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  1. Hubert G. Alexander (1972). The Language and Logic of Philosophy. Albuquerque,University of New Mexico Press.
    This book focuses on two primary concerns, language and philosophical thinking. The first part of the book examines the ways that language, particularly the English language, shapes and channels our thoughts. The second part considers the three basic processes in concept formation: abstracting, imagining and generalizing. Lastly, the rational process itself is examined, looking at definition, rational inquiry and philosophical system building. First published in 1967, this edition is a reprint of the 1972 enlarged edition published by University of New (...)
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  2. Terry Atkinson (ed.) (1974). Art & Language: [Proceedings I-Vi: Ausstellung], Kunstmuseum Luzern, [27. Januar-24. Februar 1974: Katalog]. [S.N..
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  3. Sylvain Auroux & Dino Buzzetti (1985). Introduction. Topoi 4 (2):129-129.
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  4. A. J. Ayer (2003). Preface to First Edition.
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  5. Tista Bagchi (2008). The Sentence in Language and Cognition. Lexington Books.
    The Sentence in Language and Cognition is about the significant role of the sentence in linguistic cognition and in the practical domains of human existence. Dr. Tista Bagchi has written a comprehensive assessment of the structure and cognitive function of the sentence and the clause in the context of real-world discourse and activities.The notions of sentencehood and clausehood with special reference to the semantic histories of the terms sentence and clause, including their ethical, legal, and administrative uses, are assessed. This (...)
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  6. Gordon P. Baker (1984). Language, Sense and Nonsense: A Critical Investigation Into Modern Theories of Language. B. Blackwell.
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  7. K. K. Banerjee (1988). Language, Knowledge, and Ontology: A Collection of Essays. Indian Council of Philosophical Research, in Association with R̥ddhi-India, Calcutta.
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  8. Pierre Baumann (2012). Troubles with Direct Reference. Dialogos (93):33-51.
    The Direct Reference view of proper names remains popular today, even though it is dogged by three longstanding problems: Frege’s puzzle of identity statements, Frege’s second puzzle concerning substitution in non-extensional contexts, and the problem of empty names. This paper criticizes the recent attempts by Braun and Soames to rescue Direct Reference from these traditional objections.
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  9. Joanne Mary Beil (1980). From Poetry to Philosophy: The Beginnings of Logic in Early Greek Thought. Dissertation, University of Southern California
    Finally, following Havelock, Plato's attack on poetry is seen as an argument against the educational medium which inhibited the development of philosophy, and the Republic is understood as a statement of what constitutes philosophical knowledge. The Phaedo is analyzed as an epistemological drama in which the participants, unable to offer arguments for the immortality of the soul which meet the criteria for philosophical reasoning stated in the Republic, are instructed in the method of logical deduction by Socrates, the model philosopher. (...)
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  10. Korzeniewski Bernard (2013). Magic of Language. Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (4):455.
    Language, through the discrete nature of linguistic names and strictly determined grammatical rules, creates absolute, “quantized”, sharply separated “facts” within the external world that is continuous, “fuzzy” and relational in its essence. Therefore, it is similar, in some important sense, to magic, which attributes causal and creative power to magical words and formulas. On the one hand, language increases greatly the effectiveness of the processes of thinking and interpersonal communication, yet, on the other hand, it determines and distorts to a (...)
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  11. John C. Bigelow (1977). Language, Mind, and Knowledge (Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. VII). Linguistics and Philosophy 1 (2):301-304.
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  12. Beth Bjorklund (1981). Walter Benjamin's Theory of the Magic of Language. Philosophy and History 14 (2):148-150.
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  13. Peter Bornedal (1997). Speech and System. Museum Tusculanum Press.
    2.2.4) Differance as Supplement 246 2.3) Anti-logics 248 2.3.1) Argumentative Incompatibility 249 2.3.2) Counter-Finality 250 2.3.3) Performative ...
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  14. Keri Brandt (2004). A Language of Their Own: An Interactionist Approach to Human-Horse Communication. Society and Animals 12 (4):299-316.
    This paper explores the process of human-horse communication using ethnographic data of in-depth interviews and participant observation. Guided by symbolic interactionism, the paper argues that humans and horses co-create a language system by way of the body to facilitate the creation of shared meaning. This research challenges the privileged status of verbal language and suggests that non-verbal communication and language systems of the body have their own unique complexities. This investigation of humanhorse communication offers new possibilities to understand the subjective (...)
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  15. David Braun, 379. Isbn 0-19-514528-3. $35.00.
    This excellent book is aptly titled, for in it Scott Soames systematically discusses and greatly extends the semantic views that Saul Kripke presented in Naming and Necessity . As Soames does this, he touches on a wide variety of semantic topics, all of which he treats with his characteristically high degree of clarity, depth, and precision. Anyone who is interested in the semantic issues raised by..
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  16. Waltraud Brennenstuhl (1982). Control and Ability: Towards a Biocybernetics of Language. J. Benjamins Pub. Co..
    This is the first of the two volumes the second volume being Thomas Ballmer s Biological Foundations of Linguistic Communication (P&B III:7) treating ...
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  17. Edward Brerewood (1614/1972). Enquiries Touching the Diversity of Languages and Religions. Genève,Slatkine Reprints.
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  18. G. A. Brutian (1963). The Philosophical Bearings of the Theory of Linguistic Relativity. Russian Studies in Philosophy 2 (3):31-38.
    In dealing with the whole complex of questions concerning human nature, no small role is played by the problem of language — the role of language in man's life — both personal and social. In successive periods of human history different representatives of social thought saw in different perspectives the role of language in human life and its influence on social development.
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  19. Douglas M. Burns (1974). Language, Thought, and Logical Paradoxes. [Bangkok,World Fellowship of Buddhists.
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  20. Lucie Čadková (2015). Do They Speak Language? Biosemiotics 8 (1):9-27.
    The question: are humans the only animals endowed with language? must be preceded by the question: what makes language a unique communication system? The American linguist Charles F. Hockett answers the second question by listing what he considers the criteria that differentiate language from other communication systems. His ‘design-feature’ approach, first presented in 1958, has become a popular tool by which the communication systems of non-human animals are guaranteed a priori exclusion from the notion of language. However, the results of (...)
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  21. Noam Chomsky (1980). From Language 35, No. 1 (1959): 26-58. Re-Printed by Permission of the Linguistic Society of America and the Author. Sections 5-10 Have Been Omitted (the Notes Are Therefore Not Numbered Consecutively). [REVIEW] In Ned Block (ed.), Readings in Philosophy of Psychology. Cambridge: Harvard University Press 1--48.
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  22. Noam Chomsky (1971/1972). Problems of Knowledge and Freedom: The Russell Lectures. Vintage Books.
  23. Tom Cohen (1994). Anti-Mimesis From Plato to Hitchcock. Cambridge University Press.
    The material elements of writing have long been undervalued, and have been dismissed by recent historicising trends of criticism; but analysis of these elements - sound, signature, letters - can transform our understanding of literary texts. In this book Tom Cohen shows how, in an era of representational criticism and cultural studies, the role of close reading has been overlooked. Arguing that much recent criticism has been caught in potentially regressive models of representation, Professor Cohen undertakes to counter this by (...)
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  24. Gemma Corradi Fiumara (1992). The Symbolic Function: Psychoanalysis and the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell.
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  25. Donald A. Crosby (1975). Horace Bushnell's Theory of Language: In the Context of Other Nineteenth-Century Philosophies of Language. Mouton.
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  26. Amitabha Das Gupta (1993). The Second Linguistic Turn. Intellectual Pub. House.
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  27. Jacques Derrida (1998). Of Grammatology. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    "One of the major works in the development of contemporary criticism and philosophy." -- J. Hillis Miller, Yale University Jacques Derrida's revolutionary theories about deconstruction, phenomenology, psychoanalysis, and structuralism, first voiced in the 1960s, forever changed the face of European and American criticism. The ideas in De la grammatologie sparked lively debates in intellectual circles that included students of literature, philosophy, and the humanities, inspiring these students to ask questions of their disciplines that had previously been considered improper. Thirty years (...)
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  28. Vincent Descombes (1986). Objects of All Sorts: A Philosophical Grammar. B. Blackwell.
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  29. Michael A. E. Dummett (1993). The Seas of Language. Oxford University Press.
    Michael Dummett is a leading contemporary philosopher whose work on the logic and metaphysics of language has had a lasting influence on how these subjects are conceived and discussed. This volume contains some of the most provocative and widely discussed essays published in the last fifteen years, together with a number of unpublished or inaccessible writings. Essays included are: "What is a Theory of Meaning?," "What do I Know When I Know a Language?," "What Does the Appeal to Use Do (...)
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  30. Sten Ebbesen & Russell L. Friedman (eds.) (1999). Medieval Analyses in Language and Cognition: Acts of the Symposium, the Copenhagen School of Medieval Philosophy, January 10-13, 1996 Organized by the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters and the Institute for Greek and Latin, University of Copenhagen. [REVIEW] Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters.
  31. Umberto Eco (1999). Serendipities: Language & Lunacy. Harcourt Brace.
    Serendipities is a careful unraveling of the fabulous and the false, a brilliant exposition of how unanticipated truths often spring from false ideas. From Leibniz's belief that the I Ching illustrated the principles of calculus to Marco Polo's mistaking a rhinoceros for a unicorn, Umberto Eco offers a dazzling tour of intellectual history, illuminating the ways in which we project the familiar onto the strange to make sense of the world. Uncovering layers of mistakes that have shaped human history, Eco (...)
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  32. Martin Schulz Editor, Lexicon of Arguments, Michael Dummett on Meaning, Meaning Theory, Meaning Change.
    The Lexicon of Arguments is a new online knowledge base displaying central statements of Analytic Philosophy together with counter arguments. It is a platform for excerpts and abstracts open for scholarly contributors. Contributions can be sent by a few clicks. Automatic translations are available.
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  33. Richard Edwards (1999). Review of Christopher Fynsk: Language and Relation: ... That There is Language. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 12 (1):103-112.
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  34. Richard T. Eldridge (1986). The Normal and the Normative: Wittgenstein's Legacy, Kripke, and Cavell. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 46 (June):555-575.
  35. Brian Epstein (2006). Review of Millikan, Ruth Garrett, Language: A Biological Model. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (5).
    Ruth Mil­likan is one of the most inter­est­ing and influ­en­tial philoso­phers alive. Her work is also hard to pen­e­trate. In this review, I try to present and assess her work on the nature of lan­guage, which is col­lected in this anthol­ogy. I also crit­i­cize her analy­sis of “nat­ural con­ven­tion” as well as her dis­cus­sion of illo­cu­tion­ary acts.
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  36. D. Evans (1981). EBERSOLE, F. B. "Meaning and Saying: Essays in the Philosophy of Language" and "Language and Perception: Essays in the Philosophy of Language". [REVIEW] Mind 90:459.
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  37. Robert A. Evans (1973). Intelligible and Responsible Talk About God. Leiden,Brill.
    INTRODUCTION INTELLIGIBLE AND RESPONSIBLE TALK ABOUT GOD How can we speak intelligibly and responsibly about God? This question poses one of the most ...
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  38. Stephen Everson (ed.) (1994). Language. Cambridge University Press.
    This third Companion To Ancient Thought is devoted to ancient theories of language. The chapters range over more than eight hundred years of philosophical enquiry, and provide critical analyses of all the principal accounts of how it is that language can have meaning and how we can come to acquire linguistic understanding. The discussions move from the naturalism examined in Plato's Cratylus to the sophisticated theories of the Hellenistic schools and the work of St Augustine. The relations between thought about (...)
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  39. John Fearn (1824/1972). Anti-Tooke. Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt,F. Frommann.
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  40. Juliet Floyd & Sanford Shieh (eds.) (2001). Future Pasts: The Analytic Tradition in Twentieth-Century Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This collection of previously unpublished essays presents a new approach to the history of analytic philosophy--one that does not assume at the outset a general characterization of the distinguishing elements of the analytic tradition. Drawing together a venerable group of contributors, including John Rawls and Hilary Putnam, this volume explores the historical contexts in which analytic philosophers have worked, revealing multiple discontinuities and misunderstandings as well as a complex interaction between science and philosophical reflection.
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  41. R. A. Foley (1995). Language and Thought in Evolutionary Perspective. In Ian Hodder (ed.), Interpreting Archaeology: Finding Meaning in the Past. Routledge 76--80.
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  42. Lia Formigari (1993). Signs, Science, and Politics: Philosophies of Language in Europe, 1700-1830. J. Benjamins.
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  43. Lia Formigari (1988). Language and Experience in 17th-Century British Philosophy. John Benjamins Pub. Co..
    The focus of this volume is the crisis of the traditional view of the relationship between words and things and the emergence of linguistic arbitrarism in 17th ...
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  44. Michel Foucault (1977). Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Cornell University Press.
    Language and the birth of "literature." A preface to transgression. Language to infinity. The father's "no." Fantasia of the library.--Counter-memory: the philosophy of difference. What is an author? Nietzsche, genealogy, history. Theatrum philosophicum.--Practice: knowledge and power. History of systems of thought. Intellectuals and power. Revolutionary action: "until now.".
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  45. Dorothea Frede & Brad Inwood (eds.) (2005). Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age. Cambridge University Press.
    Hellenistic philosophers and scholars laid the foundations upon which Western tradition developed analytical grammar, linguistics, philosophy of language and other disciplines. Building on the pioneering work of Plato, Aristotle and earlier thinkers, they developed a wide range of theories about the nature and origin of language. Ten essays explore the ancient theories, their philosophical adequacy, and their impact on later thinkers from Augustine through the Middle Ages.
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  46. Peter A. French, Theodore Edward Uehling & Howard K. Wettstein (1989). Contemporary Perspectives in the Philosophy of Language, Ii.
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  47. Riccardo Fusaroli, Nivedita Gangopadhyay & Kristian Tylén (2013). The Dialogically Extended Mind: Language as Skilful Intersubjective Engagement. Cognitive Systems Research.
    A growing conceptual and empirical literature is advancing the idea that language extends our cognitive skills. One of the most influential positions holds that language – qua material symbols – facilitates individual thought processes by virtue of its material properties (Clark, 2006a). Extending upon this model, we argue that language enhances our cognitive capabilities in a much more radical way: the skilful engagement of public material symbols facilitates evolutionarily unprecedented modes of collective perception, action and reasoning (interpersonal synergies) creating dialogically (...)
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  48. Christopher Fynsk (2000). Infant Figures: The Death of the Infans and Other Scenes of Origin. Stanford University Press.
    This volume juxtaposes philosophical and psychoanalytic speculation with literary and artistic commentary in order to approach a set of questions concerning the human relation to language. The multifold writing of the volume takes the form of a 'triptych' (following the model of works by Francis Bacon) rather than that of a thesis. The central section of the volume contains an extended dialogue on two textual passages from works by Maurice Blanchot and Jacques Lacan. The first part of the volume's triptych (...)
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  49. Karen Gammelgaard (1996). Two Studies on Written Language.
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  50. Joan Safran Ganz (1971). Rules. A Systematic Study. The Hague,Mouton.
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