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Subcategories:History/traditions: Philosophy of Love
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  1. Prudence Allen Sr (2012). The Nature of Love. Review of Metaphysics 65 (2):427-429.
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  2. Sr Prudence Allen (2012). The Nature of Love. Review of Metaphysics 65 (2):427-429.
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  3. Donald Anders‐Richards (1974). Love and Morality. Journal of Moral Education 3 (2):129-133.
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  4. David B. Annis (1988). Emotion, Love and Friendship. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (2):1-7.
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  5. Christopher Arroyo (2011). Same-Sex Marriage, 'Homosexual Desire,' and the Capacity to Love. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):171-186.
    The issue of same-sex marriage continues to be controversial in the United States. Opponents of same-sex marriage offer a variety of objections in defense of their position. One such objection (which I identify as the Inability to Love objection, or ILO) is that legalizing same-sex marriage would promote a counterfeit good (homosexual marriage) as a genuine good (heterosexual marriage), since homosexuals are incapable of genuine, full erotic love. Proponents of ILO argue that homosexuals are incapable of genuine erotic love because (...)
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  6. Denis Avimadjessi (2004). La Messagerie du Cœur. Imprimerie Gutemberg.
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  7. Alain Badiou (2012). In Praise of Love. New Press.
  8. Debra B. Bergoffen (2005). The Subject of Love. Hypatia 20 (2):202-207.
  9. Telma de Souza Birchal (2012). O amor e suas regras em "Sobre Versos de Virgílio". Kriterion 53 (126):435-447.
    O presente artigo consiste em uma leitura do capítulo "Sobre versos de Virgílio". A primeira parte compara o amor com a amizade, questionando a tese de que a superioridade da última em relação ao primeiro é afirmada sem reservas por Montaigne. A segunda parte desenvolve uma interpretação do capítulo guiada pelas noções de "regra", "lei", "norma" e seus correlatos e identifica, a partir das diferentes perspectivas com que Montaigne aborda o assunto, três tipos de "regra": as regras dos homens, as (...)
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  10. Eric M. Cave (2003). Marital Pluralism: Making Marriage Safer for Love. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (3):331–347.
  11. Ruth Chang (forthcoming). &Quot;commitment, Reasons, and the Will&Quot;. Oxford Studies in Metaethics.
    This paper argues that there is a particular kind of ‘internal’ commitment typically made in the context of romantic love relationships that has striking meta-normative implications for how we understand the role of the will in practical normativity. Internal commitments cannot plausibly explain the reasons we have in committed relationships on the usual model – as triggering reasons that are already there, in the way that making a promise triggers a reason via a pre-existing norm of the form ‘If you (...)
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  12. I͡U. I͡U Chernyĭ (2004). Filosofii͡a Pola I Li͡ubvi N.A. Berdi͡aeva. Nauka.
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  13. Manuel Cruz (2011). Thinking About Love (Or the Experience of Writing on Sand). Iris 3 (6):7-22.
    Has philosophy paid sufficient attention to love? It is evident that the thinkers of the past expended a large part of their intellectual energies on talking about feelings, passions, emotions or affections, to mention just some of the terms under which, one way or another, love has tended to be subsumed. By doing so they undoubtedly granted it a philosophical importance, but not necessarily the kind that should be its due. Because love is much more than a philosophical subject with (...)
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  14. Caitlynn Cummings (2009). Law and Love: Legal Terminology in Roman Elegy. Constellations 1 (1).
    This paper analyses the use of legal terminology in Roman love elegy of the 1st century BCE. Catullus, Tibullus, and Ovid all employ this seemingly strange vocabulary in their love poetry for different ends, while also sharing some specific similarities. This legal vocabulary does not make these love poems stilted, dry, nor unemotional, but is used deftly and rather indicates an interesting layer of Roman concern and preoccupation.
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  15. László Czike (2004). A Szeretet Törvénye. Kairosz.
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  16. Henry Day (ed.) (2004). El Amor Como Aventura, Desafío, Disciplina y Servicio: Conversatorio. Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas.
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  17. Rosalyn Diprose (2009). Philosophy and Love: From Plato to Popular Culture by Linnell Secomb. Hypatia 24 (4):238-240.
  18. Keith Dromm (2002). Love and Privacy. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (2):155–167.
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  19. Derek Edyvane (2003). Against Unconditional Love. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):59–75.
    While unconditional love is frequently regarded as the best kind of romantic commitment, our commitments in general are not thought to be unconditional. In other contexts, we think conditional commitment (commitment which can in some sense be rendered intelligible by appeal to reasons) to be superior. This paper examines the peculiar status of unconditional love in the romantic context and argues that it is unwarranted; the best kind of romantic commitment should be viewed as conditional. The first part of the (...)
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  20. Richard Eldridge (2002). Romance and Politics/Romance and Folly: Thomas E. Wartenberg's Unlikely Couples. Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (2):322–329.
  21. Acylene Maria Cabral Ferreira (2011). Amor e liberdade em Heidegger. Kriterion 52 (123):139-158.
  22. Jean-Marie Frey (2005). Le Corps Épris. Pleins Feux.
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  23. Susan T. Gardner (2012). Love Them or Leave Them? Respect Requires Neither. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):253-268.
    The notion of “respect for persons” is a one often closely tied to the religious edict that “we ought to love one another.” It thus appears to give rise to a command that we are obliged to nurture some kind of positive regard toward others.Taking on a slightly different hue, Kant’s notion of “respect for persons” requires that we recognize universalizing agents as autonomous, and, hence, even if fanatical (Hare), we have no grounds to condemn.In this paper, both of these (...)
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  24. Paul Gregory (1986). The Two Sides of Love. Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (2):229-233.
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  25. Barbara Houston (2000). Unruly Desires and a Love Worth Wanting: A Serious Look at Wilson's. Journal of Moral Education 29 (3):339-353.
    In this paper I appraise John Wilson's ideal of (erotic) love between equals. Although I allow that the ideal is intriguing, one that leads to good conversation (in bed and out of it), in the end it is one I cannot endorse. My assessment of Wilson's ideal focuses on queries about who can count as equals and who takes responsibility for whose unruly sexual desires. I also note a particular moral peril associated with his ideal of intimacy. I find this (...)
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  26. Eileen John (2013). Love and the Need for Comprehension. Philosophical Explorations 16 (3):285 - 297.
    The question of how well we need to be known, to be loved, is considered. A ?second-person? model is argued for, on which love requires that the beloved's demands to be known be respected. This puts pressure on the idea that lovers need to make a beloved's interests their own, taking that to require comprehension of the beloved's interests: a lover would have to appreciate the normative intelligibility and motivating force of an interest. The possibility of love with failure of (...)
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  27. Rebekah Johnson (2013). Marriage and the Metaphysics of Bodily Union. Social Theory and Practice 39 (2):288-312.
    One current line of argument against the legalization of same-sex marriage, advocated primarily by the New Natural Lawyers, is that marriage is a pre-political institution that has, as an essential element, a bodily union requirement. They argue that same-sex couples cannot realize bodily union in their sexual activities and thus cannot meet the structural requirements of marriage. Accordingly, they argue that the same-sex marriage debate must be framed as a debate about what marriage is, and not, as it was in (...)
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  28. Muḥammad Ḥusayn Khalīlī (2003). .
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  29. Jean-Paul Maillard (2008). L'amour, Principe de L'Univers?: Essai Sur la Théorie du Tout. Aubin.
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  30. Kathryn Pauly Morgan (1986). Romantic Love, Altruism, and Self-Respect: An Analysis of Simone De Beauvoir. Hypatia 1 (1):117 - 148.
    I examine Beauvoir's moral assessment of Romantic Love in The Second Sex. I first set out Beauvoir's central philosophical assumptions concerning the nature and situations of women, setting the framework for her analysis of the intersubjective dynamic which constitutes the phenomenology of romantic loving. In this process four double-bind paradoxes are generated which can lead, ultimately, to servility in the woman who loves. In a separate analysis, I ask whether it is wrong for a woman to aspire to and/or choose (...)
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  31. Sven Nyholm (forthcoming). The "Medicalization" of Love and Narrow and Broad Conceptions of Human Well-Being. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics.
    Would a “medicalization” of love be a “good” or “bad” form of medicalization? In discussing this question, Earp, Sandberg, and Savulescu primarily focus on the potential positive and negative consequences of turning love into a medical issue. But it can also be asked whether there is something intrinsically regrettable about medicalizing love. It is argued here that the medicalization of love can be seen as an “evaluative category mistake”: it treats a core human value (love) as if it were mainly (...)
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  32. Sara Protasi (2014). Loving People for Who They Are (Even When They Don't Love You Back). European Journal of Philosophy 21 (4).
    The debate on love's reasons ignores unrequited love, which—I argue—can be as genuine and as valuable as reciprocated love. I start by showing that the relationship view of love cannot account for either the reasons or the value of unrequited love. I then present the simple property view, an alternative to the relationship view that is beset with its own problems. In order to solve these problems, I present a more sophisticated version of the property view that integrates ideas from (...)
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  33. John Protevi, Love.
    Once one of the most important philosophical concepts (it is impossible to think of Plato without erôs, or Aristotle without philia, or Augustine without caritas and cupiditas), love doesn't get much philosophical notice nowadays, at least outside psychoanalytic circles. Or so it seems. But couldn't one just as well say that Derrida and Deleuze think about nothing but love? What have they written that isn't linked rather directly to desire, to alterity, to getting outside oneself, even if "love" isn't among (...)
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  34. Heta Pyrhönen (2008). Ways of Keeping Love Alive. Sign Systems Studies 36 (1):49-69.
    The article examines Barthes’s A Lover’s Discourse (1977) in conjunction with du Maurier’s Trilby (1894) in order to present an argument about the similarities they share with the male masochistic fantasy as theorised by Deleuze in his Coldness and Cruelty (1989). Barthes’s insistence on the connection between art and love directs my approach. Trilby deals with love and aesthetics in the contexts of art, music, and narrative. The discourses of Trilby’s competing lovers over the same woman serve as a point (...)
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  35. Hoşeng Şêx Miḧemed (2005). Ezmûnî ʻeşq: Xwêndineweyek Bo Kitêbî (le Peywendîyewe Bo Xoşewîstî)y Rêbwar Sîweylî. Le Biławkirawekanî Senterî R̄onakbîrî Hetaw.
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  36. Brent A. Singer (1988). Spinoza on Returning Hatred with Love. Journal of Moral Education 17 (1):3-10.
    Abstract Spinoza claims that by nature each person strives to repay hatred with love. Given that there is still so much war and threat of war, taking ?war? in its broadest sense, it would seem paradoxical that Spinoza could be right. I argue that he is. My argument is based on a reconstruction of his views that are presented in the Ethics. Analysis of the argument resolves the seeming paradox, and consistently highlights the role of moral education in determining conduct (...)
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  37. Rêbwar Sîweylî (2004). Le Peywendîyewe Bo Xoşewîstî: Xwêndineweyekî Komełnasiyaney Peywendîy Xoşewîstî. Dezgeha Spîrêz Ya Çap U Weşanî.
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  38. Klaus Tanner (ed.) (2005). "Liebe" Im Wandel der Zeiten: Kulturwissenschaftliche Perspektiven. Evangelische Verlagsanstalt.
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Defining Love
  1. John Armstrong (2002/2003). Conditions of Love: The Philosophy of Intimacy. W.W. Norton & Co..
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  2. Martin S. Bergmann (1987). The Anatomy of Loving: The Story of Man's Quest to Know What Love Is. Columbia University Press.
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  3. Neil Delaney (1996). Romantic Love and Loving Commitment: Articulating a Modern Ideal. American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (4):339 - 356.
    This essay presents an ideal for modern Western romantic love.The basic ideas are the following: people want to form a distinctive sort of plural subject with another, what Nozick has called a "We", they want to be loved for properties of certain kinds, and they want this love to establish and sustain a special sort of commitment to them over time.
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  4. Eric Dowling (1995). Love, Passion, Action: The Meaning of Love and its Place in Life. Australian Scholarly Pub..
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  5. Harry Frankfurt (2001). The Dear Self. Philosophers' Imprint 1 (1):1-14.
    Frankfurt argues that self-love is the purest and -- paradoxically, perhaps -- most disinterested form of love.
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  6. Steven D. Hales (1995). The Impossibility of Unconditional Love. Public Affairs Quarterly 9 (4):317-320.
    There are two main ways to understand unconditional love. I argue that one is impossible (i.e., no one could love that way) and the other is probably irrational. This has important consequences in a variety of domains. Social policies have been derided on the grounds that they undermine unconditional love, and it has been called "possibly the most valuable aspect of the Christian tradition". The works of Robert Nozick, Elizabeth Anderson, and Richard Taylor on this topic are examined and criticized.
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  7. Bennett W. Helm (2010). Love, Friendship, and the Self: Intimacy, Identification, and the Social Nature of Persons. Oxford University Press.
    Bennett Helm re-examines our common understanding of ourselves as persons in light of the phenomena of love and friendship.
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  8. Christine A. James (2011). Communication in Online Fan Communities: The Ethics of Intimate Strangers. Empedocles 2 (2):279-289.
    Dan O’Brien gives an excellent analysis of testimonial knowledge transmission in his article ‘Communication Between Friends’ (2009) noting that the reliability of the speaker is a concern in both externalist and internalist theories of knowledge. O’Brien focuses on the belief states of Hearers (H) in cases where the reliability of the Speaker (S) is known via ‘intimate trust’, a special case pertaining to friendships with a track record of reliable or unreliable reports. This article considers the notion of ‘intimate trust’, (...)
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  9. Simon Keller (2000). How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count the Properties. American Philosophical Quarterly 37 (2):163 - 173.
  10. Alexander Moseley, Philosophy of Love. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  11. Hichem Naar (2013). A Dispositional Theory of Love. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (3):342-357.
    On a naive reading of the major accounts of love, love is a kind of mental event. A recent trend in the philosophical literature on love is to reject these accounts on the basis that they do not do justice to the historical dimension of love, as love essentially involves a distinctive kind of temporally extended pattern. Although the historicist account has advantages over the positions that it opposes, its appeal to the notion of a pattern is problematic. I will (...)
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  12. Jonathan Phillips, Luke Misenheimer & Joshua Knobe (2011). The Ordinary Concept of Happiness (and Others Like It). Emotion Review 71 (3):929-937.
    Consider people’s ordinary concept of belief. This concept seems to pick out a particular psychological state. Indeed, one natural view would be that the concept of belief works much like the concepts one finds in cognitive science – not quite as rigorous or precise, perhaps, but still the same basic type of notion. But now suppose we turn to other concepts that people ordinarily use to understand the mind. Suppose we consider the concept happiness. Or the concept love. How are (...)
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