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  1. Hannah Anglin-Jaffe (2013). Signs of Resistance: Peer Learning of Sign Languages Within 'Oral' Schools for the Deaf. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):261-271.
    This article explores the role of the Deaf child as peer educator. In schools where sign languages were banned, Deaf children became the educators of their Deaf peers in a number of contexts worldwide. This paper analyses how this peer education of sign language worked in context by drawing on two examples from boarding schools for the deaf in Nicaragua and Thailand. The argument is advanced that these practices constituted a child-led oppositional pedagogy. A connection is drawn to Freire’s (1972) (...)
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  2. Ralf-Peter Behrendt (2005). Affiliative Drive: Could This Be Disturbed in Childhood Autism? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):350-351.
    Affect mirroring allows infants to distinguish emotional and intentional states of significant others, which – in the pursuit of their own drive satisfaction, including satisfaction of the affiliative drive – become important contextual stimuli predictive of reward. Learning to perceive and manipulate others' attitudes toward oneself in pursuit of affiliative reward may be an important step in social development that is impaired in autism.
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  3. Marie-Laure Betbeder, Philippe Cottier, Colin Schmidt & Pierre Tchounikine (2006). Dialogue in Context, Towards a Referential Approach in Collective Learning. AI and Society 20 (3):314-330.
    In this article, we present research in the making of a collective work environment within the framework of a distance education course. We base our theoretical and methodological standpoints on examples of dialogical discourses recorded within the framework of this CSCL system called Symba. In fact, the results of previous research lead us to rethink our vision of the study of collaborative moments between participants in a computer-supported human learning environment that proposes several communication tools. Redefining the methodological process aiming (...)
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  4. Thomas Binder (1995). Designing for Work Place Learning. AI and Society 9 (2-3):218-243.
    The use of computers to support learning at work has for long been propagated. Although a large bulk of experience exists in this field, it is still an open question what role computer applications play and can play in the process of learning. It can even be questioned if the learning processes themselves are sufficiently well understood to enable designers and others to provide relevant support. In this article these questions are addressed with reference to experience gained with two projects (...)
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  5. William Bennett Bizzell (1934). The Relations of Learning. Norman, University of Oklahoma Press.
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  6. Bernard Blandin & Bernard Lietaer (2013). Mutual Learning: A Systemic Increase in Learning Efficiency to Prepare for the Challenges of the Twenty-First Century. [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (3):329-338.
    One of the few certainties we have about our collective future is that it will require a massive amount of learning, by just about everybody, everywhere. The time for generating as many creative and collaborative knowledge builders has come. Therefore, improving the efficiency of learning could very well become a key leverage point for successfully meeting the challenges of the twenty-first century. This paper explores the possibilities of using mutual learning as a systemic means to improve learning efficiencies. This is (...)
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  7. Claire Cassidy (2013). Philosophy with Children: Learning to Live Well. Childhood and Philosophy 8 (16):243-264.
    A filosofia com crianças, em todas as suas guisas, visa engendrar o pensamento filosófico e o raciocínio nas crianças. Muito é escrito sobre o que a participação na filosofia poderia fazer para a criança academicamente e emocionalmente. O que propomos aqui é que permitindo às crianças participar de diálogos filosóficos elas aprenderão uma abordagem que poderia dar suporte a sua participação na sociedade e que poderia envolvê-las na consideração e no arejamento de suas vistas, tomando decisões em suas interações e (...)
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  8. Michael Cholbi (2014). Introduction, Philosophy Through Teaching. In E. Esch R. Kraft & K. Hermberg (eds.), Philosophy through Teaching. Philosophy Documentation Center.
  9. Michael Cholbi (2013). Ethical Issues in Teaching. International Encyclopedia of Ethics.
    Learning is any process that, by engaging with a person's rational powers, results in an improvement in that person's knowledge, skills, behaviors, or values. Learning can of course occur unaided. Teaching, however, is the deliberate effort to induce learning in another person. The ethics of teaching, then, addresses the ethical standards, values, or traits that govern deliberate efforts to induce learning in others.
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  10. Michael Cholbi (2007). Intentional Learning as a Model for Philosophical Pedagogy. Teaching Philosophy 30 (1):35-58.
    The achievement of intentional learning is a powerful paradigm for the objectives and methods of the teaching of philosophy. This paradigm sees the objectives and methods of such teaching as based not simply on the mastery of content, but as rooted in attempts to shape the various affective and cognitive factors that influence students’ learning efforts. The goal of such pedagogy is to foster an intentional learning orientation, one characterized by self-awareness, active monitoring of the learning process, and a desire (...)
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  11. Vincent Colapietro (2013). Neglected Facets of Peirce's 'Speculative' Rhetoric. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (7):712-736.
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  12. Daniel R. DeNicola (2012). Learning to Flourish: A Philosophical Exploration of Liberal Education. Continuum.
    pt. 1. Toward a theory of liberal education. Mixed messages and false starts -- Liberal education and human flourishing -- pt. 2. Paradigms of liberal education. Transmission of culture -- Self-actualization -- Understanding the world -- Engagement with the world -- The skills of learning -- pt. 3. The values and moral aims of liberal education. Core values of liberal education -- Intrinsic value -- Educating a good person -- pt. 4. Obstacles, threats and prospects. Persistent concerns -- Newfound threats (...)
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  13. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2012). Role of Learner in Globalised Education. In Sebastian Velassery (ed.), Globalisation and Cultural Identities: Philosophical Challenges and Opportunities. Overseas Press, New Delhi.
    The implications of Globalization on education are multifaceted. However, roots of all these implications can be traced to the predominance of economic activity at the global level. The education and learning paradigm, around the world is under increasing pressure to meet the demands of the new knowledge and information-intensive global economy in a better way. This kind of pressure is challenging the traditional relationships between teachers and students and causing paradigm shifts in the process of learning. Especially, as noted by (...)
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  14. Elizabeth Dickson (2012). A Communitarian Theory of the Education Rights of Students with Disabilities. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (10):1093-1109.
    There is a lack of writing on the issue of the education rights of people with disabilities by authors of any theoretical persuasion. While the deficiency of theory may be explained by a variety of historical, philosophical and practical considerations, it is a deficiency which must be addressed. Otherwise, any statement of rights rings out as hollow rhetoric unsupported by sound reason and moral rectitude. This paper attempts to address this deficiency in education rights theory by postulating a communitarian theory (...)
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  15. Nina Bonderup Dohn (2011). On the Epistemological Presuppositions of Reflective Activities. Educational Theory 61 (6):671-708.
    Reflection is an ambiguous buzzword in contemporary educational and professional settings. Work has been done to clarify the concept theoretically, but a gap remains between such clarifications and actual reflective activities in educational and work-related practices. Reflective activities embody epistemological presuppositions about the nature of competence, knowledge, and learning, and about the relation between thinking, communicating, and acting. In this article, Nina Bonderup Dohn identifies the epistemological presuppositions of two paradigm cases of reflection (“solitaire reflection” and “communicative reflection”) and assesses (...)
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  16. Joseph Dunne & Pádraig Hogan (eds.) (2004). Education and Practice: Upholding the Integrity of Teaching and Learning. Blackwell.
  17. Richard Edwards, Gert Biesta & Mary Thorpe (eds.) (2009). Rethinking Contexts for Learning and Teaching. Routledge.
    It specifically addressesWhat constitutes a context for learning?How do we engage the full resources of learners for learning?What are the relationships between ...
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  18. Mary-Jane Eisen (2000). Peer Learning Partnerships. Inquiry 19 (3):5-19.
    Peer learning partnerships are voluntary, reciprocal helping relationships between individuals of comparable status, who share a common or closely related learning / development objective. These dyadic or small group partnerships often occur incidentally or are confused with mentoring; hence they are easily overlooked and / or misunderstood. Yet they warrant the attention of professional developers,classroom teachers, and others as an intentionallearning strategy because of their potential to foster bi-directional learning through joint reflection.Using her qualitative case study of peer learning partnerships (...)
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  19. Michael Farrell (2013). New Perspectives in Special Education: Contemporary Philosophical Debates. Routledge.
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  20. Brian Findsen (2007). Freirean Philosophy and Pedagogy in the Adult Education Context: The Case of Older Adults' Learning. Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (6):545-559.
  21. Mike Fleetham (2006). Multiple Intelligences in Practice: Enhancing Self-Esteem and Learning in the Classroom. Network Continuum Education.
    This accessible guide gives a clear introduction to MI and provides concrete examples of how you can use it in your teaching.
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  22. Karen François, Kathleen Coessens & Jean Paul Van Bendegem (2012). The Interplay of Psychology and Mathematics Education: From the Attraction of Psychology to the Discovery of the Social. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (3):370-385.
    It is a rather safe statement to claim that the social dimensions of the scientific process are accepted in a fair share of studies in the philosophy of science. It is a somewhat safe statement to claim that the social dimensions are now seen as an essential element in the understanding of what human cognition is and how it functions. But it would be a rather unsafe statement to claim that the social is fully accepted in the philosophy of mathematics. (...)
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  23. Jeff Frank (2012). The Significance of the Poetic in Early Childhood Education: Stanley Cavell and Lucy Sprague Mitchell on Language Learning. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (4):327-338.
    This paper begins with a discussion of Stanley Cavell’s philosophy of language learning. Young people learn more than the meaning of words when acquiring language: they learn about (the quality of) our form of life. If we—as early childhood educators—see language teaching as something like handing some inert thing to a child, then we unduly limit the possibilities of education for that child. Cavell argues that we must become poets if we are to be the type of representatives of language (...)
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  24. Ellen Fridland & Anna Strasser, Philosophy of Learning. Encyclopedia of the Sciences of Learning.
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  25. Robert Garnett & Kristin Klopfenstein (2004). Critical Thinking as an Interpersonal Experience. Inquiry 23 (3):11-16.
    Students enter the classroom with a variety of perspectives and beliefs, adhering strongly to such beliefs that are most likely acquired from the teachings of certain authorities. Educators seeking to promote critical thinking often encounter resistance from those students who are primarily interested only in dismantling the arguments of others, as opposed to students’ being skeptical of their own beliefs as well. This paper suggests that educators can promote strong-sense critical thinking through the use of joint inquiry, striving to create (...)
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  26. Ilse Geerinck, Jan Masschelein & Maarten Simons (2010). Teaching and Knowledge: A Necessary Combination? An Elaboration of Forms of Teachers' Reflexivity. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (4):379-393.
  27. Bryan R. Gibson, Timothy T. Rogers & Xiaojin Zhu (2013). Human Semi-Supervised Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (1):132-172.
    Most empirical work in human categorization has studied learning in either fully supervised or fully unsupervised scenarios. Most real-world learning scenarios, however, are semi-supervised: Learners receive a great deal of unlabeled information from the world, coupled with occasional experiences in which items are directly labeled by a knowledgeable source. A large body of work in machine learning has investigated how learning can exploit both labeled and unlabeled data provided to a learner. Using equivalences between models found in human categorization and (...)
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  28. Jason Goulah (2012). Daisaku Ikeda and Value-Creative Dialogue: A New Current in Interculturalism and Educational Philosophy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):997-1009.
    This article focuses on Daisaku Ikeda's (1928– ) philosophy and practice of intercultural dialogue—what I call ‘value-creative dialogue’—as a new current in interculturalism and educational philosophy and theory. I use excerpts from Ikeda's writings to consider two aspects of his approach to dialogue. First, I locate his approach philosophically in Buddhism; in the examples of dialogue modeled by Ikeda's mentor, Josei Toda (1900–1958), and by Toda's mentor, Tsunesaburo Makiguchi (1871–1944); and in Makiguchi's theory of value creation (soka) and value-creating pedagogy. (...)
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  29. D. B. Gowin (2005). The Art of Educating with V Diagrams. Cambridge University Press.
    This book focuses on the mind and its ability to seek answers to unknown or unanswered questions. The theory of educating provides the grounding for using V diagrams by students, educators, researchers, and parents. Teachers make lesson plans using V diagrams and concept maps. They become expert coaches in guiding student performances. Students learn to construct their own knowledge. They change from question-answerers to question-askers. Parents share meaning with their children and their children's teachers and administrators. Administrators monitor programs and (...)
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  30. Maughn Gregory & David Granger (2012). Introduction: John Dewey on Philosophy and Childhood. Education and Culture 28 (2):1-25.
    John Dewey was not a philosopher of education in the now-traditional sense of a doctor of philosophy who examines educational ends, means, and controversies through the disciplinary lenses of epistemology, ethics, and political theory, or of agenda-driven schools such as existentialism, feminism, and critical theory. Rather, Dewey was both an educator and a philosopher, and he saw in each discipline reconstructive possibilities for the other, famously characterizing "philosophy . . . as the general theory of education" (1985, p. 338). Dewey (...)
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  31. W. A. Hart (2012). What Lessons Can We Learn? Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (4):663-673.
    It has become commonplace to ask, whenever anything has gone wrong, what lessons can be learned from the experience. But the appearance of open-endedness in that question is misleading: not every answer that we could give to it is acceptable. There are, in the context of such a question, tacit constraints in what counts as a valid lesson to be learned. The article considers what these constraints might be and the different kinds of lessons one might learn from experience, which (...)
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  32. Mark Holden, Era Buck, Mark Clark, Karen Szauter & Julie Trumble (2012). Professional Identity Formation in Medical Education: The Convergence of Multiple Domains. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (4):245-255.
    There has been increasing emphasis on professionalism in medical education over the past several decades, initially focusing on bioethical principles, communication skills, and behaviors of medical students and practitioners. Authors have begun to discuss professional identity formation (PIF), distinguishing it as the foundational process one experiences during the transformation from lay person to physician. This integrative developmental process involves the establishment of core values, moral principles, and self-awareness. The literature has approached PIF from various paradigms—professionalism, psychological ego development, social interactions, (...)
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  33. Knud Illeris (ed.) (2009). Contemporary Theories of Learning: Learning Theorists -- In Their Own Words. Routledge.
    In this definitive collection of today's most influential learning theorists, sixteen world-renowned experts present their understanding of what learning is and ...
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  34. Howard Mumford Jones (1969). Reflections on Learning. Freeport. N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.
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  35. Cushla Kapitzke & H. A. Y. Stephen (2011). School Education as Social and Economic Governance: Responsibilising Communities Through Industry-School Engagement. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1103-1118.
    This article examines shifts in educational and social governance taking place in Queensland, Australia, through Education Queensland's Industry School Engagement Strategy and Gateway Schools program. This significant educational initiative is set within the context of Queensland's social investment agenda first articulated in its education policy framework, Queensland State Education-2010. The article traces the historic extension of this overarching governmental strategy through establishment of the Gateway Schools concept, brokering state-wide industry-school partnerships with key global players in the Queensland economy. Industry sectors (...)
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  36. Lyn Lesch (2008). How to Prepare Students for the Information Age and Global Marketplace: Creative Learning in Action. Rowman & Littlefield Education.
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  37. Fabrizio Macagno & Aikaterini Konstantinidou (2013). What Students' Arguments Can Tell Us: Using Argumentation Schemes in Science Education. [REVIEW] Argumentation 27 (3):225-243.
    The relationship between teaching and argumentation is becoming a crucial issue in the field of education and, in particular, science education. Teaching has been analyzed as a dialogue aimed at persuading the interlocutors, introducing a conceptual change that needs to be grounded on the audience’s background knowledge. This paper addresses this issue from a perspective of argumentation studies. Our claim is that argumentation schemes, namely abstract patterns of argument, can be an instrument for reconstructing the tacit premises in students’ argumentative (...)
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  38. Sharan B. Merriam (ed.) (2007). Non-Western Perspectives on Learning and Knowing. Krieger Pub. Co..
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  39. Gregory M. Nixon (2012). You Are Not Your Brain: Against 'Teaching to the Brain'. Review of Higher Education and Self-Learning 5 (15):69-83.
    Since educators are always looking for ways to improve their practice, and since empirical science is now accepted in our worldview as the final arbiter of truth, it is no surprise they have been lured toward cognitive neuroscience in hopes that discovering how the brain learns will provide a nutshell explanation for student learning in general. I argue that identifying the person with the brain is scientism (not science), that the brain is not the person, and that it is the (...)
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  40. Francis J. Schweigert (1999). Learning the Common Good: Principles of Community-Based Moral Education in Restorative Justice. Journal of Moral Education 28 (2):163-183.
    This study investigates the educative process in restorative justice reforms, revealing three characteristics effective in facilitating moral learning for the common good. These three characteristics can be formulated as principles to guide the theory and practice of communitybased moral education. First, restorative justice brings the moral authority in personal communal traditions and the moral authority in impersonal universal norms together in a mutually reinforcing combination. Secondly, restorative justice processes focus on the "space between places" in social relations-not on individuals or (...)
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  41. Robert Keith Shaw (2010). The Violence in Learning. Analysis and Metaphysics 9:76-100.
    This paper argues that learning is inherently violent. It examines the way in which Heidegger uses – and refrains from using – the concept in his account of Dasein. Heidegger explicitly discussed “learning” in 1951 and he used of the word in several contexts. Although he confines his use of “learning” to the ontic side of the ontic-ontological divide, there are aspects of what he says that open the door to an ontological analogue of the ontic learning. In this discussion (...)
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  42. Robert Keith Shaw (2007). Pedagogic Thinking That Grounds E-Learning for Secondary School Science Students in New Zealand. E-Learning and Digital Media 4 (4):471-481.
    Course designers adopted a language-learners approach to the online teaching of New Zealand secondary school students in the subject of astronomy. This was possible because the curriculum for astronomy that was in 2004 established as a part of New Zealand's national curriculum was specifically designed to engage underachieving students in science and technology. A criterion-referenced assessment regime was established and an Internet platform was built specifically to facilitate this form of assessment. This platform contrasts with the norm-referenced assessment programmes that (...)
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  43. B. van Oers (ed.) (2008). The Transformation of Learning: Advances in Cultural-Historical Activity Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    Learning is a changing phenomenon, depending on the advances in theory and research. This book presents a relatively new approach to learning, based on meaningful human activities in cultural practices and in collaboration with others. It draws extensively from the ideas of Lev Vygotsky and his recent followers. The book presents ideas that elaborate this learning theory and also gives recent developments and applications of this approach in a variety of educational situations in and outside of school. A core issue (...)
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  44. Christopher Winch (1998). The Philosophy of Human Learning. Routledge.
    Christopher Winch launches a vigorous Wittgensteinian attack on both the "romantic" Rousseauian and the "scientific" cognitivist traditions in learning theory. These two schools, he argues, are more closely related than is commonly realized.
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