07
    W. Scott Cleveland & Lindsay K. Cleveland (forthcoming). The Defeat of Heartbreak: Problems and Solutions for Stump's View of the Problem of Evil Concerning Desires of the Heart. Religious Studies.
    Eleonore Stump insightfully develops Aquinas’s theodicy to account for a significant source of human suffering, namely the undermining of desires of the heart. Stump argues that what justifies God in allowing such suffering are benefits made available to the sufferer through her suffering that can defeat the suffering by contributing to the fulfillment of her heart’s desires. We summarize Stump’s arguments for why such suffering requires defeat and how it is defeated. We identify three problems with Stump’s account of how (...)
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  35. added 2014-10-06
    Yann Benétreau-Dupin & Guillaume Beaulac (forthcoming). Fair Numbers: What Data Can and Cannot Tell Us About the Underrepresentation of Women in Philosophy. Ergo.
    The low representation of women in philosophy (<30%) in English-speaking countries has generated much discussion, both in academic circles and the public sphere. It is sometimes suggested (Haslanger, 2009) that unconscious biases, acting at every level in the field, may be grounded in gendered schemas of philosophers and the discipline more widely and that actions to make philosophy a more welcoming place for women should address such schemas. However, existing data are too limited to fully warrant such an explanation, which (...)
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  36. added 2014-10-04
    Chris Keegan (2007). “Democratic Norms and Sexual Identity”. Phoebe: Journal of Gender and Cultural Critique, Vol. 19, No. 1: 2007, 1-10 19 (1:2):1-10.
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  37. added 2014-10-02
    Janet Radcliffe Richards (2014). Only X%: The Problem of Sex Equality. Journal of Practical Ethics 2 (1):44-67.
    When Mill published The Subjection of Women in 1869 he wanted to replace the domination of one sex by the other laws based on ‘a principle of perfect equality’. It is widely complained, however, that even advanced countries have still failed to achieve equality between the sexes. Power and wealth and influence are still overwhelmingly in the hands of men. But equalities of these kinds are not the ones required by the principle of equality that Mill had in mind; and, (...)
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  38. added 2014-09-30
    David Haekwon Kim & Ronald Sundstrom (2014). Xenophobia and Racism. Critical Philosophy of Race 2 (1).
    Xenophobia is conceptually distinct from racism. Xenophobia is also distinct from nativism. Furthermore, theories of racism are largely ensconced in nationalized narratives of racism, often influenced by the black-white binary, which obscures xenophobia and shelters it from normative critiques. This paper addresses these claims, arguing for the first and last, and outlining the second. Just as philosophers have recently analyzed the concept of racism, clarifying it and pinpointing why it’s immoral and the extent of its moral harm, so we will (...)
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