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  1. E. M. Adams (1965). The Future of the Philosophy of Mind. Southern Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):38-44.
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  2. Zed Adams (ed.) (forthcoming). Truth & Understanding: Essays in Honor of John Haugeland.
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  3. Nir Aides, Yet Another Objection to Fading and Dancing Qualia.
    In this paper I present objections to the Fading Qualia and Dancing Qualia thought experiments, which David Chalmers uses to argue that functional organization fully determines conscious experience.
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  4. Jonas Åkerman (2009). Perspectival Thought: A Plea for Moderate Relativism. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 62 (4).
  5. Lilli Alanen (1982). Studies in Cartesian Epistemology and Philosophy of Mind. Distributed by Akateeminen Kirjakauppa.
  6. Victoria N. Alexander (2013). Creativity: Self-Referential Mistaking, Not Negating. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 6 (2):253-272.
    In C. S. Peirce, as well as in the work of many biosemioticians, the semiotic object is sometimes described as a physical “object” with material properties and sometimes described as an “ideal object” or mental representation. I argue that to the extent that we can avoid these types of characterizations we will have a more scientific definition of sign use and will be able to better integrate the various fields that interact with biosemiotics. In an effort to end Cartesian dualism (...)
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  7. A. H. Almaas (1986/2000). The Void: Inner Spaciousness and Ego Structure. Shambhala.
    In this book Almaas brings together concepts and experiences drawn from contemporary object relations theory, Freudian-based ego psychology, case studies from his own spiritual practice, and teaching from the highest levels of Buddhist and other Eastern practices. He challenges us to look not only at the personality and the content of the mind, but also at the underlying nature of the mind itself.
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  8. Jami L. Anderson & Simon Cushing (eds.) (2013). The Philosophy of Autism. Rowman & Littlefield.
    The Philosophy of Autism examines autism from the tradition of analytic philosophy, working from the premise that so-called autism spectrum disorders raise interesting philosophical questions that need to be and can be addressed in a manner that is clear, jargon-free, and accessible. The goal of the original essays in this book is to provide a philosophically rich analysis of issues raised by autism and to afford dignity and respect to those living with autism by placing it at the center of (...)
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  9. Massimiliano Aragona (2014). Epistemological Reflections About the Crisis of the DSM-5 and the Revolutionary Potential of the RDoC Project. Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 7 (1):11-20.
    This paper tests the predictions of an epistemological model that considered the DSM psychiatric classification (in the neopositivist and neo-Kraepelinian shape introduced by the DSM-III) as a scientific paradigm in crisis. As predicted, the DSM-5 did not include revolutionary proposals in its basic structure. In particular, the possibility of a dimensional revolution has not occurred and early proposals of etiopathogenic diagnoses were not implemented due to lack of specific knowledge in that field. However, conceiving the DSM-5 as a bridge between (...)
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  10. Caroline T. Arruda & Daniel J. Povinelli (forthcoming). Chimps as Secret Agents. Synthese:1-30.
    We provide an account of chimpanzee-specific agency within the context of philosophy of action. We do so by showing that chimpanzees are capable of what we call reason-directed action, even though they may be incapable of more full-blown action, which we call reason-considered action. Although chimpanzee agency does not possess all the features of typical adult human agency, chimpanzee agency is evolutionarily responsive to their environment and overlaps considerably with our own. As such, it is an evolved set of capacities (...)
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  11. Luis M. Augusto (2012). Teodorico de Freiberg. Tratado sobre a origem das coisas categoriais. 3. Revista Filosófica de Coimbra 21 (42):607-648.
    Translation from the Latin into Portuguese, with extensive introduction and notes, of Dietrich of Freiberg's De origine rerum praedicamentalium, Chapter 5. This text, a late medieval treatise on reality and human cognition (or human cognition and reality), is a particularly hard nut to crack; hence my having translated it (O.K., I also enjoyed the Latin part).
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  12. Luis M. Augusto (2012). Teodorico de Freiberg. Tratado sobre a origem das coisas categoriais. 2. Revista Filosófica de Coimbra 21 (41):297-330.
    Translation from the Latin into Portuguese, with extensive introduction and notes, of Dietrich of Freiberg's De origine rerum praedicamentalium, Chapters 3 and 4. This text, a late medieval treatise on reality and human cognition (or human cognition and reality), is a particularly hard nut to crack; hence my having translated it (O.K., I also enjoyed the Latin part).
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  13. Luis M. Augusto (2011). Teodorico de Freiberg. Tratado sobre a origem das coisas categoriais. 1. Revista Filosófica de Coimbra 20 (40):507-552.
    Translation from the Latin into Portuguese, with extensive introduction and notes, of Dietrich of Freiberg's De origine rerum praedicamentalium, Chapters 1 and 2. This text, a late medieval treatise on reality and human cognition (or human cognition and reality), is a particularly hard nut to crack; hence my having translated it (O.K., I also enjoyed the Latin part).
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  14. Ignacio Avila (2000). La modularidad de la mente y el relativismo epistemológico. Ideas Y Valores 112:37-65.
    El objetivo de este ensayo es examinar la relevancia epistemológica de la tesis de la modularidad de la mente de Jerry Fodor. Trataré de mostrar que esta tesis, por sí misma, no logra refutar al relativista epistemológico puesto que, de un lado, la existencia de un terreno neutral común no excluye la inconmensurabilidad, a menos que se garantice además que en dicho terreno se resuelven los desacuerdos científicos. De otro lado, la teoría de la modularidad de la mente resulta insuficiente (...)
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  15. Saray Ayala (2010). Superfunctionalizing the Mind. [REVIEW] Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy (1).
  16. David Bain (2010). Pain: New Essays on Its Nature and the Methodology of Its Study, Edited by Murat Aydede. [REVIEW] Mind 119 (474):451-456.
    Review of Murat Aydede's edited collection, *Pain: New Essays on Its Nature and the Methodology of Its Study".
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  17. Lynne Rudder Baker, Our Place in Nature: Material Persons and Theism.
    One of the deepest assumptions of Judaism and its offspring, Christianity, is that there is an important difference between human persons and everything else that exists in Creation. We alone are made in God’s image. We alone are the stewards of the earth. It is said in Genesis that we have “dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps (...)
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  18. Rudolph Bauer (2012). Undying and Unborn and Unbound Base of Space and Light. Transmission 1 (Awareness).
    This paper focuses on the base of awareness as space and light.
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  19. PhD Bauer, Rudolph Bauer (2012). The Luminousity of Language and Symbol. Transmission 1 (Awareness).
    This paper focuses on the relationship of language within the awareness field.
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  20. Joe Becker (2008). Conceptualizing Mind and Consciousness: Using Constructivist Ideas to Transcend the Physical Bind. Human Development 51 (3):165-189.
    Philosophers and scientists seeking to conceptualize consciousness, and subjective experience in particular, have focused on sensation and perception, and have emphasized binding – how a percept holds together. Building on a constructivist approach to conception centered on separistic-holistic complexes incorporating multiple levels of abstraction, the present approach reconceptualizes binding and opens a new path to theorizing the emergence of consciousness. It is proposed that all subjective experience involves multiple levels of abstraction, a central feature of conception. This modifies the prevalent (...)
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  21. Joe Becker (2004). Reconsidering the Role of Overcoming Perturbations in Cognitive Development: Constructivism and Consicousness. Human Development 47 (2):77-93.
    Constructivist theory must choose between the hypothesis that felt perturbation drives cognitive development (the priority of felt perturbation) and the hypothesis that the particular process that eventually produces new cognitive structures first produces felt perturbation (the continuity of process). There is ambivalence in Piagetian theory regarding this choice. The prevalent account of constructivist theory adopts the priority of felt perturbation. However, on occasion Piaget has explicitly rejected it, simultaneously endorsing the continuity of process. First, I explicate and support this latter (...)
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  22. Endre Begby (2011). Concepts and Abilities in Anti-Individualism. Journal of Philosophy 108 (10):555-575.
  23. Luke Benton, On the Nature of a Healthy Mind.
  24. Krystyna Bielecka (2014). Spread Mind and Causal Theories of Content. Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies (2):87-97.
    In this paper, I analyze a type of externalist enactivism defended by Riccardo Manzotti. Such radical versions of enactivism are gaining more attention, especially in cognitive science and cognitive robotics. They are radical in that their notion of representation is purely referential, and content is conflated with reference. Manzotti follows in the footsteps of early causal theories of reference that had long been shown to be inadequate. It is commonly known that radical versions of externalism may lead to difficulties with (...)
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  25. Sandra Blakeslee (2007/2008). The Body has a Mind of its Own: New Discoveries About How the Mind-Body Connection Helps Us Master the World. Random House.
    The body mandala, or, How your brain maps the world -- The little man in the brain, or, Why your genitals are even smaller than you think -- Dueling body maps, or, Why you still feel fat after losing weight -- The homunculus in the game, or, When thinking is as good as doing -- Plasticity gone awry, or, When body maps go blurry -- Broken body maps, or, Why Dr. Strangelove couldn't keep his hand down -- The bubble around (...)
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  26. Brand Blanshard (1941). The Nature of Mind. Journal of Philosophy 38 (April):207-215.
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  27. Paul Richard Blum (2012). The Epistemology of Immortality: Searle, Pomponazzi, and Ficino. Studia Neoaristotelica 9 (1):85-102.
    The relationship between body and mind was traditionally discussed in terms of immortality of the intellect, because immateriality was one necessary condition for the mind to be immortal. This appeared to be an issue of metaphysics and religion. But to the medieval and Renaissance thinkers, the essence of mind is thinking activity and hence an epistemological feature. Starting with John Searle’s worries about the existence of consciousness, I try to show some parallels with the Aristotelian Pietro Pomponazzi (1462–1525), and eventually (...)
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  28. David Bohm (ed.) (1992/1994). Thought as a System. Routledge.
    In Thought as a System , best-selling author David Bohm takes as his subject the role of thought and knowledge at every level of human affairs, from our private reflections on personal identity to our collective efforts to fashion a tolerable civilization. Elaborating upon principles of the relationship between mind and matter first put forward in Wholeness and the Implicate Order , Professor Bohm rejects the notion that our thinking processes neutrally report on what is `out there' in an objective (...)
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  29. Francesca Bordogna (2008). William James at the Boundaries: Philosophy, Science, and the Geography of Knowledge. University of Chicago Press.
    At Columbia University in 1906, William James gave a highly confrontational speech to the American Philosophical Association (APA). He ignored the technical philosophical questions the audience had gathered to discuss and instead addressed the topic of human energy. Tramping on the rules of academic decorum, James invoked the work of amateurs, read testimonials on the benefits of yoga and alcohol, and concluded by urging his listeners to take up this psychological and physiological problem. What was the goal of this unusual (...)
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  30. Francesca Bordogna (2001). The Physiology and Psychology of Temperament: Pragmatism in Context. Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 37:3-25.
    This paper traces William James's famous “temperament thesis” according to which the philosophical stance that individuals take depends on their “temperaments.” It seeks to understand James's conception of temperament by locating James within a set of contemporary investigations that linked the sources of mental, and even higher, intellectual processes to the physiological and organic constitution of the individual. The paper argues that James understood temperament along the reflex-arc model and discusses the implications of that physiological account of temperament for James's (...)
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  31. Fritz Breithaupt (2012). A Three-Person Model of Empathy. Emotion Review 4 (1):84-91.
    This article proposes a three-step model of empathy. It assumes that people have various empathy-related mechanisms available and thus can be described as hyper-empathic (Step 1). Under these conditions, the question of blocking and controlling empathy becomes a central issue to channel empathic attention and to avoid self-loss (Step 2). It is assumed that empathy can be sustained only when these mechanisms of controlling empathy are bypassed (Step 3). In particular, the article proposes a three-person scenario with one observing a (...)
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  32. Robert Briscoe & John Schwenkler (2015). Conscious Vision in Action. Cognitive Science 39 (2).
    It is natural to assume that the fine-grained and highly accurate spatial information present in visual experience is often used to guide our bodily actions. Yet this assumption has been challenged by proponents of the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis , according to which visuomotor programming is the responsibility of a “zombie” processing stream whose sources of bottom-up spatial information are entirely non-conscious . In many formulations of TVSH, the role of conscious vision in action is limited to “recognizing objects, selecting (...)
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  33. Brian Bruya (ed.) (2010). Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action. MIT Press.
    This is the first book to explore the cognitive science of effortless attention and action. Attention and action are generally understood to require effort, and the expectation is that under normal circumstances effort increases to meet rising demand. Sometimes, however, attention and action seem to flow effortlessly despite high demand. Effortless attention and action have been documented across a range of normal activities--from rock climbing to chess playing--and yet fundamental questions about the cognitive science of effortlessness have gone largely unasked. (...)
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  34. Brian Bruya (2010). Apertures, Draw, and Syntax: Remodeling Attention. In Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action. MIT Press 219.
    Because psychological studies of attention and cognition are most commonly performed within the strict confines of the laboratory or take cognitively impaired patients as subjects, it is difficult to be sure that resultant models of attention adequately account for the phenomenon of effortless attention. The problem is not only that effortless attention is resistant to laboratory study. A further issue is that because the laboratory is the most common way to approach attention, models resulting from such studies are naturally the (...)
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  35. Ian Burkitt (1999). Bodies of Thought: Embodiment, Identity, and Modernity. Sage Publications.
    `The work develops and articulates a brilliant and original central thesis; namely that modern individuals are best understood as complex bodies of thought, as embodied symbolic and material beings. Future work on mind, self, body, society and culture will have to begin with Burkitt's text' - Norman K. Denzin, University of Illinois `After his excellent Social Selves, Ian Burkitt has produced a new theory of embodiment which will become required reading for those working in the areas of social theory, sociology, (...)
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  36. Claudio Calosi & Vincenzo Fano (2012). Coscienza e fisicalismo minimale. In Vincenzo Fano, Enrico Giannetto, Giulia Giannini & Pierluigi Graziani (eds.), Complessità e Riduzionismo. © ISONOMIA – Epistemologica, University of Urbino 44-53.
    In questo lavoro si presenta un nuovo esperimento mentale che solleva un particolare problema per quello che possiamo chiamare “fisicalismo minimale” in filosofia della mente. In particolare si argomenta che il fisicalismo minimale o i) non è in grado di fornirne un resoconto adeguato dell’esperimento mentale presentato, o ii) viene costretto a fornire un resoconto che è fortemente in contrasto con la nostra immagine scientifica del mondo. Il problema sollevato è un particolare esempio di quelli che Chalmers (1996) definisce hard (...)
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  37. Muñoz-Suárez Carlos, CONCRETE ENTITIES AND NON-CONCRETE ENTITIES IN COGNITION.
    Seems plausible to accept the thesis that “it is not objects per se that have a special status in the mind of the child”. I grasp this thesis in the sense that the only stuff that infants can individuate are not objects, but this not implies that objects do not make the core contribution to our (adult) metaphysical conceptual scheme, i.e. to constitute a platform for basic adaptive environmental performances in adult life. Plausibly, any young human cognitive system needs to (...)
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  38. Peter Carruthers (ed.) (2007). The Innate Mind: Foundations and the Future. Oxford University Press, USA.
    Concerned with the fundamental architecture of the mind, this text addresses questions about the existence & extent of human innate abilities, how these inate ...
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  39. Edward S. Casey (2004). Spirit and Soul: Essays in Philosophical Psychology. Spring Publications.
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  40. Kisor K. Chakrabarti (2003). Response to Roy W. Perrett's Review of "Classical Indian Philosophy of Mind: The Nyāya Dualist Tradition". Philosophy East and West 53 (4):593-598.
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  41. David J. Chalmers (2008). Mind and Consciousness: Five Questions. In Patrick Grim (ed.), Mind and Consciousness: Five Questions. Automatic Press
    Growing up, I was a mathematics and science geek. I read everything I could in these areas. Every now and then, something would point in a philosophical direction. Perhaps my most important influence was reading Hofstadter’s Gödel, Escher, Bach as a teenager. I read it initially for the mathematical parts, but it planted a seed for thinking about the mind. Later, Hofstadter and Dennett’s The Mind’s I got me thinking more about the mind–body problem in particular.
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  42. Hugh Chandler (1985). Indeterminate People. Analysis 45 (3):141-145.
    Here is the paper that was attacked by George Rea in his “How many minds…?” paper. Has this issue been resolved? Can there be entities such that there is no definite answer to the question “Are there 13 minds at work here, or 14?” -/- .
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  43. Hugh S. Chandler, -≫Tredecims.
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  44. Hugh S. Chandler, -≫13 'Minds'.
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  45. Stéphane Chauvier (2007). Wittgensteinian Grammar and Philosophy of Mind. In Danièle Moyal-Sharrock (ed.), Perspicuous Presentations: Essays on Wittgenstein's Philosophy of Psychology. Palgrave Macmillan
  46. Chung-ying Cheng (1973). Unity and Creativity in Wang Yang-Ming's Philosophy of Mind. Philosophy East and West 23 (1/2):49-72.
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  47. Stephen R. L. Clark (2003). Minds and Persons: Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement: 53. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
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  48. Stephen R. L. Clark (2003). Non-Personal Minds. In Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 185-209.
    Persons are creatures with a range of personal capacities. Most known to us are also people, though nothing in observation or biological theory demands that all and only people are persons, nor even that persons, any more than people, constitute a natural kind. My aim is to consider what non-personal minds are like. Darwin's Earthworms are sensitive, passionate and, in their degree, intelligent. They may even construct maps, embedded in the world they perceive around them, so as to be able (...)
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  49. Caleb Cohoe (2013). Why the Intellect Cannot Have a Bodily Organ: De Anima 3.4. Phronesis 58 (4):347-377.
    I reconstruct Aristotle’s reasons for thinking that the intellect cannot have a bodily organ. I present Aristotle’s account of the aboutness or intentionality of cognitive states, both perceptual and intellectual. On my interpretation, Aristotle’s account is based around the notion of cognitive powers taking on forms in a special preservative way. Based on this account, Aristotle argues that no physical structure could enable a bodily part or combination of bodily parts to produce or determine the full range of forms that (...)
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  50. Giovanna Colombetti & Tom Roberts (2015). Extending the Extended Mind: The Case for Extended Affectivity. Philosophical Studies 172 (5):1243-1263.
    The thesis of the extended mind (ExM) holds that the material underpinnings of an individual’s mental states and processes need not be restricted to those contained within biological boundaries: when conditions are right, material artefacts can be incorporated by the thinking subject in such a way as to become a component of her extended mind. Up to this point, the focus of this approach has been on phenomena of a distinctively cognitive nature, such as states of dispositional belief, and processes (...)
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