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  1. Mahrad Almotahari & Damien Rochford (2011). Is Direct Reference Theory Incompatible with Physicalism? Journal of Philosophy 108 (5):255-268.
  2. William P. Alston (1964). Philosophy of Language. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall.
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  3. Robert R. Ammerman (1970). Belief, Knowledge, and Truth. New York,Scribner.
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  4. Rani Lill Anjum (2012). Paul Grice. In Joose Järvenkylä & Ilmari Kortelainen (eds.), Tavallisen kielen filosofia.
    Often we mean something else than what we have said explicitly. Consider the following scenario. I show up in a new flashy dress and ask my friend what she thinks of it. She always tries to help me improve my style and knows that I value her honest opinion. She looks at my dress and says: ‘Excellent fit, but have you gone colour blind?’. From what she says I do not take it that she is interested in whether I’ve got (...)
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  5. D. M. Armstrong (1973). Belief, Truth and Knowledge. London,Cambridge University Press.
    The book as a whole if offered as a contribution to a naturalistic account of man.
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  6. Sylvain Auroux (2004). La Philosophie du Langage. Puf.
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  7. Alfred Jules Ayer (1946). Language, Truth, and Logic. Dover.
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  8. Kent Bach, Introduction.
    Language is used to express thoughts and to represent aspects of the world. What thought a sentence expresses depends on what the sentence means, and how it represents the world also depends on what it means. Moreover, it is ultimately arbitrary, a matter of convention, that the words of a language mean what they do. So it might seem that what they mean is a matter of how they are used. However, they need not be used in accordance with their (...)
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  9. Maria Baghramian (ed.) (2012). Donald Davidson: Life and Words. Taylor and Francis.

    Donald Davidson (1917-2003) was one of the most prominent philosophers of the second half of the twentieth century. His thinking about language, mind, and epistemology has shaped the views of several generations of philosophers. This book brings together articles by a host of prominent philosophers to provide new interpretations of Davidson’s key ideas about meaning, language and thought.

    The book opens with short commemorative pieces by a wide range of people who knew Davidson well, giving us glimpses into the (...)

    This book comprises key articles first published in the International Journal of Philosophical Studies and previously unpublished commemorative pieces, and serves as a fitting dedication to the work and memory of a great philosopher.

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  10. Sanja Bahun (2012). Language, Ideology, and the Human: New Interventions. Ashgate Pub. Co..
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  11. Gilead Bar-Elli, Introduction.
    The meaning of words, according to Wittgenstein, is grounded in their use – in the ways they are used. This does not mean only that in order to know the meaning of a word we should look at its use; it is not only a practical recommendation for the linguist or the learner. It is rather a philosophical thesis about the very notion of meaning, according to which use is what constitutes meaning, and about what the very ascription of meaning (...)
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  12. Alex Barber & Robert Stainton, Concise Encyclopedia of Philosophy of Language and Linguistics.
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  13. Stephen J. Barker, Global Expressivism.
    There is a wide-spread belief amongst theorists of mind and language. This is that in order to understand the relation between language, thought, and reality we need a theory of meaning and content, that is, a normative, formal science of meaning, which is an extension and theoretical deepening of folk ideas about meaning. This book argues that this is false, offering an alternative idea: The form of a theory that illuminates the relation of language, thought, and reality is a theory (...)
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  14. Stephen J. Barker (2010). Cognitive Expressivism, Faultless Disagreement, and Absolute but Non-Objective Truth. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 110 (2pt2):183-199.
    I offer a new theory of faultless disagreement, according to which truth is absolute (non-relative) but can still be non-objective. What's relative is truth-aptness: a sentence like ‘Vegemite is tasty’ (V) can be truth-accessible and bivalent in one context but not in another. Within a context in which V fails to be bivalent, we can affirm that there is no issue of truth or falsity about V, still disputants, affirming and denying V, were not at fault, since, in their context (...)
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  15. Stephen Barker & Mihaela Popa-Wyatt (forthcoming). Irony and the Dogma of Force and Sense. Analysis 75.
    Frege’s distinction between force and sense is a central pillar of modern thinking about meaning. This is the idea that a self-standing utterance of a sentence S can be divided into two components. One is the proposition P that S’s linguistic meaning and context associates with it. The other is S’s illocutionary force. The force/sense distinction is associated with another thesis, the embedding principle, that implies that the only content that embeds in compound sentences is propositional content. We argue that (...)
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  16. Michael Beaney (ed.) (1997). The Frege Reader. Blackwell.
    This is the first single-volume edition and translation of Frege's philosophical writings to include his seminal papers as well as substantial selections from ...
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  17. James Beattie (1788/1974). The Theory of Language. New York,Ams Press.
  18. James Beattie (1788/1968). The Theory of Language, 1788. Menston, Scolar P..
  19. Robert L. Benjamin (1970/1969). Semantics and Language Analysis. Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill.
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  20. Gustav Bergmann (1962). Meaning and Ontology. Inquiry 5 (1-4):116 – 142.
    These are two related essays. The first, “Meaning,” defends the so-called reference theory against current criticisms. Exemplification and the intentional tie are two subsistents. Subsistence is a mode of existence; mere possibility is another. That requires two distinctions; one among four uses of 'possible'; one among three uses of 'same' in the phrase 'the same fact'; which in turn permits an adequate account of false belief. The second essay, “Inclusion, Exemplification, and Inherence in G. E. Moore,” displays the impact of (...)
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  21. Claudia Bianchi (2013). Implicating. In Pragmatics of Speech Actions, Handbooks of Pragmatics (HoPs) Vol. 2.
    Implicating, as it is conceived in recent pragmatics, amounts to conveying a (propositional) content without saying it – a content providing no contribution to the truth-conditions of the proposition expressed by the sentence uttered. In this sense, implicating is a notion closely related to the work of Paul Grice (1913-1988) and of his precursors, followers and critics. Hence, the task of this article is to introduce and critically examine the explicit/implicit distinction, the Gricean notion of implicature (conventional and conversational) and (...)
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  22. Sara Bigardi & Chiara Zamboni (eds.) (2011). Elementi di Filosofia Del Linguaggio. Quiedit.
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  23. Ben Blumson (2014). Resemblance and Representation. Open Book Publishers.
    It’s a platitude – which only a philosopher would dream of denying – that whereas words are connected to what they represent merely by arbitrary conventions, pictures are connected to what they represent by resemblance. The most important difference between my portrait and my name, for example, is that whereas my portrait and I are connected by my portrait’s resemblance to me, my name and I are connected merely by an arbitrary convention. The first aim of this book is to (...)
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  24. Albert Borgmann (1974). The Philosophy of Language. The Hague,Nijhoff.
    CHAPTER ONE THE ORIGIN OF THE PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE 1. The accessibility of the original reflections on language. Heraclitus The philosophy of language has ...
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  25. Keith Brown (ed.) (2006). Encyclopaedia of Language and Linguistics, 2nd Ed.
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  26. Ray Buchanan (forthcoming). Schiffer's Puzzle: A Kind of Fregean Response. In Gary Ostertag (ed.), Meaning and Other Things: Essays on Stephen Schiffer. Oxford University Press.
    In ‘What Reference Has to Tell Us about Meaning’, Stephen Schiffer argues that many of the objects of our beliefs, and the contents of our assertoric speech acts, have what he calls the relativity feature. A proposition has the relativity feature just in case it is an object-dependent proposition ‘the entertainment of which requires different people, or the same person at different times or places, to think of [the relevant object] in different ways’ (129). But as no Fregean or Russellian (...)
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  27. Edward Butler (forthcoming). Opening the Way of Writing: Semiotic Metaphysics in the Book of Thoth. In April DeConick, Gregory Shaw & John Turner (eds.), Practicing Gnosis: Ritual, Magic, Theurgy and Liturgy in Nag Hammadi, Manichaean and Other Ancient Literature. Essays in Honor of Birger A. Pearson. Brill.
  28. Shushan Cai (2007). Yu Yan, Luo Ji Yu Ren Zhi: Yu Yan Luo Ji He Yu Yan Zhe Xue Lun Ji = Language, Logic and Cognition: An Essay in Language, Logic and Philosophy. Qing Hua da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  29. M. J. Cain (2010). Linguistics, Psychology and the Scientific Study of Language. Dialectica 64 (3):385-404.
    In this paper I address the issue of the subject matter of linguistics. According to the prominent Chomskyan view, linguistics is the study of the language faculty, a component of the mind-brain, and is therefore a branch of cognitive psychology. In his recent book Ignorance of Language Michael Devitt attacks this psychologistic conception of linguistics. I argue that the prominent Chomskyan objections to Devitt's position are not decisive as they stand. However, Devitt's position should ultimately be rejected as there is (...)
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  30. Siobhan Chapman (2000). Philosophy for Linguists: An Introduction. Routledge.
    Philosophy for Linguists provides students with a clear, concise introduction to the main topics in the philosophy of language. Focusing on what linguists need to know and how philosophy relates to modern linguistics, the book is structured around key branches of linguistics: semantics, pragmatics, and language acquisition. Assuming no prior knowledge of philosophy, Siobhan Chapman traces the history and development of ideas in the philosophy of language and outlines the contributions of specific philosophers. The book is highly accessible and includes: (...)
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  31. R. Choudhury (ed.) (1984). Philosophy and Language: A Collection of Papers. Capital Pub. House.
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  32. Maurice William Cranston (1969). Philosophy and Language. [Toronto]Canadian Broadcasting Corp..
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  33. Mark Crimmins, Philosophy of Language. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  34. Sam Cumming (ed.) (2013). Meaning and Argument: An Introduction to Logic Through Language. Wiley-Blackwell.
  35. Donald Davidson (2005). Truth, Language and History. Oxford University Press.
    Truth, Language, and History is the much-anticipated final volume of Donald Davidson's philosophical writings. In four groups of essays, Davidson continues to explore the themes that occupied him for more than fifty years: the relations between language and the world; speaker intention and linguistic meaning; language and mind; mind and body; mind and world; mind and other minds. He asks: what is the role of the concept of truth in these explorations? And, can a scientific world view make room for (...)
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  36. Martin Davies, Foundational Issues in the Philosophy of Language.
    Linguistic expressions are meaningful. Sentences, built from words and phrases, are used to communicate information about objects, properties and events in the world. In philosophy of language, the study of linguistic meaning is central.
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  37. Martin Davies, Philosophy of Language.
    Philosophy of language deals with questions that arise from our ordinary, everyday conception of language. (Philosophy of linguistics, in contrast, follows up questions that arise from the scientific study of language.) But saying this does not yet give a clear idea of the sorts of questions that belong distinctively in philosophy of language. Wittgenstein said (1953, §119), ‘The results of philosophy are the uncovering of one or another piece of plain nonsense and of bumps that the understanding has got by (...)
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  38. L. M. De Rijk, H. A. G. Braakhuis & Gabriël Nuchelmans (eds.) (1987). Logos and Pragma: Essays on the Philosophy of Language in Honour of Professor Gabriël Nuchelmans. Ingenium Publishers.
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  39. Jan Dejnozka (1996). The Ontology of the Anayltic Tradition and its Origins: Realism and Identity in Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, and Quine. Littlefield Adams Books.
  40. Michael Devitt (1999). Language and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language. Mit Press.
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  41. Michael Devitt & Richard Hanley (eds.) (2006). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell Pub..
    The Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Language is a collection of twenty new essays in a cutting-edge and wide-ranging field. Surveys central issues in contemporary philosophy of language while examining foundational topics Provides pedagogical tools such as abstracts and suggestions for further readings Topics addressed include the nature of meaning, speech acts and pragmatics, figurative language, and naturalistic theories of reference.
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  42. Georg Dorn (2001). Ernest Lepore: Meaning and Argument. An Introduction to Logic Through Language. Malden, Mass., And Oxford, GB: Blackwell Publishers, 2000. [REVIEW] Grazer Philosophische Studien 62 (1):287-288.
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  43. Bradley Dowden, Truth. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Philosophers are interested in a constellation of issues involving the concept of truth. A preliminary issue, although somewhat subsidiary, is to decide what sorts of things can be true. Is truth a property of sentences (which are linguistic entities in some language or other), or is truth a property of propositions (nonlinguistic, abstract and timeless entities)? The principal issue is: What is truth? It is the problem of being clear about what you are saying when you say some claim or (...)
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  44. Mikel Dufrenne (1963/1968). Language & Philosophy. New York, Greenwood Press.
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  45. Chad Engelland (2014). Ostension: Word Learning and the Embodied Mind. The MIT Press.
    Ostension is bodily movement that manifests our engagement with things, whether we wish it to or not. Gestures, glances, facial expressions: all betray our interest in something. Ostension enables our first word learning, providing infants with a prelinguistic way to grasp the meaning of words. Ostension is philosophically puzzling; it cuts across domains seemingly unbridgeable -- public--private, inner--outer, mind--body. In this book, Chad Engelland offers a philosophical investigation of ostension and its role in word learning by infants. Engelland discusses ostension (...)
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  46. Gareth Evans (1985). Collected Papers. Oxford University Press.
  47. Delia Graff Fara & Gillian Russell (eds.) (2011). The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Language. Routledge.
    This volume provides a comprehensive and up-to-date survey of the field, charting key ideas and movements, and addressing contemporary research.
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  48. Derrick Farnell (2007). Communicating with Aliens. Think 5 (14):79-92.
    Wittgenstein once said that if a lion could speak, we would not be able to understand it. No doubt he would say the same about aliens. But is Wittgenstein correct? Derrick Farnell thinks not.
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  49. Antony Flew (1951). Essays on Logic and Language. Oxford, Eng.Blackwell.
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  50. Lia Formigari (2007). Introduzione Alla Filosofia Delle Lingue. Laterza.
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