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  1. Rita Aiello & John A. Sloboda (eds.) (1994). Musical Perceptions. Oxford University Press.
    Musical Perceptions is a much-needed text that introduces students of both music and psychology to the study of music perception and cognition. Because the book aims to foster a closer interaction between research in the science and the art of music, both psychologists and musicians contribute chapters on a wide range of topics, including the philosophy of music; research in musical performance; perception of melody, tonality, and rhythm; pedagogical issues; language and music; and neural networks. With their unique ability to (...)
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  2. Gerhard Albersheim (1964). Mind and Matter in Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 22 (3):289-294.
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  3. Warren Dwight Allen (1946). Music and the Idea of Progress. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 4 (3):166-180.
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  4. Randall Everett Allsup (2007). Extraordinary Rendition: On Politics, Music, and Circular Meanings. Philosophy of Music Education Review 15 (2):144-149.
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  5. Philip Alperson (ed.) (1987/1994). What is Music?: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Music. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Contributors to this volume are Philip Alperson, Francis Sparshott, Nicholas Wolterstorff, Edward T. Cone, Peter Kivy, Jenefer Robinson, Joseph Margolis, Arnold ...
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  6. Philip Alperson (1984). On Musical Improvisation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (1):17-29.
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  7. Hanne Appelqvist (2012). Music in German Philosophy: An Introduction Edited by Sorgner, Stefan Lorenz and Oliver Fürbeth. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):245-247.
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  8. Hanne Appelqvist (2011). On Music, Wine, and the Criteria of Understanding. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):18-35.
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  9. Christopher Bartel (2008). Listening to Popular Music. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):357-359.
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  10. Arnold Cusmariu (2009). The Structure of an Aesthetic Revolution. Journal of Visual Arts Practice 8 (3):163-179.
    Brought about through philosophical analysis – a first in the history of art – paradigm shifts in the ontology and epistemology of sculpture are described, motivated, and exemplified with pieces they inspired. Navigating the new aesthetic environment requires an ‘escape from Plato's Cave’ by means of a kind of phenomenological reduction. The new conceptual foundation allows artists unprecedented levels of freedom to explore and innovate, connects sculpture to music, and has the potential to enhance significantly the appreciation of art and (...)
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  11. Rafael De Clercq (2007). Melody and Metaphorical Movement. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):156-168.
    In recent issues of this journal, Roger Scruton and Malcolm Budd have debated the question whether hearing a melody in a sequence of sounds necessarily involves an ‘unasserted thought’ about spatial movement. According to Scruton, the answer is ‘yes’; according to Budd, the answer is ‘no’. The conclusion of this paper is that, while Budd may have underestimated the viability of Scruton's thesis in one of its possible interpretations, there is no good reason to assume that the thesis is true. (...)
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  12. A. E. Denham (1999). The Moving Mirrors of Music. Music and Letters 80:411-432.
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  13. Theodore Gracyk & Andrew Kania (eds.) (2011). The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Music. Routledge.
    " Guy Dammann, Guildhall School of Music and Drama, UK "This admirable volume will be welcomed by established philosophers of and especially - by those coming ...
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  14. Gordon Graham (2001). Music and Autism. Journal of Aesthetic Education 35.
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  15. Eran Guter (2013). Wittgenstein on Mahler. In Danièle Moyal-Sharrock, Volker A. Munz & Annalisa Coliva (eds.), Mind, Language and Action: Contributions to the 36th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society.
    In this paper I explain Wittgenstein’s ambivalent remarks on the music of Gustav Mahler in their proper musico-philosophical context. I argue that these remarks are connected to Wittgenstein’s hybrid conception of musical decline and to his tripartite scheme of modern music. I also argue that Mahler’s conundrum was indicative of Wittgenstein’s grappling with his own predicament as a philosopher, and that this gives concrete sense to Wittgenstein’s admission that music was so important to him that without it he was sure (...)
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  16. Eran Guter (2011). A Surrogate for the Soul: Wittgenstein and Schoenberg. In Enzo De Pellegrin (ed.), Interactive Wittgenstein. Springer. 109--152.
    This article challenges a widespread assumption, arguing that Wittgenstein and the Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg had little in common beyond their shared cultural heritage, overlapping social circles in fin-de-ciecle Vienna. The article explores Wittgenstein's aesthetic inclinations and the intellectual and philosophical influences that may have reinforced them. The article culminates in an attempt to form a Wittgensteinian response to Schoenberg's dodecaphonic language and to answer the question as to why Wittgenstein and Schoenberg arrived at very different ideas about contemporary music (...)
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  17. Eran Guter (2009). Schoenberg and Wittgenstein: The Odd Couple. In V. A. Munz, K. Puhl & J. Wang (eds.), Language and World, Contributions to the 32nd International Wittgenstein Symposium.
    This paper is an elaborate response to Stanely Cavell's suggestion that Schoenberg's idea of the 12-tone row is a serviceable image of Wittgenstein's idea of grammar. I argue that this suggestion underplays what must be a major premise in any argument for yoking Wittgenstein and Schoenberg: Wittgenstein's philosophically entrenched rejection of modern music. I consider this omission in the context of Wittgenstein's idiosyncratic emulation of Schenker's theory of music in order to facilitate a direct comparison between Wittgenstein's and Schoenberg's sharply (...)
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  18. Eran Guter (2004). Where Languages End: Ludwig Wittgenstein at the Crossroads of Music, Language, and the World. Dissertation, Boston University
    Most commentators have underplayed the philosophical importance of Wittgenstein's multifarious remarks on music, which are scattered throughout his Nachlass. In this dissertation I spell out the extent and depth of Wittgenstein's engagement with certain problems that are regarded today as central to the field of the aesthetics of music, such as musical temporality, expression and understanding. By considering musical expression in its relation to aspect-perception, I argue that Wittgenstein understands music in terms of a highly evolved, vertically complex physiognomic language-game, (...)
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  19. Susanne Herrmann-Sinai (2009). Musik und Zeit bei Kant. Kant-Studien 100 (4):427-453.
    There are two ways of dealing with Kant's derogatory position on music. Either it is claimed that Kant's opinion is a result of biographical factors, or Kant is regarded as a mere predecessor of a more successful music aesthetics. While the first way mistakes Kant's personal preferences for a philosophical argument about the nature of sound, the second approach underestimates the close connection between his music aesthetics and his whole philosophical system. Against these approaches the article defends the proposition that (...)
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  20. Robin James (2014). Neoliberal Noise: Attali, Foucault, & the Biopolitics of Uncool. Culture, Theory, and Critique 52 (2):138-158.
    Is it even possible to resist or oppose neoliberalism? I consider two responses that translate musical practices into counter-hegemonic political strategies: Jacques Attali’s theory of “composition” and the biopolitics of “uncool.” Reading Jacques Attali’s Noise through Foucault’s late work, I argue that Attali’s concept of “repetition” is best understood as a theory of neoliberal biopolitics, and his theory composition is actually a model of deregulated subjectivity. Composition is thus not an alternative to neoliberalism but its quintessence. An aesthetics and ethos (...)
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  21. Robin James (2013). From "No Future" to "Delete Yourself (You Have No Chance To Win)&Quot;. Journal of Popular Music Studies 25 (4).
    Beginning with the role of the Sex Pistols’s (1977) “God Save the Queen” in Lee Edelman (2004) and J. Jack Halberstam’s (2010) debates about queer death and failure, I follow a musical motive (the main guitar riff) from the Pistols track to its reappearance in Atari Teenage Riot’s (ATR’s) 1995 “Delete Yourself (You Have No Chance To Win).” In this song, as in much of ATR’s work from the 1990s, overlapping (and often appropriated) queer and Afro-diasporic aesthetics condense around the (...)
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  22. Robin James (2012). Affective Resonance: On the Uses and Abuses of Music in and for Philosophy. Phaenex 7 (2):59-95.
    Because music communicates extra-propositionally, philosophers often use musical concepts and metaphors to discuss implicit and/or affective knowledges. Music is a productive means to philosophically analyze affect, but only when these analyses are grounded in rigorous studies of actual musical works and practices. When we don’t ground our study of music in musical practices, works, and theories, “music” just becomes a mirror of whatever assumptions and biases we already have. I show how the overly-abstract treatment of music and sound in Jean-Luc (...)
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  23. Robin James (2011). &Quot;these.Are.The Breaks&Quot;: Rethinking "Disagreement" Through Hip Hop. Transformations (19).
    In this paper, I argue that it is productive to read Rancière’s theory of political practice – what he calls “disagreement” – with and against Kodwo Eshun’s theorization of hip hop. Thinking disagreement through hip hop helps flesh out how, exactly, disagreement works, particularly at the level of individual embodiment and consciousness. While Rancière himself gives us many examples of interruptions to the political body (the demos speaking, Jean Derion asserting the non-universality of “universal” man, etc.), I am interested in (...)
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  24. Kareem Khalifa (2009). Music, Philosophy, and Modernity (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 481-482.
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  25. Nicholas Maxwell (2003). Art as Its Own Interpretation. In Andreea Ruvoi (ed.), Interpretation and Its Objects: Studies in the Philosophy of Michael Krausz. Rodopi.
    In this article I argue that a work of art provides the best interpretation of itself - more faithful than any other scholarly interpretative work.
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  26. Jonathan A. Neufeld (2013). Billy Budd's Song: Authority and Music in the Public Sphere. Opera Quarterly 28 (3-4):172-191.
    While Billy Budd's beauty has often been connected to his innocence and his moral goodness, the significance of the musical character of his beauty—what I will argue is the site of a struggle for political expression—has not been remarked upon by commentators of Melville's novella. It has, however, been deeply explored by Britten's opera. Music has often been situated at, or just beyond, the limits of communication; it has served as a medium of the ineffable, of unsaid and unsayable truths (...)
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  27. Jonathan A. Neufeld (2011). Living the Work: Meditations on a Lark. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (1):89-106.
    Imagine that a performer is confronted with the following decision. After working on a piece for several weeks—practicing, analyzing, listening to various recordings, perhaps reading a bit about it—a performer comes to a crossroads. It seems to him that changing a few crucial interrelated passages can generate two very different performative interpretations. One makes the piece sound animated, lively, and interesting; the other makes the piece sound repetitive, flat, and perhaps even boring. While the performer can understand why one would (...)
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  28. Jonathan A. Neufeld (2009). Musical Formalism and Political Performances. Contemporary Aesthetics 7.
    Musical formalism, which strictly limits the type of thing any description of the music can tell us, is ill-equipped to account for contemporary performance practice. If performative interpretations are in a position to tell us something about musical works—that is if performance is a kind of description, as Peter Kivy argues—then we have to loosen the restrictions on notions of musical relevance to make sense of performance. I argue that musical formalism, which strictly limits the type of thing any description (...)
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  29. Cynthia R. Nielsen (2009). “What Has Coltrane to Do With Mozart: The Dynamism and Built-in Flexibility of Music”. Expositions 3:57-71.
    Although contemporary Western culture and criticism has usually valued composition over improvisation and placed the authority of a musical work with the written text rather than the performer, this essay posits these divisions as too facile to articulate the complex dynamics of making music in any genre or form. Rather it insists that music should be understood as pieces that are created with specific intentions by composers but which possess possibilities of interpretation that can only be brought out through performance.
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  30. Tiger C. Roholt (2014). Groove: A Phenomenology of Rhythmic Nuance. Bloomsbury Academic.
    Roholt explains why grooves, which are forged in music’s rhythmic nuances, remain hidden to some listeners. He argues that grooves are not graspable through the intellect nor through mere listening; rather, grooves are disclosed through our bodily engagement with music. We grasp a groove bodily by moving with music’s pulsations. By invoking the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s notion of “motor intentionality,” Roholt shows that the “feel” of a groove, and the understanding of it, are two sides of a coin: to (...)
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  31. Tiger C. Roholt (2011). Continental Philosophy and Music. In Theodore Gracyk & Andrew Kania (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Music. Routledge.
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  32. Tiger C. Roholt (2010). Musical Musical Nuance. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (1):1-10.
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  33. Achille C. Varzi (2013). Cover to Cover. Current Musicology 95:177–191.
    Paul Goguen once said that art is either plagiarism or revolution. That is certainly true of music. From pop to jazz to classical music, there’s a long history of borrowing, lifting, and stealing from other composers, along with other ways of building on their artistic contributions. Here I try to put some order in the complex picture that emerges from such a history, with an eye to the criteria—if any—that underlie the complex ways in which we compare, identify, and categorize (...)
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  34. Nicholas Wilson (2007). Applying Critical Realism : Re-Conceptualising the Emergent Early Music Performer Labour Market. In Clive Lawson, John Latsis & Nuno Martins (eds.), Contributions to Social Ontology. Routledge. 15--304.
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  35. James O. Young (2014). The Poverty of Musical Ontology. Journal of Music and Meaning 13:1-19.
    Aaron Ridley posed the question of whether results in the ontology of musical works would have implications for judgements about the interpretation, meaning or aesthetic value of musical works and performances. His arguments for the conclusion that the ontology of musical works have no aesthetic consequences are unsuccessful, but he is right in thinking (in opposition to Andrew Kania and others) that ontological judgements have no aesthetic consequences. The key to demonstrating this conclusion is the recognition that ontological judgments are (...)
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  36. James O. Young (2005). The ‘Great Divide’ in Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):175-184.
    Several prominent philosophers of music, including Lydia Goehr and Peter Kivy, maintain that the experience of music changed drastically in about 1800. According to the great divide hypothesis, prior to 1800 audiences often scarcely attended to music. At other times, music was appreciated as part of social, civic, or religious ceremonies. After the great divide, audiences began to appreciate music as an exclusive object of aesthetic experience. The great divide hypothesis is false. The musicological record reveals that prior to the (...)
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