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  1. Ralph Acampora (2004). Oikos and Domus : On Constructive Co-Habitation with Other Creatures. Philosophy and Geography 7 (2):219 – 235.
    Semi-urban ecotones exist on the periphery and in the midst of many human population centers. This article addresses the need for and nature of an ethos appropriate to inter-species contact in such zones. It first examines the historical and contemporary intellectual resources available for developing this kind of ethic, then surveys the range of possible relationships between humans and other animals, and finally investigates the morality of multi-species neighborhoods as a promising model. Discussion of these themes has the effect, in (...)
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  2. Abraham Akkerman (2001). Urban Planning in the Founding of Cartesian Thought. Philosophy and Geography 4 (2):141 – 167.
    It is a matter of tacit consensus that rationalist adeptness in urban planning traces its foundations to the philosophy of the Renaissance thinker and mathematician Ren Descartes. This study suggests, in turn, that the planned urban environment of the Renaissance may have also led Descartes, and his intellectual peers, to tenets that became the foundations of modern philosophy and science. The geometric street pattern of the late middle ages and the Renaissance, the planned townscapes, street views and the formal garden (...)
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  3. Jonathan Aldred (2002). It's Good to Talk: Deliberative Institutions for Environmental Policy. Philosophy and Geography 5 (2):133 – 152.
    Most applications of cost-benefit analysis in environmental policy, and almost all the controversial cases, involve the use of contingent valuation (CV) surveys. There is now a relatively well-developed critique of CV as a method of public consultation on environmental issues. Theories of deliberative democracy have been invoked which question the individualistic, preference-based calculus of CV. A particular deliberative institution which has recently received much attention is the citizens' jury (CJ). While CJs and other deliberative institutions have come to be regarded (...)
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  4. Thomas Alexander (2003). Thinking in Place: Comments on Scott Pratt's Native Pragmatism. Philosophy and Geography 6 (2):225 – 236.
  5. Michael Thad Allen (2004). Second Thoughts on Gedachtes Wohnen. Philosophy and Geography 7 (2):253 – 256.
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  6. James S. Altengarten (1976). The History, Philosophy, and Methodology of Geography: A Bibliography Selected for Education and Research. Council of Planning Librarians.
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  7. Peder Anker (2004). A Vindication of the Rights of Brutes. Philosophy and Geography 7 (2):259 – 264.
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  8. Santa Arias (2009). The Geopolitics of Historiography From Europe to the Americas. In Barney Warf & Santa Arias (eds.), The Spatial Turn: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Routledge.
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  9. Not Available Not Available (2003). Politics and Worldview. Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):123-130.
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  10. Antoine Bailly & Lay James Gibson (eds.) (2004). Applied Geography. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Applied Geography, A World Perspective reviews progress in applied geography in different regions of the world. It does this through the eyes of an international panel of highly regarded academic practitioners. The book offers new prospects on the use of established approaches and explores exciting new territories. Together, the contributors provide a comprehensive picture of applied geography today. This book is of relevance to faculty and graduate students in the fields of geography, planning, public policy, regional science and other related (...)
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  11. David T. Beito (1987). Suburban Stateways. Critical Review 1 (2):42-50.
    CRABGRASS FRONTIER: THE SUBURBANIZATION OF THE UNITED STATES by Kenneth T. Jackson New York: Oxford University Press, 1985; 396 pp., $21.95.
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  12. Mauricio Berger, Cecilia Carrizo & Pastor Montoya (2006). Nuevas Geografías de la Hostilidad y Nuevas Modalidades de Composición de la Hospitalidad En Los Procedimientos Militantes Contemporáneos. In Carlos Balzi & César Marchesino (eds.), Hostilidad/Hospitalidad. Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Area de Filosofía Del Centro de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Filosofía y Humanidades.
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  13. R. J. Berry (1999). Environmental Education, Ethics and Citizenship Conference, Held at the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers), 20 May 1998. Philosophy and Geography 2 (1):97 – 107.
    The search for a worldwide environmental ethic is linked to the increase in environmental concern since (particularly) the 1960s, and the recognition that environ mental problems can have a global impact. Numerous people and organizations have put forward their understanding of the necessary components of such an ethic and these have converged in a series of international statements ( Stockholm Declaration on the Human Environment , 1972; World Charter for Nature , 1982; Rio Declaration on Environment and Development , 1992; (...)
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  14. Mark Billinge, Derek Gregory & Ron Martin (eds.) (1983/1984). Recollections of a Revolution: Geography as Spatial Science. St. Martin's Press.
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  15. Alison Blunt (2000). Dissident Geographies: An Introduction to Radical Ideas and Practice. Prentice Hall.
    The perspectives examined in the book reveal and resist certain power relations that have constituted geographical knowledge. The book has two main aims.
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  16. Alison Blunt & Cheryl McEwan (eds.) (2002). Postcolonial Geographies. Continuum.
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes 10 sider ad gangen og max. 40 sider pr. session.
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  17. Alastair Bonnett (2008). What is Geography? Sage Publications.
    This text offers readers a short and highly accessible account of the ideas and concepts constituting geography. Drawing out the key themes that define the subject, What is Geography? demonstrates how and why these themes - like environment and geopolitics- are of fundamental importance. Including discussion of both the human and the natural realms, the text looks at key themes like environment, space, and place - as well as geography's methods and the history of the discipline. Introductory but not simplified, (...)
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  18. Rachele Borghi & Antonella Rondinone (eds.) (2009). Geografie di Genere. Unicopli.
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  19. Shelley Braithwaite (1999). Sponsorship, Academic Independence and Critical Engagement: A Forum on Shell, the Ogoni Dispute and the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers). Philosophy and Geography 2 (2):246 – 248.
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  20. Gordon G. Brittan Jr (2001). Wind, Energy, Landscape: Reconciling Nature and Technology. Philosophy and Geography 4 (2):169 – 184.
    Despite the fact that they are in most respects environmentally benign, electricity-generating wind turbines frequently encounter a great deal of resistance. Much of this resistance is aesthetic in character; wind turbines somehow do not "fit" in the landscape. On one (classical) view, landscapes are beautiful to the extent that they are "scenic," well-balanced compositions. But wind turbines introduce a discordant note, they are out of "scale." On another (ecological) view, landscapes are beautiful if their various elements form a stable and (...)
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  21. Jerry Brotton (2005). Printing the Map, Making a Difference: Mapping the Cape of Good Hope, 1488-1652. In David N. Livingstone & Charles W. J. Withers (eds.), Geography and Revolution. University of Chicago Press.
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  22. Roger Brunet (2011). Sustainable Geography. Wiley.
    Sustainable Geography recalls the system and laws of geographical space production, tackles the hardcore of geography and presents models and organizations through a regional analysis and the dynamics of territorial structures and methods. The book also describes the general idea of discontinuities, trenches, the anti-dialectical and redivision-uniformity in the globalization and addresses the Transnational Urban Systems and Urban Network in Europe.
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  23. Stanley D. Brunn (1998). Issues of Social Relevance Raised by Presidents of the Association of American Geographers: The First Fifty Years. Philosophy and Geography 1 (1):93 – 106.
    Presidents of the Association of American Geographers (AAG) have frequently used their addresses to discuss major changes facing the USA and the world and the responsibilities of geographers. I investigate those addresses that raised questions about social relevance facing the scholarly community and society during times of economic depression, military conflict, and major social changes. Moral and ethical issues were also integral in some statements.
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  24. Rogene A. Buchholz & Sandra B. Rosenthal (2002). Plant Citing and Environmental Conflict: A Case Study. Philosophy and Geography 5 (2):165 – 177.
    This paper is based on a case study involving construction of a new petrochemical plant near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and the controversy surrounding its location. The paper will explore ethical issues raised by this plant, utilizing a pragmatic perspective that differs from traditional ethical frameworks. In developing and exploring the implications of this case, the complexities of its moral dimensions will be discussed, as well as the way the insights of classical American pragmatism provide a useful orientation for trying to (...)
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  25. Peter Burke (2005). Afterward: Revolutions and Their Geographies. In David N. Livingstone & Charles W. J. Withers (eds.), Geography and Revolution. University of Chicago Press.
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  26. Jason G. Bush (2009). Chacoan Road Systems as Products of Social Organization. Constellations 1 (1).
    The Chacoan road system is an understudied aspect of a very unique culture in New Mexico. The extensive roads present important evidence to the social structure of the Chaco people. A few theories have been presented about the reason for the roads, such as economic, administrative and religion. This paper argues that the roads were used for military purposes, because the roads provided quick access to all satellite townships in the region.
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  27. Anne Buttimer (1974). Values in Geography. Washington,Association of American Geographers.
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  28. Yunlong Cai (ed.) (2011). Di Li Xue Fang Fa Lun. Ke Xue Chu Ban She.
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  29. J. Baird Callicott (2003). Wetland Gloom and Wetland Glory. Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):33 – 45.
    Mountains were once no less feared and loathed than wetlands. Mountains, however, were aesthetically rehabilitated (in part by modern landscape painting), but wetlands remain aesthetically reviled. The three giants of American environmental philosophy--Thoreau, Muir, and Leopold--all expressed aesthetic appreciation of wetlands. For Thoreau and Muir--both of whom were a bit misanthropic and contrarian--the beauty of wetlands was largely a matter of their floral interest and wildness (freedom from human inhabitation and economic exploitation). Leopold's aesthetic appreciation of wetlands was better informed (...)
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  30. Allen Carlson (2002). Hargrove, Positive Aesthetics, and Indifferent Creativity. Philosophy and Geography 5 (2).
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  31. Allen Carlson (2001). On Aesthetically Appreciating Human Environments. Philosophy and Geography 4 (1):9 – 24.
    In this essay I attempt to move the aesthetics of human environments away from what I call the designer landscape approach. This approach to appreciating human environments involves a cluster of ideas and assumptions such as: that human environments are usefully construed as being in general ''deliberately designed'' and worthy of aesthetic consideration only in so far as they are so designed, that human environments are in this way importantly similar to works of art, and that the aesthetics of human (...)
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  32. Roberto Casati & Achille C. Varzi (1999). Parts and Places. The Structures of Spatial Representation. The Mit Press.
    Thinking about space is thinking about spatial things. The table is on the carpet; hence the carpet is under the table. The vase is in the box; hence the box is not in the vase. But what does it mean for an object to be somewhere? How are objects tied to the space they occupy? This book is concerned with these and other fundamental issues in the philosophy of spatial representation. Our starting point is an analysis of the interplay between (...)
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  33. Edward S. Casey (2001). J.E. Malpas's Place and Experience: A Philosophical Topography (Cambridge University Press, 1999) Converging and Diverging in/on Place. Philosophy and Geography 4 (2):225 – 230.
    (2001). J.E. Malpas's Place and Experience: A Philosophical Topography (Cambridge University Press, 1999) Converging and diverging in/on place. Philosophy & Geography: Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 225-230. doi: 10.1080/10903770123141.
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  34. Noel Castree & Derek Gregory (eds.) (2006). David Harvey: A Critical Reader. Blackwell Pub..
    This book critically interrogates the work of David Harvey, one of the world’s most influential geographers, and one of its best known Marxists. Considers the entire range of Harvey’s oeuvre, from the nature of urbanism to environmental issues. Written by contributors from across the human sciences, operating with a range of critical theories. Focuses on key themes in Harvey’s work. Contains a consolidated bibliography of Harvey’s writings.
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  35. Vera Chouinard (2000). Disability, Geography and Ethics. Philosophy and Geography 3 (1):70 – 80.
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  36. John Clark (1997). The Dialectical Social Geography of Elisée Reclus. Philosophy and Geography 1:117-142.
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  37. Paul Cloke, Phil Cooke, Jenny Cursons, Paul Milbourne & Rebekah Widdowfield (2000). Ethics, Place and Environment, Reflexivity and Research: Encounters with Homeless People. Philosophy and Geography 3 (2):133 – 154.
    This paper reflects on ethical issues raised in research with homeless people in rural areas. It argues that the significant embracing of dialogic and reflexive approaches to social research is likely to render standard approaches to ethical research practice increasingly complex and open to negotiation. Diary commentaries from different individuals in the research team are used to present self-reflexive accounts of the ethical complexities and dilemmas encountered in offering explanations of the validity of the research, in carrying out ethnographic encounters (...)
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  38. Sebastián Cobarrubias & John Pickles (2009). Spacing Movements: The Turn to Cartographies and Mapping Practices in Contemporary Social Movements. In Barney Warf & Santa Arias (eds.), The Spatial Turn: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Routledge. 36--58.
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  39. Vincent Colapietro (2003). Bebop as Historical Actuality, Urban Aesthetic, and Critical Utterance. Philosophy and Geography 6 (2):153 – 165.
    This paper focuses upon "bebop" as a distinctively urban movement for the purpose of contributing to the articulation of a distinctively urban aesthetics. The author examines both how the music was taken up in such cities as New York, Los Angeles, Kansas City, St. Louis, and Chicago, and in turn how an urban sensibility was expressed in this particular movement.
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  40. Stuart Corbridge (1998). Development Ethics: Distance, Difference, Plausibility. Philosophy and Geography 1 (1):35 – 53.
    This paper defends some aspects of the intentionalist and internationalist worldviews of (an expanded) mainstream development studies against certain moral claims emanating from the New Right and a diverse post-Left. I contend that citizens and states in the advanced industrial world have a responsibility to attend to the claims of distant strangers. Although it is difficult to specify in determinate ways how this responsibility should be discharged—save for attending to basic human needs and rights—the responsibility itself derives from the interlinking (...)
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  41. John Corrigan (2009). Spatiality and Religion. In Barney Warf & Santa Arias (eds.), The Spatial Turn: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Routledge.
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  42. Linda A. Cotterrell & Tim S. Gray (1998). Sustainable Development and the International Whaling Commission's Moratorium on Commercial Whaling. Philosophy and Geography 1 (2):183 – 195.
    To many observers, the moratorium on commercial whaling, which came into force under the aegis of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) in 1986, is both a moral and an environmental victory. Moreover, many governments have found it to be an advantageous, easy and costless policy to support. However, a critical analysis of the diverse viewpoints of IWC member states, especially those expressed by the delegations of the United Kingdom, Norway and Japan at the 1996 Annual Meeting of the IWC in (...)
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  43. Cedric Cullingford (1999). Environmental Education, Ethics and Citizenship Conference, Held at the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers), 20 May 1998. Philosophy and Geography 2 (1):94 – 97.
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  44. Harry F. Dahms (2009). Retheorizing Global Space in Sociology: Towards a New Kind of Discipline. In Barney Warf & Santa Arias (eds.), The Spatial Turn: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Routledge.
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  45. Anna R. Davies (1999). Environmental Education, Ethics and Citizenship Conference, Held at the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers), 20 May 1998. Philosophy and Geography 2 (1):82 – 87.
    (1999). Environmental education, ethics and citizenship conference, held at the royal geographical society (with the institute of British geographers), 20 may 1998. Philosophy & Geography: Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 82-87. doi: 10.1080/13668799908573657.
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  46. Peter Dear (2005). Space, Revolution, and Science. In David N. Livingstone & Charles W. J. Withers (eds.), Geography and Revolution. University of Chicago Press.
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  47. Janet Donohoe (2002). Dwelling with Monuments. Philosophy and Geography 5 (2):235 – 242.
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  48. Nigel Dower (2002). Against War as a Response to Terrorism. Philosophy and Geography 5 (1):29 – 34.
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  49. Felix Driver (2001). Geography Militant: Cultures of Exploration and Empire. Blackwell Publishers.
    This book traces the emergence of a modern culture of exploration, as reflected in the role of institutions such as the Royal Geographical Society and the ...
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  50. James S. Duncan (ed.) (1989). On Narrative and the New Regional Geography. Dept. Of Geography, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University.
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1 — 50 / 249