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  1. George Ainslie (1993). A Picoeconomic Rationale for Social Constructionism. Behavior and Philosophy 21 (2):63 - 75.
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  2. R. T. Allen (1991). Passivity and the Rationality of Emotion. Modern Schoolman 68 (4):321-330.
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  3. Ira Altman (1997). The Concept of Intelligence: A Philosophical Analysis. University Press of America.
  4. Michael Apter (2008). Reversal Theory, Victor Turner and the Experience of Ritual. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (s 10-11):184-203.
    The extraordinary parallel between the psychological theory of reversals (Apter, 1982) and the anthropological theory of anti-structure (Turner, 1982)-- both derived independently and almost simultaneously from entirely different kinds of evidence and research-- would seem to point to something profound and universal in human experience which has been curiously neglected in the behavioural sciences and entirely ignored in consciousness studies. What I will do here is to introduce reversal theory, show how it applies to ritual, and then compare it with (...)
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  5. J. L. Austin (1964). A Plea for Excuses. In V. C. Chappell (ed.), Ordinary Language: Essays in Philosophical Method. Dover Publications. 1--30.
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  6. J. M. B. (1972). Mind and Brain. Review of Metaphysics 25 (4):766-767.
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  7. R. J. B. (1963). The Philosophy of Mind. Review of Metaphysics 17 (1):154-154.
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  8. David Bain (2005). Daniel Dennett. Reconciling Science and Our Self-Conception. By Matthew. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):369-371.
    Review of Matthew's Elton's book, *Daniel Dennett: Reconciling Science and Our Self-Conception*.
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  9. Francesco Belfiore (2008). Mind as an Evolving Triadic Entity. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 42:5-12.
    In this paper, through external and internal observation (introspection), it is shown that the human mind (or spirit) can be defined as an evolving, conscious, triadic entity consisting of unitary-multiple components - intellect, sensitiveness, and power - which in turn are made of multiple ideas, sentiments, and actions, respectively. The three mind components are interdependent, each needing the support of the other two for its activity. This interdependence, which is linked to the problem of mind-body relationship, is explained by the (...)
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  10. Anne Bezuidenhout (1996). Modern Philosophy of Mind. Teaching Philosophy 19 (2):209-212.
  11. Paul Richard Blum, Epistemology and Cosmology in Neoplatonism: Is Cognition a Mind-Body-Problem? Paper at Cosmos, Nature, Culture - A Transdisciplinary Conference Metanexus Conference July 18-21, 2009, Phoenix, Arizona. [REVIEW] http://www.metanexus.net/conference2009/articles/Default.aspx?id=10790.
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  12. Janine Chasseguet-Smirgel (2005). The Body as Mirror of the World. Free Association.
  13. Michael Clark (1991). Review of Julius Moravcsik, Thought and Language. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 32.
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  14. Daniel C. Dennett (1977). The Philosophy of Mind. Teaching Philosophy 2 (2):196-197.
  15. Daniel C. Dennett (1977). The Philosophy of Mind. Teaching Philosophy 2 (2):196-197.
  16. Charles Echelbarger (1989). Wittgenstein's Philosophy of Mind. Idealistic Studies 19 (2):182-182.
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  17. Michael Esfeld, Recent German Books in the Philosophy of Mind.
    Gottschling, Verena (2003): Bilder im Geiste. Die Imagery-Debatte. Paderborn: Mentis. Nida-Rümelin, Martine (2006): Der Blick von Innen. Zur transtemporalen Identität bewusstseinsfähiger Wesen. Frankfurt (Main): Suhrkamp.
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  18. Bill Faw (2007). 'And the Danube Runs Through It …' Review of TSC 2007, Budapest, July 23-27. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (11):83-95.
    This was my first 'Tucson-overseas' conference, and I will begin by briefly comparing this series with the (to me) more familiar ASSC and Tucson conferences -- several of which I have reviewed for JCS.
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  19. Bill Faw (2001). Whither Consciousness Studies? Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (8):70-74.
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  20. Tom Feldges (2013). Neurophenomenology--Current Problems and Historical Baggage A Review of the CEP Annual Conference on Neurophenomenology Bristol, Wills Hall, September 2012. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (3-4):3-4.
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  21. R. W. Fischer (2011). Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Mind (Contemporary Debates in Philosophy). Edited by Brian P. McLaughlin and Jonathan Cohen. Heythrop Journal 52 (2):338-338.
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  22. Shaun Gallagher (2005). How the Body Shapes the Mind. Oxford University Press.
    How the Body Shapes the Mind is an interdisciplinary work that addresses philosophical questions by appealing to evidence found in experimental psychology, neuroscience, studies of pathologies, and developmental psychology. There is a growing consensus across these disciplines that the contribution of embodiment to cognition is inescapable. Because this insight has been developed across a variety of disciplines, however, there is still a need to develop a common vocabulary that is capable of integrating discussions of brain mechanisms in neuroscience, behavioral expressions (...)
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  23. Raymond W. Gibbs (2006). Embodiment and Cognitive Science. New York ;Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores how people's subjective, felt experiences of their bodies in action provide part of the fundamental grounding for human cognition and language. Cognition is what occurs when the body engages the physical and cultural world and must be studied in terms of the dynamical interactions between people and the environment. Human language and thought emerge from recurring patterns of embodied activity that constrain ongoing intelligent behavior. We must not assume cognition to be purely internal, symbolic, computational, and disembodied, (...)
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  24. Peter Goldie (2012). Comment on Breithaupt's "A Three-Person Model of Empathy&Quot;. Emotion Review 4 (1):92-93.
    Breithaupt’s central claim is that “empathy can be regarded as a mechanism for strengthening a decision” (2012, p. 87). My concern is that it is not clear what is meant by “strengthen.” Does empathy merely give more motivational “oomph” to a decision already made, or does it strengthen a decision in the normative sense—does it give more reason for the decision?
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  25. Justin Gosling (2001). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind. International Philosophical Quarterly 41 (2):253-255.
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  26. Richard Gray (2001). Synaesthesia: An Essay in Philosophical Psychology. Dissertation, University of Edinburgh
  27. Edwin Hutchins (2010). Cognitive Ecology. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):705-715.
    Cognitive ecology is the study of cognitive phenomena in context. In particular, it points to the web of mutual dependence among the elements of a cognitive ecosystem. At least three fields were taking a deeply ecological approach to cognition 30 years ago: Gibson’s ecological psychology, Bateson’s ecology of mind, and Soviet cultural-historical activity theory. The ideas developed in those projects have now found a place in modern views of embodied, situated, distributed cognition. As cognitive theory continues to shift from units (...)
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  28. D. D. Hutto (2007). Review: Mind and Supermind. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (461):170-173.
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  29. Daniel D. Hutto (2007). Narrative and Understanding Persons. In Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplements. 1-.
    The human world is replete with narratives – narratives of our making that are uniquely appreciated by us. Some thinkers have afforded special importance to our capacity to generate such narratives, seeing it as variously enabling us to: exercise our imaginations in unique ways; engender an understanding of actions performed for reasons; and provide a basis for the kind of reflection and evaluation that matters vitally to moral and self development. Perhaps most radically, some hold that narratives are essential for (...)
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  30. David Kaplan (2011). An Idea of Donnellan. In Joseph Almog & Paolo Leonardi (eds.), Having In Mind: The Philosophy of Keith Donnellan. Oxford, but (c) David Kaplan. 122-175.
    This is a story about three of my favorite philosophers—Donnellan, Russell, and Frege—about how Donnellan’s concept of having in mind relates to ideas of the others, and especially about an aspect of Donnellan’s concept that has been insufficiently discussed: how this epistemic state can be transmitted from one person to another.
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  31. Chris A. Kramer (2012). As If: Connecting Phenomenology, Mirror Neurons, Empathy, and Laughter. Phaenex 7 (1):275-308.
    The discovery of mirror neurons in both primates and humans has led to an enormous amount of research and speculation as to how conscious beings are able to interact so effortlessly among one another. Mirror neurons might provide an embodied basis for passive synthesis and the eventual process of further communalization through empathy, as envisioned by Edmund Husserl. I consider the possibility of a phenomenological and scientific investigation of laughter as a point of connection that might in the future bridge (...)
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  32. Joel Krueger (forthcoming). Empathy, Enaction, and Shared Musical Experience. In Tom Cochrane, Bernardino Fantini & Klaus Scherer (eds.), The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Expression, Arousal and Social Control. Oxford University Press.
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  33. Béatrice Longuenesse (2010). Of Different Ways to Relate to Oneself. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 2010 (4):19-31.
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  34. Ulric Neisser (2001). The Dorsal System and the Ecological Self. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):114-114.
    Perception, as Gibson described it – picking up information that specifies the real local situation – includes not only perceiving affordances and controlling small movements, but also seeing the large-scale environmental layout and the position/movement of the “ecological self.” If the dorsal cortical system is also responsible for that very significant achievement, its activity must be at least partly conscious.
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  35. Dimitris Platchias (2006). Review of David Woodruff Smith & Amie L. Thomasson. Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind (Oxford University Press, 2005). [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (3):113-117.
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  36. Mark Rowlands (2012). Representing Without Representations. Avant 3 (1):133-144.
    There is a problem of representation and an apparatus of representations that was devised to solve this problem. This paper has two purposes. First, it will show why the problem of representation outstrips the apparatus of representations in the sense that the problem survives the demise of the apparatus. Secondly, it will argue that the question of whether cognition does or not involve representations is a poorly defined question, and far too crude to be helpful in understanding the nature of (...)
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  37. Robert D. Rupert, Keeping HEC in CHEC.
    According to the hypothesis of extended cognition (HEC, hereafter), human cognitive processing extends beyond the boundary of the human organism.1 As I understand HEC, it is a claim in the..
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  38. Jean-Pierre Schachter (1997). The Angel in the Machine. Journal of Philosophical Research 22:445-460.
    In “The Angel in the Machine” I argue that the substantial concept of mind is heir to a number of consequences not previously appreciated, included among which (but not limited to) are both Solipsism and Atheism. In addition, I suggest that the difficulties I indicate were to some extent already understood by Aristotle who seems to have laid the foundation for two concepts of mind, one associated with human beings, the other with Angels. His distinction is recalled in the Middle (...)
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  39. Thomas Sheehan, Heidegger's Philosophy of Mind.
    The period after World War Two saw the emergence both of the so-called later Heidegger and of the corresponding problem of the unity of his thought. Although his major work, Sein und Zeit, 1927 (=SZ) had announced Heidegger's intention of working out the meaning of being (Sein), his publications up through 1943, with the exception of the brief Vom Wesen der Wahrheit, presented only his preparatory analysis of human openness (Dasein). However, Heidegger's post-war publications seemed to emphasize “being itself” (the (...)
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  40. Daniel Watts (2012). The Exemplification of Rules: An Appraisal of Pettit's Approach to the Problem of Rule-Following. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (1):69-90.
    Abstract This paper offers an appraisal of Phillip Pettit?s approach to the problem how a merely finite set of examples can serve to represent a determinate rule, given that indefinitely many rules can be extrapolated from any such set. I argue that Pettit?s so-called ethocentric theory of rule-following fails to deliver the solution to this problem he sets out to provide. More constructively, I consider what further provisions are needed in order to advance Pettit?s general approach to the problem. I (...)
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  41. Dan Zahavi (2012). Basic Empathy and Complex Empathy. Emotion Review 4 (1):81-82.
    In my short commentary, I dwell on the distinction between basic and complex empathy, and suggest that a basic perception-based form of empathy might point to the existence of a type of social understanding that is more direct and more fundamental than the types of social cognition normally addressed by simulation theory and theory theory.
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  42. Edoardo Zamuner (2011). A Theory of Affect Perception. Mind and Language 26 (4):436-451.
    What do we see when we look at someone's expression of fear? I argue that one of the things that we see is fear itself. I support this view by developing a theory of affect perception. The theory involves two claims. One is that expressions are patterns of facial changes that carry information about affects. The other is that the visual system extracts and processes such information. In particular, I argue that the visual system functions to detect the affects of (...)
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Philosophy of Mind, General Works
  1. Mitchell Aboulafia (2011). Through the Eyes of Mad Men: Simulation, Interaction, and Ethics. European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy (2):133-147.
    Traditionally pragmatists have been favorably disposed to improving our understanding of agency and ethics through the use of empirical research. In the last two decades simulation theory has been championed in certain cognitive science circles as a way of explaining how we attribute mental states and predict human behavior. Drawing on research in psychology and neuroscience, Alvin I. Goldman and Robert M. Gordon have not only used simulation theory to discuss how we “mindread”, but have suggested that the theory has (...)
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  2. Kenneth Aizawa (2014). The Enactivist Revolution. Avant (2):19-42.
    Among the many ideas that go by the name of “enactivism” there is the idea that by “cognition” we should understand what is more commonly taken to be behavior. For clarity, label such forms of enactivism “enactivismb.” This terminology requires some care in evaluating enactivistb claims. There is a genuine risk of enactivist and non-enactivist cognitive scientists talking past one another. So, for example, when enactivistsb write that “cognition does not require representations” they are not necessarily denying what cognitivists claim (...)
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  3. Joshua Alexander, Ronald Mallon & Jonathan Weinberg (2010). Competence: What's In? What's Out? Who Knows? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):329-330.
    Knobe's argument rests on a way of distinguishing performance errors from the competencies that delimit our cognitive architecture. We argue that other sorts of evidence than those that he appeals to are needed to illuminate the boundaries of our folk capacities in ways that would support his conclusions.
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  4. Jan Almäng (2007). Intentionality and Intersubjectivity. Göteborgs Universitet.
    1. Introduction. The problems of other minds ; Body, mind and other minds ; The analogical theory ; The critical theory ; Functionalism and mental states as theoretical entities ; A brief outline of things to come -- 2. Functionalism and the nature of mental representations. Functionalism and cognitive psychology ; Folk psychology and the representational theory of mind -- 3. Theory theory and simulation theory. A very short introduction to the world of theory theory and simulation theory ; A (...)
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  5. Torin Alter & Robert J. Howell (2011). Consciousness and The Mind-Body Problem: A Reader. OUP USA.
    Over the past three decades, the challenge that conscious experience poses to physicalism--the widely held view that the universe is a completely physical system--has provoked a growing debate in philosophy of mind studies and given rise to a great deal of literature on the subject. Ideal for courses in consciousness and the philosophy of mind, Consciousness and The Mind-Body Problem: A Reader presents thirty-three classic and contemporary readings, organized into five sections that cover the major issues in this debate: the (...)
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  6. Jami L. Anderson & Simon Cushing (eds.) (2013). The Philosophy of Autism. Rowman & Littlefield.
    The Philosophy of Autism examines autism from the tradition of analytic philosophy, working from the premise that so-called autism spectrum disorders raise interesting philosophical questions that need to be and can be addressed in a manner that is clear, jargon-free, and accessible. The goal of the original essays in this book is to provide a philosophically rich analysis of issues raised by autism and to afford dignity and respect to those living with autism by placing it at the center of (...)
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  7. David M. Armstrong (1999). The Mind-Body Problem: An Opinionated Introduction. Westview Press.
    The emphasis is always on the arguments used, and the way one position develops from another. By the end of the book the reader is afforded both a grasp of the state of the controversy, and how we got there.
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  8. Yehuda Atai (2011). Torat Ha-Meḥolelim: Torat Ha-Meḥolelim Ha-Generit le-Maʻarakhot Ḥayot: Merkevet Ḥayim - Masekhet Filosofit.
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